Easy Peasy All-in-One Homeschool

A complete, free online Christian homeschool for your family and mine

History — Modern

Modern American History

History — Year 4

Levels:

L — 1st through 4th

M — 5th through 8th

Course Description: Students will study American history from post Civil War to the current day. Students will engage with readings, videos, political cartoons and photographs as they learn about the events and leaders of the past 150 years. Students will create a variety of projects to demonstrate their knowledge as well as write a number of newspaper articles based on events in history.

Reading List:

There are many choices for optional reading.

L  Helen Keller’s The Story of My Life, Keller; A Lifetime of Memories, Giles

M  The Boy’s Life of Edison, Meadowcroft; Facing Death, Henty; The Little Book of the War, Tappan; Animal Farm, Orwell; A Lifetime of Memories, Giles

PLEASE leave a comment to let me know of any problems with links.

Materials:

George Washington Carver, The Transcontinental Railroad

Day 1

L

  1. Read biography of George Washington Carver
  2. Tell a parent or older sibling about George Washington Carver’s life. How many things can you remember?

M

  1. Watch animation about the Growth of the Nation for review and preview (click on play)
  2. *Color a map of the USA to show what states belonged the united States at the end of the Civil War. (Click on USA with Alaska and Hawaii and 1 page and then print.)

Day 2

L**

  1. Watch George Washington Carver video.
  2. *Print out these Timeline Decade Pages. You can put them in a notebook or on the wall. They are for your timeline pieces.
  3. *Print out the modern history timeline packet.
  4. Cut out Carver timeline piece and draw or write about Carver inside. Attach it to your timeline.

M**

  1. Read short biography of George Washington Carver
  2. *Print out these Timeline Decade Pages. You can put them in a notebook or on the wall. They are for your timeline pieces. (L is using this too.)
  3. *Print out modern history timeline packet (L is using this too). Cut out timeline piece and write about Carver. Attach it to your timeline.
  4.  If you are an advanced reader and want to learn more, there is a biographical book on Carver you can read for fun.

Day 3

L*

  1. Watch the video on the transcontinental railroad.
  2. Write: The Transcontinental Railroad means a railroad that travels across a continent. (*You could use your timeline piece or create a *handwriting page.)
  3. continental means something related to a continent, a continent is one of the seven large land areas on earth, trans means across.

M

  1. Play Railroad Race  – On one page it tells you to read a paragraph, but when you click the link, it’s not there. Here are pictures of the three places listed. Which has what the railroad needs?
  2. In the middle you’ll have to choose which company you will work for, click on one. Don’t worry when it tells you to research the Indians or make a project. Just keep clicking. You should try to answer the questions though.

Day 4

L*

  1. Find Sacramento, California and Omaha, Nebraska on a map. These were the start and end points of the first transcontinental railroad.
  2. *Draw a line on a map, as best you can, of where the railroad traveled.  (click on US continental, 1 page, print)
  3. Place the map in your history notebook.

M*

  1. Move cursor over photos to read about the people. Click to read more.
  2. *Print out map and label each route with the name of the man in charge of that railroad.
  3. Cut out the transcontinental railroad piece. Write inside about the railroad inside and place on the 1860s page of your timeline. Or if you don’t like little booklets, you can just cut out the picture and attach it to the page and write on the paper.

Day 5

  1. L and M  Read the News. Write an email to someone and tell them about what you read in the news.

Alexander Graham Bell, Thomas Edison

Day 6(*)

L(*)

History(*)

  1. If it’s available, watch this video on Alexander Graham Bell. If not, use the assignment below.
  2. Watch a video about Alexander Graham Bell and *choose some activities to complete from this packet. (On Day 7 they will do pages 10 and 40.)

M

  1. Watch 30 minute movie about Alexander Graham Bell.

Day 7

L*

  1. Read this biography of Alexander Graham Bell
  2. *Print pages 10 and 40 and any others you like. Answer the questions on page 10 and page 40 as best as you can. You can check your answers on page 46 to learn more about Mr. Bell.
  3. Cut out timeline piece and write inside about Alexander Graham Bell. What were his accomplishments? What did he care about?

M

  1. Read biography of Alexander Graham Bell.  It continues on this page. You can click on the pictures to see them bigger.
  2. Write about his life. What do you admire about him? What were his accomplishments? What did he care about? Use the piece from the timeline to write inside.
  3. Look at these different diagrams of how to build a telephone like Bell’s. We hear sound because of vibrations. Your voice creates the vibrations. Mr. Bell figured out how to turn those vibrations into bursts of electricity that travel through the wires. Diagram one  Diagram two   It’s not so complicated, is it? His big discovery was how liquid, specifically an acid (like vinegar), made the vibrations stronger and clearer. In science this year we will learn more about acids, electricity, vibrations and sound.

Day 8

L

  1. Read biography of Edison
  2. Cut out and write in Edison’s timeline piece and add it to your timeline.

M

  1. Read chapter 1 and 2  of The Boy’s Life of Edison
  2. Write a summary of each chapter in a sentence or two. Type them onto a power point slide for each chapter. Record your voice reading the slide. You can get some pictures for some of your slides from Wikipedia.

Day 9

L*

  1. *Copy Edison’s quote. Then explain what it means. Print out — Edison Quote Notebooking Page.
  2. Watch the videos below and look at the list of all of Edison’s inventions.

M

  1. Read chapter 3 and 4 of The Boy’s Life of Edison
  2. Write a summary of each chapter in a sentence or two. Make a power point slide for each chapter. Record your voice reading the slide.

Day 10

L

  1. Read the News  (alternate news site) Tell someone about what you learned in the news today.
  2. If you can read fifth grade level books and are interested in Edison, you could read this story of his life, The Boy’s Life of Edison.

M

  1. Read a news article. Tell someone about what you learned in the news today.
  2. Read chapter 5 and 6 of The Boy’s Life of Edison
  3. Write a summary of each chapter in a sentence or two. Make a power point slide for each chapter. Record your voice reading the slide.

Day 11

L

  1. Watch this video about Thomas Edison. Here’s an alternate link if that one disappears.
  2. If those disappear on us, here are some alternatives.

M

  1. Read chapter 7 and 8 of The Boy’s Life of Edison
  2. Write a summary of each chapter in a sentence or two. Make a power point slide for each chapter. Record your voice reading the slide.

Day 12

L

  1. Answer these questions as best you can about when Thomas Edison invented the light bulb. If you know how to type, then type your answers into the computer. Who? What? Where? When? How? Why? For instance who is Thomas Edison or Edison and Watson. What is that he invented the light bulb. These are the questions you ask and answer when you write a story for the newspaper.

M

  1. Read chapter 9 and 10 of The Boy’s Life of Edison
  2. Write a summary each chapter in a sentence or two. Make a power point slide for each chapter. Record your voice reading the slide.

Day 13

L

  1. Write a sentence to introduce a news story about Edison inventing the light bulb. (Example–don’t copy!–Thomas Edison invented many things, but one changed the world the most.) Put these sentences in the same place you put your answers from yesterday.
  2. Write a sentence about what you think about Edison or his invention. (Example–don’t copy!–I think Edison’s hard work paid off.)

M

  1. Read chapter 11 and 12 of The Boy’s Life of Edison
  2. Write a summary of each chapter in a sentence or two. Make a power point slide for each chapter. Record your voice reading the slide.

Day 14

L

  1. Write your news story. Start with your introduction sentence. Then write in sentences your answers to the who, what, where, when, why and how questions. Then write your final sentence. If you have time, add a title and a picture. Show it to someone.

M

  1. Read chapter 13 and 14 of The Boy’s Life of Edison
  2. Write a summary each chapter in a sentence or two. Make a power point slide for each chapter. Record your voice reading the slide.

Day 15

L

  1. Read the News  (alternate news site). Choose an article and write (or tell someone) the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.

M

  1. If you have younger siblings, read their news articles on Edison.
  2. Read chapter 15 and 16 of The Boy’s Life of Edison
  3. Write a summary of each chapter in a sentence or two. Make a power point slide for each chapter. Record your voice reading the slide. Show your presentation to your family. (You can read the rest of the book on your own if you like.)
  4. Cut out your Edison timeline piece and add it to your timeline. Write inside!

Helen Keller, Industrial Revolution (Coal Mines)

Day 16

L

  1. Read this short biography of Hellen Keller. It mentions the book she wrote. You are going to be reading it. And you can start now.
  2. Read chapter 1 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller.  If you cannot read it on your own (that’s okay, it’s not easy), you can listen while you read along. Or you don’t have to read at all, just sit back and listen. Go to the “listen” link and click on chapter 1.
  3. Tell someone about Helen Keller.

M

  1. Photo from the coal mines.
  2. Watch this video about coal mining today.
  3. About coal mining: Coal was needed in vast quantities for the Industrial Revolution. For centuries, people in Britain had made do with charcoal if they needed a cheap and easy to acquire fuel. What ‘industry’ that existed before 1700, did use coal but it came from coal mines that were near to the surface and the coal was relatively easy to get to. The Industrial Revolution changed all of this.Before the Industrial Revolution, two types of mines existed : drift mines and bell pits. Both were small scale coal mines and the coal which came from these type of pits was used locally in homes and local industry.However, as the country started to industrialise itself, more and more coal was needed to fuel steam engines and furnaces. The development of factories by Arkwright and the improvement of the steam engine by Watt further increased demand for coal. As a result coal mines got deeper and deeper and coal mining became more and more dangerous.Coal shafts could go hundreds of feet into the ground. Once a coal seam was found, the miners dug horizontally. However, underground the miners faced very real and great dangers. Flooding was a real problem in mine explosive gas (called fire damp) would be found the deeper the miners got. One spark from a digging miner’s pick axe or candle could be disastrous poison gas was also found underground pit collapses were common; the sheer weight of the ground above a worked coal seam was colossal and mines were only held up by wooden beams called props.  (from http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/coal_mines_industrial_revolution.htm)
  4. Read chapters 1 and 2 of Facing Death

Day 17

L

  1. Read chapter 2 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller.  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.
  2. Here are pictures of Hellen Keller to look at.

M*

  1. Read chapters 3 and 4 of Facing Death
  2. Industrial Revolution — coal was an important part of running all these new factories. Farming was no longer the main economy of the country. We were producing more from factories now and coal was the fuel for those factories. Here’s a picture of kids working in a mine.
  3. Use this Coal mines notebooking page to write as if you were a worker in a coal mine. Use what you’ve learned about coal mines and the time period and write a paragraph about your life as a coal mine worker. Use the blank box for your title.

Day 18

L*

  1. Read chapter 3 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.
  2. *Use this Helen Keller notebooking page. Copy the quote. Use the other space to write who Helen Keller was.

M

  1. Read chapters 5 and 6 of Facing Death
  2. Watch this video on the industrial revolution.
  3. Interview a younger sibling who is learning about Helen Keller or read this short biography.

Day 19

L

  1. Read chapter 4 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.
  2. Watch this video on the industrial revolution. Tell someone about how life changed for Americans.

M

  1. Watch this video on the industrial revolution. Write in your notebook what an agrarian society is and what an industrial society is. Also write what technology made the industrial revolution possible.
  2. Read chapters 7 and 8 of Facing Death.

