Language Arts 4

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This course contains only the language arts (writing, spelling, grammar) lessons from English 4/Level 4.

Course Description: Students will improve their writing skills by regularly producing both creative fiction and researched non-fiction. They will learn to form a variety of sentence structures, as well as paragraphs with proper introductions and conclusions. They will also learn the structure of an essay. Writing assignments include: short stories, poems, book reports, autobiographical story, how-to, dialogue, humor, comic strip, letters, descriptive pieces, biographical essay and research report. Students also will develop in their speaking, spelling and grammar skills through their writing assignments as well as through the use of online resources.

LA4Printables

Go offline: learn more about our new language arts course books

Print the worksheets / Buy as a workbook

If you want a place for your child to do writing (about 80 assignments), then consider just getting the full workbook.

Answer Key (The answers are also included with each worksheet in the links on the individual assignments.)

Day 1

Speaking

  1. Recite a poem. It can be from your reading today or you can choose from this page of poems (scroll down for all of them).
    • Choose a poem. Read it out loud to yourself for practice. Then read it to an audience. Speak loudly and clearly.

Day 2

Grammar

  1. Watch the syllable video.
  2. Play a syllable game.

Day 3

Spelling

  1. Play hangman.

Day 4

Writing

  1. Write a list of ten pairs of rhyming words, five of which have to be at least two syllables long. If you need help getting started, here are a few words for which you could find rhymes: darker, rounded, lighten.

Day 5

Writing

  1. You are going to write a poem in the form: ABAB. That means that the stanza (or section of the poem) will have four lines. The “A” lines rhyme and the “B” lines rhyme. ABAB means that the first line rhymes with the third line, and the second line rhymes with the fourth line.
  2. Also, each line should have 7 or 8 syllables. Do you remember what syllables are?
  3. Write a short poem in this form. You only have to write four lines unless you want to write more. The last word of the first line should rhyme with the last word in the third line. The last word in the second line should rhyme with the last word in the fourth line. Each line should be about the same length. You could use some of the rhyming words you thought of on Day 4 to help you get started.
  4. If you like, here’s an example of a poem in this format (in the box on the bottom right).

Day 6

Spelling

  1. Try the spelling bee.

Day 7

Writing

  1. Write a limerick. Limericks are fun poems. This type of poem is in the form: AABBA. The B lines are shorter than the A lines. Here are some examples if you aren’t familiar with them.

Day 8

Spelling

  1. Play word builder.

Day 9

Grammar

  1. Play at Grammaropolis.  Click on the arrow to turn the page and to read about nouns.
  2. Write “Noun” at the top of a page in your notebook. Also write today’s date in the top, right corner.
  3. Remember, a noun is a person, place or thing.
  4. Now on that page write 10 nouns. Include a common noun, a proper noun, a concrete noun, an abstract noun, a compound noun, and a collective noun.

Day 10

Writing

  1. Write another limerick.
  2. A limerick is in the form: AABBA. In this type of poem the B lines not only rhyme but they are shorter in length than the other lines.
  3. How many lines are in this form of poems?  (answer: 5)
  4. Which lines rhyme in a limerick? (answer: The first, second and last lines rhyme. The third and fourth lines rhyme.)
  5. Write in your notebook or on the computer. Please remember to write your name and date at the top of your page.

Day 11*

Spelling*

  1. *Print page 1 and put the words in alphabetical order. Compare the first letter of each word and the letter that comes first in the alphabet, gets listed first in alphabetical order, write it on the first line. If the first letter is the same, then you look at the second letter of the words and compare those. If the second letter is the same, then you compare the third letter of each word until you have all the blanks filled in. You can check your answers on page 2.

Day 12

Writing

  1. Write another limerick.
  2. A limerick is in the form: AABBA. In this type of poem the B lines not only rhyme but they are shorter in length than the other lines.
  3. How many lines are in this form of poems?  (answer: 5)
  4. Which lines rhyme in a limerick? (answer: The first, second and last lines rhyme. The third and fourth lines rhyme.)
  5. Write in your notebook or on the computer. Please remember to write your name and date at the top of your page.