Day 20

L

  1. Read the News   (alternate news site). Choose an article and write (or tell someone) the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. Read chapter 5 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.
  3. Maybe over the weekend you’d like to watch this 20 minute animated movie about Helen Keller. Here’s the link to the first part on youtube. Get permission to watch this!

M

  1. Read a news article. Write out or tell someone the answers to the journalist’s questions: who, what, where, when, why and how.
  2. Read chapters 9 and 10 of Facing Death.

Henry Ford, Child Labor, Suffrage Movement

Day 21

L

  1. Read chapter 6 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.
  2. Read this biography of Henry Ford.
  3. Cut out and fill in Henry Ford timeline piece.

M

  1. Read chapters 11 and 12 of Facing Death.
  2. Read this biography of Henry Ford.
  3. Cut out and fill in Henry Ford timeline piece.

Day 22

L

  1. Read chapter 7 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.
  2. Look at these pictures of child labor in America. Choose a picture and show it to someone and describe to them what you see. What are they doing? Why do they look the way they do? What do you think they are thinking and feeling? Write your answers or talk with a parent or older sibling about your answers.

M

  1. Read chapters 13 and 14 of Facing Death.
  2. Read this page about child labor in America and look at the pictures. Lewis Hine was a photojournalist. He exposed child labor for what it really was and helped bring about reforms. Write in your notebook what you find most shocking.

Day 23

L

  1. Read chapter 8 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.
  2. Do this activity about learning by looking at old photographs.

M

  1. Read chapters 15 and 16 of Facing Death.
  2. Look at these photographs. Make observations and conclusions. Write about the suffragettes from what you’ve observed. Here’s a women’s suffrage notebooking page photo 1  photo 2   photo 3   photo 4

Day 24

L

  1. Read chapter 9 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.
  2. Look at this old photograph of suffragettes. What details do you see this photograph? Who are the suffragettes? What do they want? (answer: the right to vote) How badly do you think they want it? (hint: check the weather)  Write in your history notebook a sentence about the suffragettes. “The suffragettes were…” You finish the sentence.

M

  1. Read chapters 17 and 18 of Facing Death.
  2. Read this short article about the suffragette movement. How much of this information did you get from looking at the pictures yesterday? Add to or edit your writing from yesterday from what you learned today.

Day 25

L

  1. Read the News  (alternate news site). Choose an article and write (or tell someone) the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. Read chapter 10 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.

M

  1. Read a news article. Write out or tell someone the answers to the journalist’s questions: who, what, where, when, why and how.
  2. Read chapters 19 and 20 of Facing Death.

Theodore Roosevelt, Immigration

Day 26

L

Reading

  1. Read this biography of Theodore Roosevelt.
  2. Read chapter 11 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.

Writing

  1. Theodore Roosevelt saved a lot of wilderness. He protected it to keep people from using the forests, rivers, etc. for business or for homes. Write about why you think it’s important to protect nature as it is. You should begin with a introduction sentence, a sentence that tells what you are going to write about. For instance…”I think it is very important to protect nature.”

M

  1. Read this biography of Theodore Roosevelt.
  2. Read chapters 21 and 22 of Facing Death.
  3. Write a paragraph about why it is important to protect nature. Theodore Roosevelt was a naturalist. He preserved wilderness as national parks so that we have natural spaces free from homes and business. (clean air, clean water…what other reasons…)
  4. Do you need tips on writing a proper paragraph?  topic sentence   supporting details   closing sentence
  5. If you like Theodore Roosevelt and want to read more, he wrote an autobiography and there is a biography about him.

Day 27

L

  1. Watch video on immigration.
  2. Read chapter 12 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.

M

  1. Watch video on immigration and Ellis Island.
  2. Read chapters 23 and 24 of Facing Death.

Day 28

L*

  1. Read about the Statue of Liberty.
  2. Read chapter 13 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.
  3. *Color this picture of the Statue of Liberty and/or copy this quote from the Statue of Liberty.

M*

  1. Read this page about the Statue of Liberty including Emma Lazarus’ poem.
  2. Read chapters 25 and 26 of Facing Death.
  3. *Print out this notebooking page, Statue of Liberty quote. What is the meaning of this poem? What is its invitation?
  4. Practice saying this part of the poem out loud. Stand up in front of your family and read this poem. Say it like you mean it!

Day 29

L

  1. Watch this video showing what it was like to build the Statue of Liberty.
  2. Watch this video about what it was like to come as an immigrant through Ellis Island.
  3. People came to America to find freedom: freedom to worship God their way, freedom from discrimination, freedom from poverty, and whatever other problem their families were facing. They were searching for a better life. Were their first experiences better? What do you think they were thinking of America when they arrived at Ellis Island?
  4. Read chapter 14 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.

M

  1. Read these stories about coming to Ellis Island.
  2. Was life easy for new immigrants? What was it like for them?
  3. Read chapters 27 and 28 of Facing Death.

Day 30*

L

  1. Read the News  (alternate news site).  Choose an article and write (or tell someone) the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. Read chapter 15 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.
  3. Write or tell about why you think Helen Keller is important.

M*

  1. Finish of Facing Death.
  2. *Fill out a book report form for Facing Death.

Maybe your family would like to watch The Miracle Worker, a Disney movie about Helen Keller. Here’s the link to the first part on youtube. Get permission to watch this!

If your looking for more books to read, check out the tons of Alger books listed under level 5. These fit the time period.

The Wright Brothers and other flyers

Day 31
L

  1. Watch this video on the Wright Brothers.
  2. If that video disappears, you can watch these animated movie clips about the Wright Brothers and this old-time film.
  3. Cut out your timeline piece. Draw/write about what you learn.

M*

  1. Read this comic book about the Wright Brothers (you have to click on “Next Page.)
  2. Watch this short video which I believe is from a flight demonstration in 1908.
  3. Draw/write about what you learned. Use a notebooking page with a blank top for drawing.

Writing

  1. Read this example of a “persuasive essay.” It means they are writing to convince someone to do something.
  2. Last week you wrote a persuasive paragraph. Reading this essay, can you think of ways to improve your paragraph? If you need to, do a little research so you can include some real facts.
  3. Rewrite your paragraph and make it better, include more detail. Make your introduction and conclusion more interesting.

Day 32

L*

  1. Read about Amelia Earhart.
  2. *Write about Amelia Earhart.  Amelia Earhart notebooking page
  3. Read chapter 16 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.

M*

  1. Read about Amelia Earhart.
  2. Write about her life.  Amelia Earhart Notebooking Page

Day 33

L

  1. Read about Bessie Coleman.
  2. Tell someone about Bessie Coleman.
  3. Read chapter 17 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.

M

  1. Read about Bessie Coleman.  Write about her life.  Bessie Coleman Notebooking Page

Day 34

L

  1. Read about Charles Lindbergh.
  2. Tell someone about Charles Lindbergh.
  3. Read chapter 18 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.

M

  1. Read about Charles Lindbergh.
  2. Write about his life.  Charles Lindbergh Notebooking Page

Day 35

L

  1. Read the News  (alternate news site). Choose an article and write (or tell someone) the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. Read chapter 19 of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.

M

  1. Read the News. Choose an article and write (or tell someone) the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.

World War I

Day 36

L

  1. Watch this video on airplanes in WWI.
  2. Read chapter 20  of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.

M

  1. Read about where airplanes went from the time of the Wright brothers OR watch this video on airplanes in WWI.

Day 37

L*

  1. *Print out map (click on Europe). Color in Turkey, Germany, France, Russia, Serbia, Hungary and Austria. Color each a different color and write their names in that color on the back of the map. Your list of colorful names is your map key.
  2. If you need a map to look at, here is one online.
  3. Read chapter 21  of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.

M**

  1. Read chapter 1 of The Little Book of the War.
  2. *Print out a map (click on Europe) and label the countries and bodies of water mentioned. Create a key if necessary.
  3. *Also print out 11 copies of your favorite WWI notebooking page and take notes on each chapter.
  4. Two books you could consider reading just for fun over the next several weeks (to day 65) are Rilla of Ingleside (audio book) which is about life on the home front and is from the Anne of Green Gables  series and Air Service Boys Over Enemy Lines.

Day 38

L*

  1. *Print out another map of Europe. (You’ll notice this one is different. This is what the country borders looked like in 1914.)
  2. Write “European Alliances Before WWI.” That just means which countries in Europe were friends and agreed to help each other.
  3. Choose two colors.
  4. With one color, color in France, Britain, Serbia and Russia.
  5. With the other color, color in Austria-Hungary and Germany.
  6. Color neatly. Do the best you can.
  7. Here’s a map to help you. (Again, this is a map of 1914. Countries break up and get smaller or take on other countries and get bigger.)
  8. Read chapter 22  of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.

M*

  1. Read chapter 2 of The Little Book of the War.
  2. Take notes and keep marking your map. This book can be sparse on dates. Here is a concise timeline to help you out as your read. (Remember, no clicking on ads!)
  3. *Print out another map of Europe. (This is a map from 1914. Your other one is more modern day.)
  4. Read this sheet about European Alliances Before WWI and color this map to show the alliances, who was on whose side. Label the map with a title and the date. Work neatly. Do your best!
  5. Need help? Here’s a map from 1914.
  6. When the war starts, this is what the “sides” look like.

Day 39

L*

July 28th

Austria declared war on Serbia
  August 1st Germany declared war on Russia
August 3rd  Germany declared war on France and invaded Belgium. Germany had to implement the Schlieffen Plan.
 August 4th Britain declared war on Germany
  1. Look at this chart above. It’s a list of dates of when certain countries declared war on other countries at the beginning of WWI.
  2. *Print out another map! Draw on who is declaring war on whom. Maybe you could draw an arrow from Britain to Germany. Draw an arrow for each country declaring war on another country. This all happened in about 8 days in 1914.
  3. Put a title on your map, “Declares War 1914″ might be a good one.
  4. Read chapter 23  of The Story of My Life: Helen Keller  If you need help, you can listen while you read along. Just click on the chapter number.

M*

  1. *Complete this worksheet, WWI political cartoon.
  2. Read chapter 3 of The Little Book of the War. Take notes.

Day 40*  (A book your family might want to read is The Singing Tree. It is not required. It is an award winning historical fiction novel about WWI. It is 5th grade reading level with an interest level of 3rd – 5th grade — according to a website. )
L*

  1. Cut out timeline piece on the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand. Write inside. He was assassinated in Sarajevo and was next in line to become King in Austria. His murder is considered the spark that started the war.
  2. Read the News   (alternate news site). Choose an article and write (or tell someone) the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  3. If you aren’t reading The Singing Tree, you could read one of two other books. These are optional. These books are harder so you should listen to it read to you or listen as you read along. There is a book about women and children on the home front which is Rilla of Ingleside from the Anne of Green Gables series. This has an audio book you can listen to. You can read a chapter a day except for a handful of chapters you’ll need to read on the weekends. Or you could read a boy book which does not have an audio book with it. It’s called, Air Service Boys Over Enemy Lines. You can read a chapter a day.
  4. *Here’s a book report page to fill out after you finish reading whatever you are reading. WWI Book Report

M*

  1. Cut out timeline piece on the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand. Write inside.
  2. Read an article. *Fill in the chart.