Day 13

Grammar

  1. Identify common and proper nouns. Common nouns are “regular” nouns like building. Proper nouns are names like The White House.

Day 14

Grammar

  1. Play at Grammaropolis.  Click on the arrow to move forward.
  2. Write “Action Verbs” at the top of a new page in your English notebook. Also write the date.
  3. Remember, an action verb tells us what something is doing.
  4. Now on that page write 10 verbs that are happening in your house right now. (Hint: thinking is probably one of them)

Day 15

Write

  1. What form, or rhyme scheme, is the poem found in lesson 43?  (Answer)
  2. How many syllables are in each line?  (Answer)
  3. Write a poem with two stanzas following the same format.

Day 16

Spelling

  1. Try the spelling bee.

Day 17

Writing

  1. Write a poem in any form you like. (It doesn’t even have to rhyme if you don’t want it to.) Have you been learning new vocabulary? If so, try to use at least one new word you’ve recently learned.

Day 18

Spelling

  1. Try and unscramble the words.

Day 19

Grammar

  1. Write linking verbs at the top of a page in your notebook. You can write in there “am, is, are, was, were, will, be, has been, had been, have been, become, became.” You can memorize this list by singing it to any tune. Try “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star” if you can’t think of your own tune.
  2. Here’s a little online verb game. Which sentences contain linking verbs? Which sentences contain action verbs?  (After you click play choose the exercise “Identifying linking and action verbs”.)

Day 20

Writing

  1. Write a poem of any kind. If you need an idea, you could try using a repeating line. I’ll give you an example. You don’t have to do it this way; I’m just wanting to give some inspiration to those who feel stuck about how to start. This isn’t inspirational, but it’s a poem.

It’s morning now time to start the day.

It’s morning now I think I will go play.

Day 21

Spelling

  1. Complete this spelling lesson. You’ll do more with these words later.

Day 22

Writing

  1. Write about your first day stranded on an island.

Day 23

Spelling

  1. Play hangabot with your spelling words.

Day 24

Grammar

  1. Write 10 nouns in your notebook: five common and five proper. Make sure you list people, places and things. Also, write 5 action verbs and 5 linking verbs from your reading.

Day 25

Writing

  1. Write a how-to survival guide. Pick one survival skill: building a shelter, cooking dandelions, making a fire, anything you can think of that might be helpful. Write a how-to. Write an introduction sentence telling us what you are going to teach us. Then write. in numbered steps. what you need to do. Write every little step. (example: 1. Look for dandelions that are already flowering.) Write as many steps as you can.

Day 26

Grammar

  1. Read this page about the different sentence types.
  2. Write an imperative sentence.

Day 27

Writing

  1. Write two declarative sentences, two interrogatory sentences, two exclamatory sentences and two imperative sentences.
  2. If you can make these into a story, get a high five and/or hug.

Day 28

Writing

  1. Write two declarative sentences, two interrogatory sentences, two exclamatory sentences and two imperative sentences. These should be new sentences!
  2. If you can make these into a story, get a high five and/or hug.

Day 29*

Grammar

  1. *Print out page 1 of this worksheet on common and proper nouns and read and follow the  directions. Important: Check over your work by making sure none of the common nouns have a capital letter and all of the proper nouns do. (When you write, using a proper noun instead of a common noun makes your writing more specific and more interesting.) You can check your answers on page 2.

Day 30

Writing

  1. Write a short story about being alone (on an island, in the woods, wherever) but use at least one of each type of sentence . (Use Day 26 if you need a reminder).

Day 31

Handwriting

  1. Copy a long sentence from your reading today. If you have no reading assignment, choose a book in your house.

Day 32

Grammar

  1. Copy each type of sentence from your reading: declarative, interrogatory, exclamatory and imperative.

Day 33

English

  1. What’s the main idea?

Day 34

English

  1. Find the main idea of each paragraph.

Day 35

Writing

  1. You are stranded on an island. You see some floating on the water headed toward shore. What is it? It can be ANYTHING. Start your story with seeing it. What is it and how does it change life on the island forever?

Day 36

Handwriting

  1. Copy a great sentence from the book–something exciting, interesting, descriptive, funny…

Day 37

Writing

  1. Write a short story. You are on the shore and a bottle washes up with a message inside. What does the message say?
  2. Do your best and give this to a parent for your portfolio.

Day 38

Spelling

  1. Do the word search.

Day 39*

English*

  1. *Print page 1. Read the story and answer the questions. You can check your answers on page 2.

Day 40

Writing

  1. Write a dialogue between you and someone else. Just write dialogue, you talking back and forth with the other person. You could make it interesting and make the other person a character from a book you are reading. Put quotation marks around anything that is being said. “I’m talking to you,” I said.
  2. We’ll be practicing more with dialogue punctuation. You can look at my example for now and use what you remember to write as best you can.
  3. One rule to remember is that whenever someone different starts speaking, you need to start writing on a new line.

Day 41

Handwriting

  1. Copy the best sentence–funniest, most interesting, most descriptive, most exciting…

Day 42

Writing

  1. Pretend you are on a stranded island and someone has found you. Write a dialogue between you and the person. Would you consider staying? What would you ask about? for?

Day 43

Spelling

  1. Be in the spelling bee.
  2. You could take a screen shot of this for your portfolio.

Day 44

Grammar

  1. Here’s where you put your punctuation when you write a dialogue. The quotation marks go around what is being said. “I’m telling you to come here.” NOTICE! The quotation marks go around the period, comma, exclamation point or question mark. That other punctuation mark goes inside the quotation because it’s part of how the person is saying it. Punctuation always comes before the quotation marks.
  2. Here’s the tricky part. “Come here,” I said. Even though “come here” is a sentence, I didn’t put a period there. I used a comma. If you were to tell someone about this, you would say, “She said come here.” You would say it all as one sentence, right? The “I said” part is part of the sentence; it tells us about what’s being said.
  3. Review examples:
    • Let’s have dinner this weekend.”   (End punctuation inside quotation marks)
    • Let’s have dinner this weekend,” he said to her.   (Comma instead of period and inside quotation marks, lowercase “he”)
    • He said, “Let’s have dinner.”   (Comma after said — not inside quotation marks, uppercase “Let’s”)
  4. You can do it! Take the dialogue punctuation quiz.

Day 45

Writing

  1. Write a comic strip.

Day 46

Writing

  1. Choose someone you are learning about in history to write a biography about. Write down five facts about that person.

Day 47

Writing

  1. Find at least five more facts about the person you are going to write a biography about.
  2. Your facts should be in a neat list. Hold onto this!

Day 48

Writing

  1. Organize your facts for your biography into these categories: who, what, where, when, why/how. Here’s how to do it.
  2. Get out your fact list from day 47. Next to all of the who/what facts, write 1. Next to all of your where/when facts, write 2. Next to all of your why/how facts, write 3.
  3. If you don’t have three facts for each category, try to find more to make sure you have at least three, for each category. Hold onto your list.

Day 49

Grammar

  1. Play this dialogue punctuation game. Click on really hard.
  2. Look over the dialogue you wrote the other day and your punctuation rules from last week. Do you need to make any corrections?

Day 50

Writing

  1. Write a story/dialogue online.

Day 51*

Writing*

  1. *Print out this hamburger and fill it in using all of your facts labeled 1, all of your  “who/what” facts. Your hamburger is your paragraph. All of your details or facts will tell about your main idea. Your closing sentence should answer the question, “so what?” Why did you just tell them all those facts? Here’s an example.
  2. main idea: George Washington was a leader in many ways.
  3. detail #1:  He was general of the troops in America during the American Revolution.
  4. detail #2:  He led congress’ delegates in forming the Constitution.
  5. detail #3:  He became the first president to serve America under the Constitution.
  6. closing sentence:  He was successful no matter what hat he was wearing.