Day 41

L*

  1. Watch this lesson about countries declaring war in 1914 and 1915.
  2. *Color a map to match the one in the lesson. Title for the map, “WWI Expands”

M

  1. Watch this lesson about countries declaring war in 1914 and 1915.
  2. Label a map to show the sides–who is in which alliance, and label what year each country joined the war.

Day 42

L*

  1. *Print out this worksheets and cut out the squares. Put them in the order that makes the most sense. You can glue them down in order on a sheet of plain paper if you want to keep it in your binder.

M

  1. Complete this lesson on the causes of WWI. Keep click on continue. Hit the back button if you need to go read something again.

Day 43

L*

  1. *Color this picture of a plane from WWI. Why is it called a tri-plane?
  2. Look at these photos of WWI airplanes.

M

  1. Read chapter 4.
  2. Read about planes in WWI.
  3. Write about one of the planes used. You can draw it too if you like (these are notebooking pages with space for drawing). Do you remember that the Wright brothers sold their plane design to the government to use for warfare?

Day 44

L*

  1. *Color this picture of a Canadian soldier in WWI. Read what it says.
  2. Watch the soldiers in training.

M

  1. Read chapter 5. Remember to take notes.
  2. Take a look at the uses of trenches in WWI. Click on the different places in the diagram for a picture and description.
  3. Take the trenches quick quiz.

Day 45

L*

  1. Read the vocabulary on page 4.  (Ls are using all but the wordsearch and crossword puzzles.)
  2. Watch Songs of World War I while you work on number 3.
  3. Do the vocabulary matching on page 9.

M*

  1. Read the vocabulary on page 4.  (M is just using pages 4 and 7, although 4 could be read online.)
  2. Watch Songs of World War I while you work on number 3.
  3. Do the vocabulary crossword on page 7.

Day 46

L*

  1. *Fill in this worksheet on the causes of WWI. The “Triple Entente” was the name given to the alliance between Britain, France and Russia. So, what countries make up the “Triple Alliance?”

M*

  1. *Fill in this worksheet on the causes of WWI. Answer the questions under “Levels 5 and 6.”

Day 47

L

  1. Take a look at this diagram of trenches used in WWI. Click on the different areas of the diagram for pictures and descriptions.
  2. Draw a diagram of a trench.
  3. Read about weapons used in the war.
  4. Take the weapons quick quiz.

M

  1. Read chapter 6 and chapter 7. Take notes.

Day 48

L

  1. Read about Zeppelin raids.
  2. Take the quick quiz.
  3. Make this minibook about WWI warfare. (page 2)

M

  1. Read chapter 8 and chapter 9. Take notes.

Day 49

L

  1. Read this online book.
  2. Make the minibook and put it on your timeline. (page 1)

M

  1. Read chapter 10. Take notes.
  2. Read this online book to review.
  3. Make a list of what you think are the key things to remember about WWI.

Day 50*

L *

  1. Read the News  (alternate news site). Choose an article and write an email (or tell someone) the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. *Choose an event related to WWI and fill in this news graphic organizer.

M

  1. Read the News. Choose an article and write an email (or tell someone) the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. Choose an event related to WWI and fill in this news graphic organizer. Hold onto it.

Day 51

L

  1. Read about the end of the war.
  2. Take the quick quiz.
  3. List for a parent as many facts as you can about WWI.

M

  1. Read chapter 11 (postscript).
  2. Make sure to include “armistice” on your timeline. Write a definition of the word along with it.
  3. Take the quick quiz.

Day 52

L

  1. Read about the Treaty of Versailles, this is the agreement the countries made to end the war.
  2. Take the quick quiz.
  3. Cut out and fill in the timeline piece.

M

  1. Read the terms of peace, or President Wilson’s 14 points. They were rejected, but his League of Nations was established.
  2. Read about the actual Treaty of Versailles.  Click on next.
  3. Read about the countries’ opinions on the treaty.
  4. What about the treaty made Germany so mad? (Give more than one answer and write in complete sentences.) You can write in the timeline piece if you like.
  5. Cut out and attach the timeline piece. (and write inside!)

Day 53*

L

  1. Read this page and look at the chart showing how much the countries’ did not like the treaty.
  2. Look at these maps from before and after the war.
  3. *Color in this map to show what used to be Germany and what used to be Austria-Hungary.   Map of Europe After Versailles
  4. Write a title on your map.

M*

  1. Watch/listen/do this online activity on the League of Nations and the years following WWI.
  2. Look at this map from after the war.
  3. *Color in this map to show what new countries formed. Map of Europe After Versailles
  4. Here’s a pre-war map if you need it. Remember only the dark, thick dotted lines show country borders.
  5. Label your map with a title.

Day 54

L

  1. Read about Rememberence Day.
  2. Here are some pictures of Flander’s Field which is now a cemetery.
  3. Here is an artist’s painting of the poem.
  4. Choice: either draw/paint how the poem describes Flander’s Field, or read/perform the poem in front of an audience.

M

  1. Look at these political cartoons from WWI (their captions are written small underneath them). You can read descriptions of them on the right.
  2. Which one do you think is the most effective? Describe it, tell what the point is and why it is effective in making its point.
  3. Listen to this famous WWI poem called, In Flander’s Field, the name of a cemetery.

Day 55

L

  1. Type up your facts from last week with a title. Write your facts in this fashion. Who: George Washington  What:  …

M

  1. Write a news article using your notes from Day 50.
  2. Here are examples and an outline of what an article should look like.
  3. Don’t stress about it. Work quickly. Write your opening line, include your facts, and write your conclusion.

Day 56

L/M

  1. Put together a newspaper.
  2. Use your news article from Day 55. If you have another story about WWI that you wrote for English, you can use that as your second article. If not, you can list a timeline of events for your second article.

The Roaring Twenties

Day 57

L

  1. Read about the 1920s. Write down a few interesting facts on your timeline.

M

  1. Read “World News” and take notes on your timeline.
  2. Read chapter 1 of Animal Farm. This is an allegory about the Russian Revolution that took place during the end of WWI. The animals are those who revolted against the government. Their leaders convince them it is for their benefit, but really it was only for their own benefit.

Day 58

L

  1. Click on a world leader. Write something about the leader on your timeline. There are blank timeline pieces for you to use.

M

  1. Read “Finance” and take notes on your timeline.
  2. Read chapter 2 of Animal Farm. Describe what’s happening in the book to someone.

Day 59

L

  1. Choose an entertainer to read about and add a fact to your timeline.  There are blank timeline pieces for you to use.

M

  1. Read “Science and Technology” and take notes on your timeline.
  2. Read chapter 3 of Animal Farm. Describe what’s happening in the book to someone.

Day 60*

L

  1. Look at pictures  from the 1910s.  Just look at page one (otherwise not everything is from that time period).
  2. Look at pictures  from the 1920s.  Just look at page one (otherwise not everything is from that time period).
  3. What differences can you find? Click on the pictures to see them more closely. (Hint: look at lengths)
  4. *Print out and color in this page of 20s clothing from England.

M

  1. Read either “Sports” or “Arts and Literature” and take notes on your timeline.
  2. Read chapter 4 of Animal Farm. Describe what’s happening in the book to someone.

Day 61

L

  1. Read the first paragraph about jazz. It says that jazz musicians use improvisation. It tells you what that word means in the second line.  What does it mean?
  2. Listen to some jazz and read about some jazz artists.
  3. Want to play with a jazz band? Click on play and then choose jazz style.
  4. Are you interested in hearing more jazz music and learning more about it? Get permission to go to youtube and watch this video.

M*

  1. Read “Life” and take notes on your timeline.
  2. *How is life today similar or different from the 20s. Venn Diagram
  3. While you work, play some jazz music from the 20s.  some more   some blues    some church music
  4. Read chapter 5 of Animal Farm. Describe what’s happening in the book to someone.
  5. Are you interested in hearing more jazz music and learning more about it? Get permission to go to youtube and watch this video.

Radio

Day 62

L

  1. Listen to the first half of this radio show of a book called, The Biscuit Eater. Stop after 14 minutes.
  2. Notice the sound effects and how they use their voice to act even though you can’t see them. It’s a story of ( a boy who trains a dog to be a bird hunter. His father trains dogs too. In the final competition, the boy has his dog lose on purpose because he sees how much it means to his father, but his father realizes it. Highlight to read the summary if you think it would be helpful to you, but it tells you the ending!)

M

  1. Listen to the first half of this radio show of the book, The War of the Worlds. 
  2. Notice the sound effects and voice acting.
  3. This is a very famous radio broadcast. They told the story of an alien invasion as a news broadcast so that people thought it was really happening and many actually fled their homes. They have music playing like the radio show is really a music broadcast that is interrupted with these news reports.

Day 63

L

  1. Listen to the second half of The Biscuit Eater. Click in the middle and start at 14 minutes.

M

  1. Listen to the second half of The War of the Worlds
  2. You are going to be writing a radio show. You can think about what it will be.

Day 64

L

  1. Choose a story you have written to use as a radio broadcast. Or, you can choose a short book or part of a book.
  2. Plan out how you will include sound effects.

M

  1. Read about radio sound effects.
  2. Write a short radio show. You can use a story you have written, or write a new one, or maybe an easy thing to do would be a commercial. Choose places to add sound effects and figure out how you will do them.
  3. Read chapter 6 of Animal Farm. Describe what’s happening in the book to someone.

Day 65

L

  1. Read your radio show. Remember to act it out with your voice and to add sound effects. Perform it for an audience (can just be your family).
  2. If you have read a WWI book, finish your book report ( WWI Book Report).

M

  1. Read about radio scripts.
  2. Read your radio show. Do the different voices and sound effects. Perform it for an audience. (You could record it if you wanted so that you can play it like a real radio show.)
  3. Read chapter 7 of Animal Farm. Describe what’s happening in the book to someone.
  4. Read about the allegorical characters in the book and the real-life characters they were a metaphor for. Scroll down to “characters.”

The Great Depression

Reading Suggestions: These are not required. In order from youngest to oldest: The Babe and I, The Gardener, Turtle in Paradise, A Year Down Yonder. A free book you can read online or download is Fame and Fortune by Horatio Alger. Though written earlier, Alger’s books were immensely popular during the depression. There are many of them, and they all share the theme of a poor man turning his life around. It was just the kind of inspiration people were looking for. Read online or download  Audio book  (23 chapters 5th grade? reading level)

Day 66

L*

  1. Read the first section of this lesson on the Great Depression.  (The first page and a half. Stop at “Life During the Great Depression.”
  2. *Print out these president minibooks and cut out and fill in the one on President Hoover and place it on your timeline.

M

  1. *Read this lesson on the Great Depression and print out pages 5 and 6. Answer the questions on page 5 and write a complete answer to number 11 on page 6.
  2. Read chapter 8 of Animal Farm. Describe what’s happening in the book to someone.

Day 67

L*

  1. Read “Life During the Great Depression” starting on the second page.
  2. Print out this minibook and write about the effects of the Depression. You can add it to your timeline.