Day 52

Writing

  1. Use a book you are reading for school and copy three sentences that use a transition. A transition is a word or words that take the reader from one thought to another smoothly. Here are some examples of what to look for: Finally…The next day…Next…The following morning….

Day 53*

Writing*

  1. *Fill in the where/when hamburger with all of your facts labeled 2.
  2. Remember that all of your details (facts) need to be about your main idea. Your closing statement should answer the question, “so what?”
  3. Example with the main idea and closing statement in bold:

Whenever and wherever his country ask him to be, that’s where Washington could be found. He was born in Mount Vernon, Virginia. He returned there to live after serving as general during the Revolution from 1775 until 1781. He wanted to retire then and there, but he moved to Philadelphia to live when he was unanimously voted president of the United States. He was a true example of what a politician is meant to be, a servant of the people.

Day 54*

Grammar*

  1. *Print out this page.  Cut into pieces.
  2. Arrange into different dialogues.
  3. Go to Day 44 to review the rules of dialogue punctuation and capitalization.

Day 55*

Writing*

  1. *Fill in the why/how hamburger using your facts labeled 3.
  2. Remember that all of your details (facts) need to be about your main idea. Your closing statement should answer the question, “so what?”
  3. Example with the main idea and closing statement in bold:

Washington was a natural leader because he was a man people respected and trusted. There is a famous story about Washington cutting down his father’s cherry tree. When questioned, Washington confesses saying, “I cannot tell a lie.” While this story may be make believe, it shows what people believed about Washington. People, including his troops and members of congress, found him completely trustworthy, making it easy to respect him. This ability to win people’s trust and respect made him a great leader. 

Day 56

Writing

  1. Read about writing an opening sentence.
  2. You are going to write an introduction about your biography. This paragraph can be shorter than the other you have written. It needs to be at least three sentences long.
  3. This time instead of the first sentence being your main idea, the last sentence is going to be your main idea. It will tell the main idea of your biography. It should be as specific as is possible.
  4. Your first sentence should be interesting. It should make people want to read your biography. An easy way to get people interested is by asking them a question.
  5. Here’s an example.
    • opening sentence: Ever wonder what makes someone great?
    • middle (no details yet):  History has many greats. One man in particular was a great leader at an important time in America’s history.
    • main idea of the whole biography (called the thesis): George Washington was a great leader when America needed one.

Day 57

Writing

  1. Write an account of your day yesterday. Include a sound word in every sentence.  creak, crash, burp, slurp, tweet, trickle, bump, shuffle, buzz…

Day 58

Writing

  1. Write a conclusion paragraph for your biography.
  2. This time the first sentence should tell your main idea again.
  3. Like your introduction, there should be at least three sentences.
  4. The last sentence should include the word “I.” Tell what you think or feel about the person. Answer the “so what” question. Tell why you wrote the essay.
  5. Here is my example.
    • main idea (in different words, not the same exact sentence): George Washington was a great leader when America was struggling to be independent and to stand on its own.
    • middle (no new details): He united his troops as general and the country as president by commanding their respect.
    • closing sentence: I think God put George Washington in the right place at the right time, just who America needed in order to become the United States of America.

Day 59

Grammar

  1. Play this noun game.
  2. Play this verb game.
  3. Play this idioms game.

Day 60

Writing

  1. Write a letter to your mother, but write as someone from the time period you are studying. If you have to write your letter in hieroglyphics, so be it. 🙂

Day 61

Writing

  1. Take your five paragraphs and put them together over the next few days. This is called a five-paragraph essay.
  2. Read this page about paragraphs in non-fiction writing. (Remember that non-fiction is about real things as opposed to fiction which is made up stories.)
  3. Today type or write out your introduction and who/what paragraphs.
  4. Read it out loud. Make a note of spots you stumble over or that sound weird. Go back and change those spots.

Day 62

Writing

  1. Copy your when/where and why/how paragraphs today. They each should start with a transition.
  2. Make sure all of your paragraphs flow together into one essay. Try to make connections. Look at the list of connecting words and use some of them to help connect the paragraphs to each other.
    • You can also say things like, “While he was a great leader during times of war, he was also a great leader in times of peace.
  3. Read your biography out loud, the whole thing so far. Did it sound smoother? Fix any spots that just don’t sound right.
Day 63
Writing
  1. Copy your conclusion today.
  2. Check your biography to make sure that there are long sentences and short sentences. There should be sentences with “and” or “but,” sentences with “because.” Try and include a sentence with an exclamation point and a question mark as well.
  3. The more varied the sentences are that you include, the more interesting your biography will be. That means your writing will be more interesting to read if you use lots of different types of sentences.
  4. Read the whole thing out loud and change anything that makes you stumble.

Day 64

Writing

  1. Check for capital letters, commas, and any other problems.
  2. Choose one verb and look it up in the thesaurus and choose a different word instead.
  3. Put a title on your biography. Print it out!
    • You might want to save this.
    • You might want to read it an audience as well.

Day 65  

Writing

  1. Write a descriptive paragraph of a scene from a book you have been reading. Read more directions below.
  2. Describe what you would see if you were there, what you would hear, what you would smell!
  3. Try to include at least one sentence each with a period, a question mark, an exclamation point and use at least one comma. If you do all of those things get a high five and/or hug.

Day 66

Writing

  1. Read your description paragraph out loud. Fix any problems you hear.
  2. Write an opening sentence that makes the reader be interested in reading about the description. (eg. Have you ever been to a deserted island?)
  3. Write a concluding sentence that contains a thought or feeling. (eg. I think there would be no more beautiful place on earth than an island never touched by people.)

Day 67

Writing

  1. Read your descriptive paragraph our loud. Fix any problems you see or hear.
  2. Print it out. You could save this for your portfolio.
  3. Write a summary of a book you have recently read. In one paragraph tell the main characters, where they were and what they did. You have to do this in three to five sentences.

Day 68

Writing

  1. Write a paragraph telling about the best thing about the book. (The one you wrote a summary for on Day 67.)
  2. Describe the best thing and then tell why you think it is the best thing. Write three to five sentences.

Day 69

Writing

  1. Write a paragraph telling about the worst thing about the book. (The one you wrote a summary for on Day 67.)
  2. Describe the worst thing and then tell why you think it is the worst thing. Write three to five sentences.

Day 70

Writing

  1. Over the last few assignments you have been writing the three middle paragraphs of a book report essay.
  2. Today write the introduction.
  3. In your introduction write the author’s name, the title of the book (underline it or type it in italics), and describe it. How long is it? What words would you use to describe it? (fun, adventurous, family, sad, exciting)
  4. Write three to five sentences

Day 71

Writing

  1. Today write the conclusion to your book report essay.
  2. In your conclusion, tell what you think of the book. Would you recommend others read it? Would you read other books like it? Your last sentence should be a thought or feeling, “I think…”.
  3. Write three to five sentences.

Day 72

Writing

  1. Read your book report essay out loud. Mark any problems.
  2. Fix any problems you see or hear.
  3. Rewrite your first sentence, or add a new sentence. Make it interesting. Make people want to read your book report. Maybe you want to use a question. (Example: Have you ever thought about what it would be like to be stranded on an island?)
  4. Do you need to rewrite the first sentence of each middle paragraph to use transitions and connecting words. Don’t just jump around.
  5. Note when you have three short sentences next to each other. Can you combine two with “and” and make a longer sentence. Can you combine two thoughts and use “because” or “if.” Make sure you use long and short sentences.
  6. Change one of your verbs to make it more interesting.
  7. Add a description of someone or something.