M*

  1. Read through this website on the Depression – three tabs along the top. Read some of the letters to the president.
  2. Watch Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s inaugural address, his speech when he became president.
  3. *Cut out and fill in president Roosevelt‘s minibook. (You can do Hoover too if you like.) Add to your timeline.
  4. Read chapter 9 of Animal Farm. Describe what’s happening in the book to someone.

Day 68

L

  1. Read the fourth page about “New Deal.
  2. Cut out and write in FDR’s president minibook. You can add it to your timeline.

M

  1. Watch the first half hour of this documentary on the great depression and riding the rails: part 1 and part 2.

Day 69

L

  1. Read about the dust bowl.
  2. Explain to a parent or older sibling what the dust bowl was and what life was like for people living there.

M

  1. Read about the dust bowl.
  2. See pictures of a dust storm.
  3. Read a poem. Perform the poem for your family or friends. (If you want to print it out, click here.)
  4. Read chapter 10 of Animal Farm. Describe what’s happening in the book to someone.

Day 70

L*

  1. Read the News  (alternate news site). Choose an article and write an email (or tell someone) the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. *Print out this newspaper assignment and fill it in.

M*

  1. Read the news.  Choose an article and write an email (or tell someone) the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. *Print out and complete this newspaper assignment.
  3. Write a description of how the animal’s leaders were able to carry out the revolution.  Animal Farm notebooking page

Suggested Reading for World War II:  These are NOT required. WWII and Communism which followed  Gladys Aylward, Brother Andrew; Jews — Ten and Twenty, Number the Stars, The Hiding Place  (youngest to oldest); Other — Navajo Code Talkers  middle school, Farewell to Manzanar ages 10+ (most of these are available on Kindle) Our study of WWII lasts 50 days, so there is lots of time to finish your Depression book, if you are reading one, and to read a couple of these as well.

Day 71

L

  1. Read this page about the start of WWII.
  2. Listen to the speech.
  3. Start a WWII timeline with the information you learned today. Here’s a paper one. Here’s an online one. You have to sign up to use the online one for it to remember you and save your timeline. If you have more than one student using it, each would need his own account.

M

  1. Read this page recounting the beginnings of WWII. This is a long page, but not lots of writing. Take your time to look at the pictures.
  2. Write down or tell someone what was happening during this time. You don’t have to know all the details, but in general, what is taking place.
  3. Start a WWII timeline with at least one thing you found most important from the information you learned today. Here’s a paper one. Here’s an online one. You have to sign up to use the online one for it to remember you and save your timeline. If you have more than one student using it, each would need his own account.
  4. Read this Wikipedia page on Animal Farm.

Day 72

L/M

  1. *Print out the map of the world. Print 2 so you can use one tomorrow (L and M are using this map).
  2. Color in the countries on the list with two colors. Use one color for the axis and one color for the allies.
  3. Write a key to show which color is which.
  4. Write a title on your map.
  5. Here’s an online map of the world if you need it.

Day 73

L

  1. *Print out a map of the world.
  2. Read about the leaders of WWII.
  3. Write the last name of each main leader in the country they led. Only write the main leader for countries where two are listed.

M

  1. *Print out a map of the world.
  2. Read about the leaders of WWII.
  3. Write the last name of each main leader in the country they led. Only write the main leader for countries where two are listed.
  4. Read about Hitler as a boy.  Answer in complete sentences. Does reading this make you think of him as just a person like the rest of us? What events of his childhood do you think affected who he became as an adult? Did anything surprise you about his childhood? what?
  5. Add to your timeline whatever you deem important. Not every date you come across should go on your timeline.
  6. Keep Animal Farm in mind as you read about this generation of dictators. How would the characters apply during WWII?

Day 74   Today the children will be reading about the evacuation of children during WWII. This is what happens at the beginning of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. You can consider reading the book or watching the movie.

L*

  1. Read about the evacuation of children during WWII.
  2. Write your feelings on the subject. Use this notebooking page and answer the question. evacuation

M*

  1. Read about the evacuation of children during WWII.
  2. Write your feelings on the subject. Use this notebooking page and answer the question. evacuation during WWII
  3. Decide whether or not you want to add anything to your timeline.

Day 75

L/M

  1. Read the News. Choose an article and write an email (or tell someone) the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.

Day 76

L*

  1. Print out this coloring page. Make sure you color the flags correctly. This is Roosevelt with the American flag, Churchill with the British flag and Stalin with the old Russian flag. These are the leaders of some of the Allies, the countries that fought against Germany and the Axis countries.
  2. Here is a flag website where you can look up the British and American flags if you need to.

M*

  1. Print out this document (World War Two worksheets) and save the remaining pages. Today complete page 1.

Day 77

L*

  1. Read this timeline up through 1940. Update your timeline.
  2. Print a map. Mark with an X the countries that are controlled by Germany by 1940. Make sure you put a title on your map. Use the information in the timeline. This is a modern map and not all of these countries existed in 1940. You may have to think some about what areas are being controlled.

M

  1. Read this timeline up through 1939. Update your timeline.
  2. Print a map. Mark with an X all the countries that are controlled by Germany by 1940. Make sure you put a title on your map. Use the information in the timeline. This is a modern map and not all of these countries existed in 1940. You may have to think some about what areas are being controlled.

Day 78

L

  1. Make a page with all the flags of the axis countries. Look at this page to find the flags on Germany’s side. (Scroll down and look for the heading. You don’t need “ensigns” or “personal” or “battle” flags. )

M

  1. Do the second page of the picture worksheets you printed out on Day 76.

Day 79

L

  1. Read about the Battle of Britain.
  2. Add it to your timeline along with some information about it.

M

  1. Read about the Battle of Britain.
  2. Read about the blitz.
  3. Take notes on your timeline. Please add information to your timeline, not just “Battle of Britain.”

Day 80

L

  1. Fill in this news organizer for an article on the Battle of Britain.
  2. Read the News  (alternate news site). Choose an article and tell someone the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.

M

  1. Fill in this news organizer for an article on the Blitz.
  2. Read the news.  Choose an article and tell someone the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.

Day 81

L

  1. Listen to an air raid siren from London during WWII.
  2. Listen to a boy describe his experience with the bombing of London.
  3. Listen to a teacher lead a gas mask drill.
  4. Talk with a parent about what you think it would be like to hear sirens, see bombs and wear a gas mask. Maybe together you’d like to read Psalm 91.

M

  1. Listen to this news brief after the Blitz.
  2. Listen to one woman’s experience.
  3. Listen to Winston Churchill.
  4. Write a news broadcast about the Blitz (30 seconds) and perform it as if on the radio.

Day 82

L

  1. Read about women working during the war.
  2. Do you think it was important and necessary for women to work? Do you think it is important and necessary for women to stay at home with their children? Can both be important and necessary? Talk about it with your parents.

M

  1. Do the third page in your packet of picture worksheets about women shopping.

Day 83

L

  1. Read about the home during the war. Use the different links to read about the different rooms and look at the pictures.
  2. What’s different than your home? What’s the same?

M

  1. Read about the role of women in the war.
  2. Do you think it was important and necessary for women to work? Do you think it is important and necessary for women to stay at home with their children? Can both be important and necessary? Write your answers in complete sentences.
  3. Look at this poster from the war. It is a famous piece of propaganda from the war. What is it saying to women? Why did they post this around the country? (answer: It is saying that women are strong and able to work. They wanted women to work and wanted them to think of themselves as capable.)

Day 84

L

  1. Read about rationing during the war.
  2. Read about rationing during the war. Use the links and look at the pictures.
  3. Make a sign to teach people about not wasting. (Here’s an example.)

M

  1. Read about rationing during the war.
  2. Look at these rationing posters. There are many.
  3. Make your own rationing poster.

Day 85

L

  1. Use your organizer from day 80 to write a news article on the Battle of Britain.
  2. Display your finished sign.

M

  1. Use your organizer from day 80 to write a news article on the Blitz.
  2. Display your finished poster.

Holocaust

Day 86

L*

  1. Read about Anne Frank — The Germans wanted to get rid of all the Jews. She was a Jewish girl.
  2. *Record what you learned about Anne Frank on this notebooking page.

M

  1. Read about Anne Frank
  2. Read an excerpt from her famous diary
  3. *Write about Anne Frank on this notebooking page.

Day 87

L

  1. Read this timeline of the Holocaust
  2. Work on your timeline.

M

  1. Read this timeline
  2. Listen to Hitler’s speech in 1939 threatening the Jews.
  3. Notice on the timeline the basic steps that Hitler used against the Jews: propaganda to turn public opinion against them, laws to discriminate against them, star of David to separate them, ghettos to isolate them, deportation to get rid of them.
  4. Work on your timeline.
  5. Choose page 6 or 8 from your picture worksheet packet to complete.

Day 88  (Materials for L: yellow felt or construction paper. safety pin)

L

  1. Watch these two short video clips.   wearing the star of David    the ghetto was a holding place until they were sent to be killed
  2. Can you find Hitler in this picture? Everyone had to raise their arm in salute to him.
  3. Make a star of David to wear.
  • Choose a Star of David craft to make: cutting/folding, making with popsicle sticks

M

  1. Try these four quizzes:
    • Nazification
    • Ghettos
    • Victims
    • You can search for answers by clicking on “Review” at the bottom of each page. You can also learn from finding out the right answer when you click to submit and check each answer.
  2. Choose a star of David craft to make: cuttingfolding–this one is youtube, get permission

Day 89

L

  1. Watch these two video clips:  kids tattooed  getting into freight cars to be taken to a concentration camp
  2. “Starvation of ghetto residents was a deliberate Nazi policy. The amount of food the ghetto was allowed could change from week to week, sometimes from day to day. The official weekly ration for the Jews was very small. At times, it was no more than 1,100 calories a day. Often, not even that much food was made available. For one particular week each Jew was allowed: Bread 14.0 oz., Meat products 4.5 oz., Sugar 1.75 oz., Fat 0.9 oz.. At that rate, the Jewish ration was only about 350 calories a day. A sedentary adult needs about 2,000 calories to maintain his weight. A thirteen-year-old boy needs about 3,000 and a baby needs 1,200. With much less than those amounts, the body loses weight quickly. After a certain point, the body survives by digesting muscle. Painful death from starvation comes not long after that.” 1 oz. is about 30 grams (from http://fcit.coedu.usf.edu/holocaust/activity/35plan/starvati.htm)
  3. List those amounts on this sheet and then look in your kitchen. Look at the weights on the packages and estimate how much of those things you eat each week–consider along with bread all grains including cereal, crackers, rice, etc. Sugar includes all treats, sugar drinks, cookies, etc. Fat includes what you eat with any kind of butter or oil — salad dressing, potato chips.
  4. Finish the sheet.

M

  1. Try these quizzes — Camps   Resistance   Bystanders   Resisters

Day 90

L

  1. Read the News  (alternate news site). Choose an article and tell someone the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. You should also know that Hitler didn’t just discriminate against the Jews. They were just in the most abundance in the European countries he was conquering. He also got rid of people with disabilities, blacks and Roma (Gypsies). Also Christians who helped the Jews were sent to the death camps. Do you think you would risk being sent to a camp in order to save someone else?

M

  1. Read the News. Choose an article and tell someone the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. Do you see anything in the news today that reminds you of Hitler’s steps to get rid of the Jews? Propaganda, laws, separation, isolation, deportation?
  3. You should also know that Hitler didn’t just discriminate against the Jews. They were just in the most abundance in the European countries he was conquering. He also got rid of people with disabilities, blacks and Roma (Gypsies). Also Christians who helped the Jews were sent to the death camps. Do you think you would risk being sent to a camp in order to save someone else?

Pearl Harbor

Day 91

L*  If you have L and M students, print out the whole Pearl Harbor lapbook. L and M will be sharing it. The lapbook uses the British spelling, harbour. Or, just print out the pages you need. Today do page 3 of the lapbook, the wordsearch. Here is an image of a bomber. Here is an image of a destroyer.

M*  Today you will do page 2 of the Pearl Harbor lapbook, definitions. You can just use this as a worksheet, or you can cut and fold it and put it in your notebook or in a sibling’s lapbook.

Day 92

L*  Today you will do page 5 of the Pearl Harbor lapbook. You can use the top of page 7 for a list of words.

M*  Today you will do page 8-9 of the Pearl Harbor lapbook. Make a new cover for it based on the information on the timeline. (That cover is for South Africa.) Add it to your notebook timeline.

Day 93

L*

  1. Today you will do page 10 of the Pearl Harbor lapbook about the ships. You can put this on your timeline.

M*

  1. Today you will read pages 12-14 of the Pearl Harbor lapbook. Choose one of the notebooking pages from the back and write about one of their experiences.

Day 94

L*

  1. Today you will read page 14 of the Pearl Harbor lapbook. You might need someone to read it to you. Either fill out the oral history piece on page 15 or retell the soldier’s story.

M*

  1. Take a look at this website on Theodore Geisel’s (Dr. Seuss) political cartoons. One of them should look familiar. Scroll down to the second cartoon on the page with the ostrich heads and read the paragraph next to it.
  2. Print out this notebooking page on the cartoon and answer the questions.

Day 95

L*

  1. Today you will put together the piece on page 16 of the Pearl Harbor lapbook. You can put this piece on your paper timeline.
  2. Of course, the biggest aftermath of Pearl Harbor was America entering the war. America joined the Allies and fought both Germany and Japan. It also created thousands of jobs in America, wartime jobs. It boosted the economy and made America rich, thoroughly ending the Depression.
  3. Work on your timeline.

M

  1. Read the news.  Choose an article and tell someone the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. Work on your timeline.

Day 96

L*

  1. Color this page. Tell the story of Pearl Harbor. Why is Pearl Harbor so significant? (answer: It got America into WWII.)
  2. Play this axis and allies game. America joined the allies. Who were they fighting alongside? Who were they fighting against? Russia is tricky because they had an agreement to help Germany, but then Germany double crossed them and so they became enemies and fought against Germany.

M

  1. Watch the first twenty minutes of this documentary on China during the period of the first and second World Wars. Stop at about 22:03.
  2. Tell a parent about what you learned.

Day 97

L*

  1. Color the pictures of the axis leaders and label the pictures.
  2. Here is a flag website. Here is Germany’s flag at the time with the image of a swastika on it.

M

  1. Watch the next section of this documentary on China during the period of the first and second World Wars. Start where you left off at 22:03. Stop at 35:43. Please stop it at this point. Do not keep watching.
  2. Tell a parent about what you learned.

Day 98

L*

  1. Print out a map of the world–world 1 will do.
  2. Color all the areas where fighting took place in WWII. Here’s another place to see where the fighting took place.
  3. Here’s a map of the world if you need it.

M

  1. Watch  the next section of this documentary on China during the period of the first and second World Wars. Start at 38:00, not where you left off. Stop at 57:07.
  2. Tell a parent about what you learned.

Day 99

L

  1. Look at this poster.
  2. What is happening to the swastika? The swastika was on the German flag and a symbol for their brand of hate, control and grabbing of power.
  3. What do you think this poster means? Discuss it with a parent.
  4. Look at this graph.
  5. How many people died in Russia/Soviet Union? (answer: almost 24 million)
  6. What about other countries?
  7. The gray line shows percent of population. The graph shows that almost one out of every five people in Poland were killed. What would that mean in your family? (answer: If you have five people in your family, one would have been killed during the war.)

M

  1. Watch the next section of this documentary on China during the period of the first and second World Wars. Start at 57:07 and stop at 1:21:14.
  2. Tell a parent about what you learned.

Day 100

L

  1. Read the News  (alternate news site).  Choose an article and tell someone the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. Go back through your paper timeline with a parent and tell them a little about each item on there.

M

  1. Watch the last section of this documentary on China during the period of the first and second World Wars. Start at 1:21:14 and finish it.
  2. Fill a notebooking page. Write about what you learned about China.

Day 101

L

  1. Listen to President Roosevelt declare war on Japan.

M

  1. Watch these videos on the fight between America and Japan. Video One  Video Two

Day 102

L

  1. Take out the map you colored in of where WWII was fought.
  2. Watch this video on the fight between America and Japan.
  3. Find where this fighting is occurring on your map.

M

  1. Read this timeline of America’s fight with Japan. (You can click on the pictures.)
  2. This is one of the most famous images of the war.
  3. Find which info goes with the picture and write about it on your timeline.

Day 103

L

  1. Read about how Japanese Americans were kept in camps during the war for fear they would help the Japanese.
  2. Take the quick quiz.

M

  1. Read about Japanese internment camps in America. Fearing Japanese spies in America, the American government forced Japanese Americans to live in camps during the war with Japan.
  2. Go to this wikipedia page on the topic. Choose one of the many photographs or images. Click on it. Right click on the new larger image. Click on copy image. Paste it into a word processing document. You probably need to click on it again and drag a corner in to make it smaller. Write on the page about the photo and the internment of Japanese Americans during the war. Print it out.

Day 104

L

  1. Watch this video about the Japanese American internment.

M

  1. Take the quick quiz on Japanese American internment.
  2. Complete the crossword puzzle.

Day 105

L/M

  1. Read the news.  Choose an article and tell someone the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. Work on your timeline.

Day 106

L

  1. Read about pigeons during the war.
  2. Draw a picture of a pigeon carrying a message.
  3. There is a cartoon movie rated G I believe called Valiant which is about carrying pigeons during WWII.

M

  1. Read this essay on the development of technology during WWII.
  2. Explore the darkroom and read about technology developed for the war.
  3. Write on your timeline about two different types of technology used during the war.

Day 107

L*

  1. Watch this video on the enigma machine that coded Germany’s messages. It had more than two and half different combinations (ways it could be set to code). The allies cracked the code, though, gaining invaluable information.
  2. Print out these code wheels. This simplified code maker has twenty-five possible combinations. Cut out the wheels. Place the smaller in the larger. Line up the letters how you choose.
  3. Write a code. Find the letter you need in the smaller circle and write the letter that lines up with it in the bigger circle.
  4. Write your message. Give the decoder to someone and tell them what key to use (A=F for example). See if they figure out the message.

M

  1. Read about the top ten technologies of the war. (Click on top ten list, then the starred top ten list and then on the different choices in the poll to read about them. Vote.)
  2. Write about what you think are the two most important. Describe them and tell why.

Day 108

L

  1. Try this coded messages page. Start with the practice and work down the links. (This can take awhile to load.)

M

  1. Take the technology quiz.
  2. Write what you got wrong. “I learned that…”

Day 109

L

  1. Send a coded message.

M

  1. Read about the Navajo code talkers.
  2. Send a coded message.
  3. Why were the code talkers so important? What was different about their “code” compared to the one in the online activity? (answer: It couldn’t be cracked.)

Day 110

L/M

  1. Read the News. Choose an article and tell someone the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. Work on your timeline. You can add events, pictures, facts…

Day 111

L

  1. Read about the Axis Successes and Failures.
  2. Put these events on your timeline.

M*

  1. Read about the Geneva Convention.
  2. Read about prisoners of war in Japan.
  3. Print out this World War II worksheet and fill in number one.
  4. Watch this animation on the Battle of Dunkirk when France fell to Germany.
  5. You can also read about Dunkirk.
  6. Fill in number two on your worksheet.

Day 112

L

  1. Take the quick quiz.
  2. Do this word search. Click and drag over the word when you find it.

M

  1. Read about Mussolini and the Italians in the War.
  2. Watch this animation on the Italian Campaign.
  3. Fill in number three on your worksheet.
  4. Define blitzkrieg. It’s number four on your worksheet.

Day 113

L

  1. Do this crossword puzzle.

M

  1. Read about U boats.
  2. Fill in number five on your worksheet.
  3. Use this World War II webpage to choose one more topic to read and write about.
  4. Fill in number six on your worksheet.

Day 114

L

  1. Watch this video about the war in Europe.
  2. Get out a map and see if you can show where Germany advanced and conquered and then retreated from until surrender. We’ll learn more about the fall of the Axis powers soon.

M

  1. Use this World War II webpage to choose two more topics to read and write about.
  2. Fill in numbers seven and eight on your worksheet.

Day 115

L

  1. Read the News  (alternate news site). Choose an article and tell someone the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. Work on your timeline. You can add information, pictures… Here’s a place with pictures. (I haven’t looked at all the links. If there’s anything gross, close the page.)

M

  1. Read the news.  Choose an article and tell someone the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. Work on your timeline. Add events from what you studied this week.

Day 116

L

  1. Watch D-Day video.
  2. Find where they landed on a map.

M

  1. Do the D-Day Invasion page in your worksheet packet from Day 76.
  2. Watch D-Day video.
  3. Describe D-Day.  D Day Notebooking Page

Day 117

L

  1. Watch this animation of D Day and of the invasion of Normandy, France. Blue represents the allies.
  2. Do you remember your axis and allies?

M

  1. Watch this news reel about the liberation of cities that followed D-Day.  Warning–dead bodies. You can’t see much, but you see them lying there. You can listen if you don’t want to watch.
  2. Do the V-E day page in your worksheet packet from Day 76.

Day 118

L

  1. Read about these important days.
  2. Click to read more about V-E day.
  3. Make your own timeline piece for VE and VJ days. Add them to your timeline. There are some blank rectangle books in the timeline print out if you want to use one of those, but you can just create your own if you like.

M

  1. Franklin Roosevelt died and Truman took over as President on April 12, 1945.
  2. Watch Truman’s inaugural address.
  3. Read about the atom bomb. Answer the questions.
  4. Do this exercise on why the bomb was dropped.

Day 119

L

  1. Read about the atom bomb. Answer the questions. (You can answer them out loud to a parent.)

M

  1. Now that the war is over, look back. They say, “Hindsight sight is 20/20.” That means it’s easier to know what to do once you already know the results of your decisions. Before the war, Prime Minister of Great Britain, Neville Chamberlain, decided the way to deal with Hitler was by trying to appease him, attempting to meet German grievances in hopes of avoiding war. Read these arguments for and against appeasement. Color code the for and against arguments (you don’t have to follow the directions just mark each blue or red–or whatever colors you choose.) Decide what you think and choose to do either extension 1 or 2.
  2. You have to write to convince them. Have a strong introduction but even stronger conclusion. Leave them convinced that you are right.
  3. Read your speech to your family. Be fiery!