Day 73

Writing

  1. Read your book report out loud. Fix any problems.
  2. Print it out and share with others.
  3. You might want to save this in your portfolio.

Grammar

  1. Watch the video on adjectives.
  2. Fix up the late football review.

Day 74*

Grammar*

  1. *Print page 1 and complete the worksheet on adjectives. You can check your answers on page 2.

Day 75

Writing

  1. Write a letter to the president.
  2. Use a formal letter writing format.
  3. In the top corner goes your address, then beneath it the date, then beneath that the name and address of who is getting your letter…
  4. Look at this example letter for how to layout your letter.
  5. Then write it! (and send it)

Speaking

  1. Read your letter to an audience.

Day 76

Grammar

  1. Play this identify the adjective game.

Day 77

Writing

  1. Write a fun story.

Day 78

Writing

  1. Add LOTS of adjectives to your story.
  2. Make sure you don’t have three of the same type of sentence next to each other. Use , and , but , or, if, when, because…?…!

Day 79*

Grammar*

  1. *Print out page one and find the adjectives. Then check your answers on page 2. How did you do?
  2. You could save this in your portfolio.

Writing

  1. Read your story out loud.
  2. Fix any problems.

Day 80*

Speaking

  1. *Print out your story. (You can add this to your portfolio.)
  2. Read it to an audience. Read it loudly and clearly. Use expression.
  3. Make them laugh!

Day 81*

Writing*

  1. *Print out this worksheet. In the box draw your main character for your new funny story. Write a bit about him underneath. Make sure you give your character a name and age.

Day 82*

Writing*

  1. *Print out this worksheet. Draw or write the beginning of your funny story. Where is your character at the beginning of the story? What’s going on?

Day 83*

Writing*

  1. *Print out this worksheet to draw/write what will happen in the story (the middle and the end).

Day 84

Grammar

  1. Play this parts of speech game. Click on adverb and preposition to take them off the game. Choose your speed.

Day 85

Writing

  1. Work on writing your funny story. You can finish on Day 86.

Day 86

Writing

  1. Finish writing your funny story.

Day 87

Writing

  1. Read your story aloud and fix any parts that don’t sound right. Do any words not look right? Fix their spelling. Do any sentences go on and on and on? Add a comma and a conjunction.

Speaking

  1. Read your story to someone and see if they laugh.

Day 88

Spelling

  1. Be in the spelling bee.

Day 89

Grammar

  1. Copy this sentence:

And as the three children went home up the hill, Peter hugging the engine, now quite its own self again, Bobbie told, with joyous leaps of the heart, the story of how she had been an Engine-burglar.

  1. Underline all the adjectives. Circle the verbs. Draw a line over all the nouns. (Answers)

Day 90

Writing

  1. Write a short story about a stranger who showed up in your town. Who is he (or she) and how did he end up there?

Day 91

Writing

  1. “She had never been a real heroine before, and the feeling was delicious.” (From The Railway Children)  Write about something that would make you feel “delicious.”

Day 92

Writing

  1. Describe one of your siblings or one of your parents. Not just what he or she looks like. What is he or she like, how does he or she act? What makes he or she different, special?
  2. Think about all the ways the characters are described in a book you are reading for school.

Day 93

Spelling

  1. Match the words to their definitions. These are homophones, words that sound alike but are spelled differently.

Day 94

Writing

  1. Copy this sentence…”Well, then,” said Bobbie, fumbling miserably, yet not without hope, in her tightly stuffed pocket. (I cut off the end of it.)
  2. Look at the description in the sentence you copied. You can see what she did, how she did it, how she felt about it and what it looked like.
  3. Write a sentence that gives a picture of what someone did and how he did it and how he felt and looked.

Day 95

Writing

  1. Write a short story using at least two homophones, but try to use as many as possible. If you use more than two, get a high five and/or hug.