Day 120

L

  1. Work on your timeline. Add your grandparents’ birthdays to the timeline.
  2. Make sure you have D, VE and VJ Day as well as when the atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
  3. Also make sure you include when Roosevelt died and Truman took over as President, April 12, 1945.
  4. Make a paper timeline piece for VE and VJ days.

M

  1. Work on your timeline. Add your grandparents’ birthdays to the timeline.
  2. Make sure you have D, VE and VJ Day as well as when the atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
  3. Also make sure you include when Roosevelt died and Truman took over as President, April 12, 1945.
  4. Make a paper timeline piece for VE and VJ days.
Reading Suggestions for Civil Rights Movement: These are not required. Through My EyesA Tugging String, Linda Brown You Are Not Alone in order  from youngest to oldest. The last one is a collection of short stories and poems.  

Day 121

L

  1. What happens after the war? There are two big things that happen in the fifties, at least from my view point as an American. President Truman signs into law that people of all races and color must be treated equally in the armed forces. He also makes it America’s policy, or you could say America’s job, to protect democracy all over the world. The first of these is a step in what we know as The Civil Rights Movement. The second is about fighting Communism. Since the second has to do with more wars, let’s put that aside for now and learn about the first.
  2. During WWII African Americans had to fight for the right to fight for America. They were given separate training schools and fought separately. That is called segregation, or separation.
  3. Watch this video about the Tuskegee Airmen.
  4. After African Americans fought and died for America, do you think they felt they deserved to be treated like equals after the war?

M

  1. What happens after the war? There are two big things that happen in the fifties, at least from my view point as an American. President Truman signs into law that people of all races and color must be treated equally in the armed forces. He also makes it America’s policy, or you could say America’s job, to protect democracy all over the world. The first of these is a step in what we know as The Civil Rights Movement. The second is about fighting Communism. Since the second has to do with more wars, let’s put that aside for now and learn about the first.
  2. During WWII African Americans had to fight for the right to fight for America. They were given separate training schools and fought separately. That is called segregation, or separation.
  3. Watch part of this video on African Americans in WWII. You don’t have to watch the whole thing. You can stop after twenty minutes. “Mess” means kitchen. They only let blacks work in the kitchen, basically they were allowed to be servants.
  4. You can now do the final worksheet in your packet about African Americans in WWII.
  5. How did fighting in the War inspire African Americans to fight for desegregation (an end to segregation)?
  6. Note: blacks vs. African Americans. African American is the proper, polite term. It shows respect. Black is the color of death, of evil, of mud, etc. However, Blacks/Whites is an accepted way to talk about the issue. When I worked as a teacher at an all black school, I remember one of the teachers saying, “It’s okay. We know we’re black.” They didn’t mind me calling them black because of my attitude toward them. However, the word Negro, which you will see in older books and even hear in this video, is considered discriminatory and abusive. Its use is even outlawed in many places.

Day 122

L

  1. You are going to prepare a presentation on the civil rights movement. You can make a poster, a scrapbook (on paper or online), a lapbook (create your own pieces or use premade) or a power point presentation. (If you have another idea for a project, ask your parents.)
  2. Today add the word segregation on your project. The definition is the separation of racial groups. (Racial groups include Africans, Asians, Native Americans, etc. Race describes someone based on his physical appearance.)
  3. If you are doing a power point, you can add a page with the word and definition on it. If you are doing a lapbook, you can make a piece on it. If you are doing a poster, you can write it in a word processing program to print out and put on your poster later.

M

  1. You are going to prepare a presentation on the civil rights movement. You can make a poster, a scrapbook (on paper or online), a lapbook (create your own pieces or use premade) or a power point presentation. (If you have another idea for a project, ask your parents.)
  2. Write a paragraph for your project about the background to the civil rights movement. Blacks were slaves, then won their freedom, but remained segregated. Blacks fought for and won equal treatment in the military, but remained segregated in daily life. Next we’ll look a little more at what segregation meant.

Day 123

L

  1. Listen to a story about segregation, when blacks and whites were separated in daily life. Click on “All Stories Index” and the story title, “White Socks Only.”
  2. We are going to be learning about how African Americans fought to end segregation. A lot of times they did it by doing what happened in this story, just quietly defying the law. The law in this story was that only white people could drink from the fountain. What did the girl think? How did the others help her?
  3. The laws that segregated the South were called Jim Crow laws. They said that blacks and whites had to have “separate but equal” schools, restaurants, waiting areas, and on and on.
  4. Look at this photograph of white and “colored” drinking fountains. Are the “equal?” It says “colored” not black. Mexicans, Native Americans, etc. were also discriminated against.
  5. Add Jim Crow to your project. You can use pictures from Wikipedia.
  6. If you are working on the computer, make sure you are saving all of your work.

M

  1. Look at this photograph of white and “colored” drinking fountains. It says “colored” not black. Mexicans, Native Americans, etc. were also discriminated against.
  2. Do you notice a difference between the two fountains? The Jim Crow laws of the South established “separate but equal” facilities for whites and blacks. Were they really equal?
  3. Look at these Jim Crow images. What do you see? How far reaching was segregation? How much hate do you think was behind segregation?
  4. Add Jim Crow laws to your project. You can use pictures from Wikipedia.
  5. You might be interested in watching the end of this movie, The Great Debaters based on a true story about the debate team at Wiley College, an all black school. Tomorrow you will learn about the youngest member of their team. His character debates in this clip.

Day 124

L

  1. Look at this photograph. What do you see?
  2. Now read about the photograph.
  3. Now add James Farmer and CORE to your project. You might want to make a label/piece/page called “Civil Rights Organizations.” You’ll be learning about two more organizations.

M

  1. Read about James Farmer.
  2. Add James Farmer and CORE to your project. You might want to make a label/piece/page called “Civil Rights Organizations.” You’ll be learning about two more organizations.
  3. Listen to James Farmer talk about using non-violence to fight discrimination.

Day 125

L

  1. Read the News  (alternate news site). Choose an article and tell someone the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. Is there any news of discrimination today?

M

  1. Listen to this interview about discrimination today and take notes.
  2. Write a paragraph about discrimination today. Intro, at least two points, one counter-point, conclusion

Day 126

L

  1. We learned that James Farmer began an organization called CORE, Congress of Racial Equality. We’re going to learn about a couple of other organizations and their leaders.
  2. NAACP  We read this “N” “Double A” “C” “P.”  It stands for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. It is the oldest civil rights organization. It began in 1909. It is still active today.
  3. Another organization was SCLC, Southern Christian Leadership Conference. It’s famous leader during this period known as the Civil Rights Movement was Martin Luther King, Jr.
  4. Add NAACP and SCLC to your project under Civil Rights Organizations. We’ll learn more about Martin Luther King, Jr.

M

  1. We learned that James Farmer began an organization called CORE, Congress of Racial Equality. We’re going to learn about a couple of other organizations and their leaders.
  2. NAACP  We read this “N” “Double A” “C” “P.”  It stands for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. It is the oldest civil rights organization. It began in 1909. It is still active today. You can explore the timeline a little.
  3. Another organization was SCLC, Southern Christian Leadership Conference. It’s famous leader during this period known as the Civil Rights Movement was Martin Luther King, Jr.
  4. Add NAACP and SCLC to your project under “Civil Rights Organizations.” We’ll learn more about Martin Luther King, Jr.

Day 127

L

  1. One of the biggest early victories for the Civil Rights Movement was the supreme court case, Brown vs. the Board of Education of Topeka Kansas, 1954.
  2. The Supreme Court had ruled that separate schools (and everything else) was legal according to America’s Constitution. This ruling was challenged by the NAACP and others. Thurgood Marshall was their head lawyer. He argued that the Constitution provides equal protection for all of America’s citizens. The Supreme Court this time ruled that “separate but equal” was not allowed in America’s school. They ruled unanimously, which means that every judge agreed. It was a huge victory.
  3. Add Brown vs. The Board of Education to your project.

M

  1. One of the biggest early victories for the Civil Rights Movement was the supreme court case, Brown vs. the Board of Education of Topeka Kansas, 1954.
  2. You can read a little about it here (and read about the NAACP’s first lawyer too, Thurgood Marshall). He became America’s first African American supreme court justice.
  3. Now watch the video about this historic event.
  4. Add Brown vs. the Board of Education to your project.

Day 128

L

  1. Another major event of the Civil Rights Movement was the Montgomery Bus Boycott organized by the SCLC. It began on December 5, 1955 when Rosa Parks refused to sit in the back of the bus. The buses were segregated and blacks had to sit in the back. She refused and was arrested for not giving her seat to a white man. The SCLC organized a boycott of the bus system. No blacks rode the buses for 381 days. The buses lost 60% of its income. Blacks and sympathetic whites organized rides to help people get to work. In the end the segregation laws were changed. It was the start of many nonviolent protests.
  2. Read more about it here.
  3. Do you think you could stay calm if people treated you badly? Why or why not? Why might someone treat you badly? What would you do?
  4. Add the Montgomery Bus Boycott and Rosa Parks to your project. We will be learning about some other Non-Violent Protests.

M

  1. Another major event of the Civil Rights Movement was the Montgomery Bus Boycott organized by the SCLC.
  2. First read about its impetus. Answer the “Think About It” questions. (You can just talk about it with someone instead of writing answers.)
  3. Next, read about the boycott.
  4. Add the Montgomery Bus Boycott and Rosa Parks to your project. We will be learning about some other Non-Violent Protests.

Day 129

L

  1. Here’s another major event of the Civil Rights Movement, the “Little Rock Nine.” They were the first black student enrolled in an all-white high school in Little Rock, Arkansas. Even though the law said the school had to be desegregated, the teachers, students, parents even the governor of Arkansas said no! The governor used troops to stop the students from attending school! President Eisenhower helped out and protected the students so that they could attend school.
  2. Read more about it here (scroll down to the bottom).
  3. How would you feel about being one of those nine? Would you go to school? Why was it important that they went to school?
  4. Add the Little Rock Nine 1957 to your project.

M

  1. Here’s another major event of the Civil Rights Movement, the “Little Rock Nine.” Read about them and add them to your project.
  2. Discuss with your family: How would you feel about being one of those nine? Would you go to school in that situation? Why was it important that they went to school?

Day 130

L/M

  1. Do you remember the names of those involved in the Civil Rights Movement?
  2. Read the news.  Choose an article and tell someone the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  3. Write a new first line to the article you read. What would you use for a hook? (something to catch people’s attention and interest)

Day 131

L

  1. Read about the freedom riders and sit-ins. Add them to your project.

M

  1. Read about the freedom riders and sit-ins.  Add them to your project.

Day 132

L/M

  1. Interview someone who participated either in the freedom rides or in a sit-in (just pretend). Do this with a sibling or give a script to a parent to participate. One person it the interviewer and one person is being interviewed. The interviewer should introduce the newscast and tell what the topic is and a little about what happened and who he/she will be interviewing (and of course, ask the questions).

Day 133

L*

  1. The most famous person associated with the Civil Rights Movement is Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. You don’t need to add him to your project yet.
  2. Go to this website and print out the page so you can fill in the blanks. Click on the link and read about him in order to learn the answers.

M*

  1. The most famous person associated with the Civil Rights Movement is Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. You don’t need to add him to your project yet.
  2. Print out the student worksheet at this cyberhunt site. Use the links to find the answers. (Notice that some of the answers are found on the same page. You might want to look for them all at once.)

Day 134

L

  1. One of the most famous events of the Civil Rights Movement was the March on Washington. More than 200,000 gathered on the Mall in Washington, D.C. on August 28, 1963.
  2. Learn about it and look at the pictures.
  3. Add the March on Washington piece to your paper timeline.

M

  1. Read about one of the most famous events of the Civil Rights Movement, the March on Washington.
  2. Answer the “think about it” questions from “Kids for King.”
    • Dr. King hoped that everyone in the world would want to join his fight for equality if he could gather thousands of people to march in Washington, DC.  What would you most want to march for?  What do you care most about?  What do you want the whole world to know about?

Day 135

L

  1. Watch a portion of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s speech at the March on Washington.
  2. Add Martin Luther King, Jr. to your project.
  3. Maybe you’d like to watch this hour-long cartoon on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

M

  1. Listen to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s speech at the March on Washington. Towards the end listen for the phrases “let freedom ring” and “I have a dream.”
  2. Give this portion of the speech to an audience. Here is a copy of that part of the speech, I Have a Dream.

Day 136

L

  1. Do you remember the names of those involved in the Civil Rights Movement?
  2. Can you match these dates to the events?
  3. Work on your project. Add pictures, design, whatever you like. Make it your best effort. Is everything spelled correctly? Is it neat?

M

  1. Do you remember the names of those involved in the Civil Rights Movement?
  2. Can you match these dates to the events?
  3. Add Martin Luther King, Jr. to your project.

Day 137

L/M

  1. Finish your project.
  2. Present your project to family and friends.
Reading List for Communism:  The Wall: Growing Up Behind the Iron Curtain,   Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution (true story),  Catch a Tiger by the Toe (McCarthyism), from before for WWII  Brother Andrew God’s Smuggler. I listed these youngest to oldest, but you can find Brother Andrew biographies for younger ages. These are optional. Read none or one or all. I tried to pick ones that were available on Kindle so that they could be gotten overseas and read on a computer.

Day 138

L

  1. Now there was another big movement in the 1950s, communism. Communism is when everyone works together to benefit each other. Everyone contributes and everyone receives what they need. It’s actually similar in ways to what the church is supposed to be like, having everything in common so no one has any need (Acts 4:32-35). So what’s wrong with communism? Communist governments aren’t run by Spirit-filled Christians who love the Truth and others more than themselves. They are sinful. They are greedy. They love themselves and don’t care about others. They end up forcing everyone to work for their own benefit. History shows us that under many communist governments the people end up poorer, sometimes starving and in many cases are killed by their governments. Communist governments, in making all men equal, which means you can’t own a home, land, business, etc. It all belongs to the government. They also take away religion.
  2. Watch this video about what government would be like under communism. In the cartoon there is a “snake oil salesman” (someone who convinces people to buy something that doesn’t work) who is selling “ISM.”
  3. After you watch the video…do you know what the big blue hand represents?  (answer: communist government)

M

  1. Read about different types of government. Click on them down the list.
  2. Which ones describe America?
  3. Read about communism. Communism was started by Lenin, or Napolean the pig in Animal Farm.
  4. Watch these two videos about the capitalist way vs. the communist way. After watching them, write or tell about communism from a capitalist prospective (Make Mine Freedom) and write or tell about capitalism from a communist prospective (The Millionaire). Write or tell what do you think?
  5. What is this 1911 propaganda poster about capitalism saying?

Day 139

L

  1. We are going to work on your timeline today.
  2. Add communism to your timeline on the 1950s page.
  3. You also need to add Brown vs. the Board of Education from the Civil Rights Movement.

M

  1. We are going to work on your timeline today.
  2. Add communism to your timeline on the 1950s page.
  3. You also need to add the events from the Civil Rights Movement.

Day 140

L

  1. Communism was begun by a Russian named Lenin. Stalin (whom you read about during WWII) learned from him.
  2. A book called Animal Farm written by George Orwell describes how Lenin took over Russia with communism during the Russian revolution toward the end of WWI. Lenin is the pig, Napolean.
  3. Watch the cartoon movie based on the book. You don’t have to watch during school time. It would be best to watch with a parent.
  4. Look at the ways he uses propaganda (how he uses words, songs, images to make people proud to believe a certain way).
  5. Also pay attention to how individuals no longer work for themselves but for those in charge. In the end the new leaders are just as bad as the old ones.
  6. Talk about those things with your family after the movie.

M

  1. Communism was begun by a Russian named Lenin. Stalin (whom you read about during WWII) learned from him.
  2. The book you read, Animal Farm, written by George Orwell describes how Lenin took over Russia with communism during the Russian revolution toward the end of WWI. Which character is Lenin?  (answer: the pig, Napolean)
  3. Watch the cartoon movie based on the book. You don’t have to watch during school time. Maybe you’d like to watch as a family.
  4. Look at the ways he uses propaganda (how he uses words, songs, images to make people proud to believe a certain way).
  5. Also pay attention to how individuals no longer work for themselves but for those in charge. In the end the new leaders are just as bad as the old ones.
  6. Talk with your family about how Animal Farm portrays communism or write a paragraph about it.

Day 141

L*

  1. Look at this map. Communism was called “the Red Threat.”
  2. *Print out a “World 1″ map and color in red the countries that were controlled by communist leaders.

M

  1. Look at this graph. Communism was called the “Red Threat.” The red on this graph represents the number of people living under communism. The blue represents those living under democracy (at least in terms of getting to vote freely from a choice of people).  During which years does it seem communism was thriving?  (answer: from about 1950 to 1990)
  2. Look at this map of where communism was in the 1950s.
  3. Try this game. I know you don’t know these names. But use your logical thinking skills and play it like a puzzle. Figure out which famous communist leader goes with which country.

Day 142

L

  1. Because America saw communism as such a dangerous threat. They went to war with communism. It was called the Cold War. There were no bombs dropped but there were bombs built. They wanted to scare each other to keep the other from trying anything.
  2. After WWII America sent aid to Europe. By helping those countries America was aiming to keep them from becoming communist countries. This plan was decided by President Truman.
  3. Russia, who was an ally during WWII, now was against America. It was a communist country. Russia would not allow any Eastern European country to take help from America. Those countries became communist countries.
  4. Look at this cartoon. It shows how England and America were now on the opposite side from Russia.
  5. Learn about President Truman. On the games page you can find the ones you can play online by scrolling down.

M*

  1. *Print out these Cold War political cartoons and answer the questions.

Day 143

L

  1. Put President Truman’s timeline piece on your paper timeline.

M

  1. President Truman created the Marshall Plan to stop being an isolationist country (isolated, off by ourselves) to getting involved with the affairs of the world. The plan to stop communism from spreading was called containment.
  2. The Marshall Plan of sending aid to Europe was in effect from 1948-1952.
  3. Put the Truman minibook on your timeline and write about the Marshall Plan.

Day 144

L (*)

  1. Read these facts about President Eisenhower.
  2. Read this timeline about President Eisenhower.
  3. Look at one more page.
  4. (*) Color President Eisenhower. You can color him on paper or online.

M

  1. Read about Korea after WWII. (Just at the top of the page. The same thing repeats.) You don’t have to do the assignment.
  2. Now read about what happened in Korea.
  3. Fill in this notebooking page about the Korean War.  Add a title.

Day 145

L

  1. Read the News   (alternate news site). Choose an article and tell someone the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. Want to see a commercial from 1953?

M

  1. Read about McCarthyism.
  2. Explain to someone about McCarthyism or write a paragraph explain what the term means.

Day 146

L*

  1. *Do this timeline activity. (Parents: the answer key is included in this. If you think your child is too young to figure out the clues, have him cut and glue the pieces onto the answer key)

M*

  1. *Do this timeline activity.

Day 147

L

  1. Read about John F. Kennedy.
  2. Fill in the Apollo 11 timeline piece.
  3. Here is a video of him giving a famous speech.

M*

  1. Read about John F. Kennedy.
  2. *Look at this political cartoon and answer the questions. (Print out only page 1.)  Kennedy and Kruschev
  3. Here is a portion of Kennedy’s inaugural address. You read the most famous quote from it.

Day 148

L

  1. After Kennedy was assassinated Lyndon B. Johnson, his vice president, became the president. He was very interested in helping the poor and furthering civil rights, but his presidency was sidetracked by involvement with a communist conflict in Vietnam. North Vietnam was communist and wanted to unite with South Vietnam. America was scared of communism and did not want it to spread. We helped South Vietnam and eventually sent troops. Many Americans were against this war. Read about it.
  2. Fill in your Vietnam timeline piece.

M

  1. Read about Lyndon B. Johnson.
  2. Read about the Vietnam War.
  3. Fill in your Vietnam War timeline piece.

Day 149

L

  1. We’re going to skip over a few presidents for the moment. The Cold War with Russia and communism dragged on and on. One symbol of communism had been the Berlin Wall. Russia had tried to take over Berlin, Germany. It failed. So, it settled for taking half of it and built a wall to divide the city. People were trapped in East Germany and were not permitted to leave. West Germany with democratic rule became wealthy. East Germany under communist rule was poor. People who tried to escape East Germany were killed. Finally, When George H. W. Bush was president, the wall came down. The Russian ruler at the time was Michael Gorbachev.
  2. Watch the video.
  3. Fill in your Berlin Wall timeline piece.

M

  1. We’re going to skip ahead for the moment. The Cold War with Russia and communism dragged on and on. One symbol of communism had been the Berlin Wall. Read about it. The wall was built in 1961.
  2. In 1989 when George H. W. Bush was president, the wall came down. The Russian ruler at the time was Michael Gorbachev.
  3. Listen to President Reagan tell Gorbachev (Russia’s head at the time) to tear down the Berlin Wall. Bush was his vice president.
  4. You can also see Gorbachev and Bush in this video. You can start after 1 minute. The man speaking Russian is Gorbachev and Bush follows him.
  5. Fill in your Berlin Wall timeline piece.

Day 150

  1. Fill in this news organizer for an article on the Berlin Wall coming down.
  2. Read the news.  Choose an article and tell someone the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.

Day 151

L

  1. Read about Richard Nixon.
  2. View his timeline.
  3. Fill in your timeline piece for him.

M

  1. Read about Richard Nixon.
  2. Put him on your timeline.

Day 152

L

  1. Read about Gerald Ford.
  2. View his timeline.
  3. Fill in your timeline piece for him.

M

  1. Read about Gerald Ford.
  2. Put him on your timeline.

Day 153

L

  1. Read about Jimmy Carter.
  2. View his timeline.
  3. Fill in your timeline piece for him.

M

  1. Read about Jimmy Carter.
  2. Put him on your timeline.

Day 154

L

  1. Read about Ronald Reagan.
  2. View his timeline.
  3. Fill in your timeline piece for him.

M

  1. Read about Ronald Reagan.
  2. Put him on your timeline.
  3. Watch this video on The Tienanmen Square Story about students in China protesting against their limiting government.

Day 155

L

  1. Read the News  (alternate news site). Choose an article and tell someone the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.

M

  1. Read the News. Choose an article and tell someone the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
  2. Use your new organizer to write an article about the Berlin Wall coming down.
Day 156
L
  1. Look at this map of the election results from when Reagan was elected in 1984. The two colors represent the two candidates, the two people running for election. What do you notice?
  2. Look at this map of election results from the 2008 election.  What do you notice?
  3. What has changed over the last 20 years?
  4. Ask your parents about the the red/blue divide in America.
M
  1. Look at this map of the election results from when Reagan was elected in 1984. The two colors represent the two candidates, the two people running for election. What do you notice?
  2. Look at this map of election results from the 2008 election.  What do you notice?
  3. What has changed over the last 20 years?
  4. Ask your parents about the the red/blue divide in America.
  5. Using your parents for information: make a list of issues that define the republicans (red) and democrats (blue).
Day 157
L
  1. Read about George H. W. Bush.
  2. View his timeline.
  3. Add him to your timeline.
M
  1. Read about George H. W. Bush.
  2. Add him to your timeline.
Day 158
L
  1. Read about Bill Clinton.
  2. View the timeline.
  3. Add him to your timeline.
M
  1. Read about Bill Clinton.
  2. Add him to your timeline.
Day 159
L
  1. Read about George W. Bush.
  2. View his timeline.
  3. Add him to your timeline.
M
  1. Read about George W. Bush
  2. Add him to your timeline.
Day 160
L
  1. When you read about President Bush (the younger), you read about 9/11, when terrorists attacked the World Trade Towers in New York City. The US then started the “War on Terror.” The US along with England and other allies decided to fight against terrorists. Soldiers were sent to Afghanistan and then to Iraq. The main target were members of a Muslim group called the Taliban.
  2. The War on Terror is similar to the Cold War because the “enemy” is just a lumped-together group that is hard to identify and because it causes a fear in people of what might happen.
  3. With terrorism, instead of two armies fighting each other, one individual tries to kill or cause damage by surprise. Often “regular” people are killed, not soldiers.
  4. Read these letters by Japanese-American students page 13. They were written the day after Pearl Harbor was bombed. They were about to face a lot of prejudice because of their names and skin. How did they feel about Pearl Harbor?
  5. What is tolerance? How does the one student define it? (answer:  As we know tolerance means to be friendly to other in any way.)
  6. We just read in our Bible reading about not putting up with false teaching. This is different from tolerance. We should not  tolerate, or put up with false teachings or evil practices in the Church, but we are still to be kind and loving. Loving a defiant sinner in the Church means kicking them out of the church so that they will repent! That’s love.
  7. The “War on Terror” has made some people intolerant of Muslims. Because many (not all) terrorists attack have been done by Muslims, they decide all Muslims are bad and turn their fear and hate toward Muslims. Most Muslims will tell you they think the terrorists are doing evil things.
  8. Even the true terrorists are God’s creations. Jesus died for them. God is able to save them. He will accept them and forgive them if they repent, no matter what things they have done. We should desire like God does that all Muslims and all terrorists be saved. We should show them love as Jesus would.
  9. It should not bring us joy when anyone dies. We know that in the end God will bring justice to everyone. We don’t need to try and bring justice ourselves by fighting against terrorists. The Bible teaches that our enemy is not a person. Our enemy is Satan.
  10. One last thing about the war on terror. Terror means fear. Terrorists work to cause fear. We are told over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over in the Bible to not be afraid. We are not to fear anything. Here is a little song my family sings about not being afraid. It’s based on Hebrews 13: 5-6. (You have to click on play flash full screen. Click on the speaker if you want to hear me sing.) We sing it over and over inserting different things into the blank, like terrorists. My kids like to call out “nothing” in response to the question in the song. There is no reason to fear. Trust God that He is in control. Love Him. Obey Him. And you can live in peace even if the world is at war.
M
  1. When you read about President Bush (the younger), you read about 9/11, when terrorists attacked the World Trade Towers in New York City. The US then started the “War on Terror.” The US along with England and other allies decided to fight against terrorists. Soldiers were sent to Afghanistan and then to Iraq. The main target was members of a Muslim group called the Taliban. The members of the Taliban are considered to be terrorists by the United States.
  2. With terrorism, instead of two armies fighting each other, one individual tries to kill or cause damage by surprise. Often “regular” people are killed, not soldiers.
  3. The War on Terror is similar to the Cold War because the “enemy” is just a lumped-together group that is hard to identify and because it causes a fear in people of what might happen. It is different than the Cold War because there is actual fighting instead of just the treat of fighting.
  4. Read these letters by Japanese-American students, page 13. They were written the day after Pearl Harbor was bombed. They were about to face a lot of prejudice because of their names and skin. How did they feel about Pearl Harbor?
  5. What is tolerance? How does the one student define it? (answer:  As we know tolerance means to be friendly to other in any way.)
  6. We just read in our Bible reading about not putting up with false teaching. This is different from tolerance. We should not  tolerate, or put up with false teachings or evil practices in the Church, but we are still to be kind and loving. Loving a defiant sinner in the Church means kicking them out of the church so that they will repent! That’s love.
  7. The “War on Terror” has made some people intolerant of Muslims. Because many (not all) terrorists attack have been done by Muslims, they decide all Muslims are bad and turn their fear and hate toward Muslims. Most Muslims will tell you they think the terrorists are doing evil things.
  8. Even the true terrorists are God’s creations. Jesus died for them. God is able to save them. He will accept them and forgive them if they repent, no matter what things they have done. We should desire, like God does that, all Muslims and all terrorists be saved. We should show them love as Jesus would.
  9. It should not bring us joy when anyone dies. We know that in the end God will bring justice to everyone. We don’t need to try and bring justice ourselves by fighting against terrorists. The Bible teaches that our enemy is not a person. Our enemy is Satan.
  10. One last thing about the war on terror. Terror means fear. Terrorists work to cause fear. We are told over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over in the Bible to not be afraid. There is no reason to fear. Trust God that He is in control. Love Him. Obey Him. And you can live in peace even if the world is at war.
  11. Read the next page of letters (page 14). America reacted in fear toward these students. They were locked up during the war. Was there anything to fear? Never let fear control your actions. Submit to God and let the Holy Spirit control your actions.
  12. Fill out your timeline piece on the War on Terror.
Day 161
L
  1. Read about Barack Obama.
  2. View his timeline.
  3. Fill in his timeline piece. How did he make history?
  4. You can watch this short video about him getting started in politics. (Ask a parent to turn it on for you. There is an ad first. Your parent can watch the ad and pause it after the ad for you.)
M
  1. Read about Barak Obama.
  2. Fill in his timeline piece. How did he make history?
  3. Maybe you would be interested in watching this mini biographical film on his life. (5 minutes)
Day 162
  1. Read the News  (alternate news site). Choose an article and tell someone the who, what, where, when, why and how of it.
M
  1. Play the Orange Revolution game based on the events in Ukraine in 2004.
  2. See if you can do this matching game again.
Day 163
  1. Your job for today and tomorrow is to create a game. You can work together with siblings to make one game if you like.
  2. If you need ideas for how to get started, you can look at this. It also has boards you could print out and dice and spinners you could print out. Or, you can just  make a game up all of your own.
  3. Design your game today and start working on questions. They should have to do with anything from Year 4 History.
Day 164
  1. Keep working on making up questions. Make sure they are from your Year 4 history studies.
Day 165
  1. Play your game with others in your home.
  2. If you aren’t done, keep working on it and play when you are done.
Day 166
  1. You are going to do an end-of-the-year project. You can use the same topic for history and science and can use it for English as well. The first step is to choose a topic. I recommend the Panama Canal. You can study its history and build a model of it. You can choose something else. You could choose Marie Curie and her discovery of uranium, you could research the Manhattan Project or Albert Einstein and his discoveries. Or you could study the history behind any of the elements, or any of the scientific breakthroughs from the past 150 years. Read around a bit today and choose a topic.
  2. The second step is to decide what type of project are you going to do. You can make a lapbook, a poster, a power point presentation, a glog, or a scrapbook either on paper or online. You could write and put on a play or give a speech. Or, you can think of something I haven’t thought of. Choose what you are going to do.
  3. You are going to complete your project, write a bibliography-a list of your resources, and present your project to an audience.
Day 167*
  1. The first step is research. Here are some Research Note Taker sheets. You need to learn everything you can about your topic. Make sure you write down where your information is coming from. You need titles, authors, dates and website addresses.
Day 168
  1. Continue your research.
Day 169
  1. Continue your research.
Day 170
  1. Start your project.
Day 171
  1. Read chapter 1 of A Lifetime of Memories.
  2. What is the setting of the book?   (answer: George’s 100th birthday party and his whole family is with him at his home in NY.)
  3. Tell someone what three scenes take place in the chapter.
  4. Add to your project.
Day 172
  1. Read chapter 2 of A Lifetime of Memories.
  2. Tell someone what three scenes take place in the chapter.
  3. Add to your project.
Day 173
  1. Read chapter 3 of A Lifetime of Memories.
  2. Tell someone what three scenes take place in the chapter.
  3. Add to your project.
Day 174
  1. Read chapter 4 of A Lifetime of Memories.
  2. Tell someone what three scenes take place in the chapter.
  3. Add to your project.
Day 175
  1. Read chapter 5 of A Lifetime of Memories.
  2. Tell someone what three scenes take place in the chapter.
  3. Add to your project.
Day 176
  1. Read chapter 6 of A Lifetime of Memories.
  2. Tell someone what three scenes take place in the chapter.
  3. Add to your project. You need to finish today or tomorrow.
Day 177
  1. Read chapter 7 of A Lifetime of Memories.
  2. Tell someone what three scenes take place in the chapter.
  3. The book mentions the 1965 World’s Fair. Here’s a scrapbook from the 1962 one.
  4. Finish your project. Practice presenting your project. Write what you are going to say if that helps. You are going to tell them about your topic and about your project. Don’t read what you wrote on your project. They can read it for themselves. Tell them about what you learned and about what they will see on your project.
Day 178
  1. Read chapter 8 of A Lifetime of Memories.
  2. Tell someone what three scenes take place in the chapter.
  3. Read over this grading sheet for presenting a topic. You would want to score a 4 for every category. The last one is only if you are working together with siblings. Practice what you are going to say for your presenting.
Day 179
  1. Read chapter 9 of A Lifetime of Memories.
  2. Write a bibliography to go with your project. If your project is online, add your bibliography to your online project.
Day 180
  1. Present your project. Show it to your audience. Tell about your topic without reading exactly what your project says. Let them look at it and ask questions. Answer their questions in complete sentences.
  2. Send me photos, links, videos…and I will post them on this site!

Written by Easy Peasy All-in-One Homeschool

June 18, 2011 at 5:43 am

One Response

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  1. We found this video on Women’s Suffrage: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYu9Zyv1T1Q
    thought we’d share it with you.

    Cyndi

    February 4, 2013 at 2:17 pm


Comments are closed.

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