Day 96

Spelling

  1. Play this spelling game.

Day 97

Spelling

  1. Be in the spelling bee.

Day 98

Grammar

  1. Play this noun game.  A proper noun is capitalized; it is something’s name. A common noun is lowercase.

Day 99

English

  1. Do you know what these idioms mean?

Day 100

Spelling

  1. Can you fill in the clueless crossword?

Day 101

Writing

  1. Copy this sentence: ONCE on a dark winter’s day, when the yellow fog hung so thick and heavy in the streets of London that the lamps were lighted and the shop windows blazed with gas as they do at night, an odd-looking little girl sat in a cab with her father and was driven rather slowly through the big thoroughfares.
  2. Draw a box around all the nouns. Underline all the adjectives. Circle the verbs. (Answers)
  3. This is a good sentence because it tells what is happening, describes it and makes you feel it. What types of feeling does this sentence produce? (Answers)
  4. The adverbs in this sentence are “rather slowly” which describe the verb, “was driven” telling us how the cab was driven; it was driven rather slowly.
  5. Adverbs describe verbs mainly but can also describe adjectives and other adverbs.
    • If you quickly go somewhere, quickly is telling how you went. Quickly is the adverb.
    • We often go on walks. Often tells how you go. Often is the adverb.
    • It’s really dark. Really tells about how dark it is.
    • In the example in the sentence on their page, the adverbs are rather slowly. Slowly tells how the car is going and rather describes how slowly it is going.
    • They are all adverbs.
      • Often, but not always, adverbs end in the letters LY.
      • Adverbs tell us how.
    • In the example slowly describes how the car is driving and rather describes how slowly.

Day 102

Writing

  1. Read this sentence: WHEN Sara entered the school-room the next morning everybody looked at her with wide, interested eyes.
  2. List the nouns, adjectives and verbs (separately). (Answers)
  3. What does this sentence show us about what the girls in the room were feeling/thinking?
  4. Write a sentence that shows (not tells) us that the people in the room are scared.
  5. Write a sentence that show (not tells) us that the people in the room are happy.

Day 103

Writing

  1. Read this sentence: ON that first morning, when Sara sat at Miss Minchin’s side, aware that the whole school-room was devoting itself to observing her, she had noticed very soon one little girl, about her own age, who looked at her very hard with a pair of light, rather dull, blue eyes.
  2. List the nouns, pronouns, adjectives and verbs. Pronouns are the words that replace nouns, eg. He takes the place of Bob. (Answers)
  3. Write a “when” sentence. Example: When I entered the room, I was surprised by what I saw.
  4. Now add a description to the end of your “when clause”. Look at the example of the first sentence in the chapter. The sentence could jump from “side” to “she”. Go and read it that way. But she adds in something. Here’s my example: When I entered the room, the one our family spends most its time in, I was surprised by what I saw. Now add in your extra.
  5. Now add a clause, section, to the end of your sentence. The author doesn’t stop at how she noticed a little girl. She describes the girl. Add to the end of your sentence. Don’t forget to section off your clauses with commas. Here’s my example.  When I entered the room, the one our family spends most its time in, I was surprised by what I saw, something I will never forget. Now you write your new and improved sentence.
  6. Get a high five and/or hug if you can find an adverb in the sentence from the book. There are three and they all describe adjectives.

Day 104

Writing

  1. Write a long sentence with at least six adjectives and at least two verbs. Start out “When……,” Don’t forget the comma! (Example: When the five squirmy children finally rustle out from under their warm and wrinkled covers, they immediately rush for the kitchen with one important question on their eager lips, “What’s for breakfast?”)
  2. Get a high five and/or hug if you include an adverb.
  3. Don’t forget to section off your clauses with commas.

Day 105

  1. Read this sentence: OF COURSE the greatest power Sara possessed and the one which gained her even more followers than her luxuries and the fact that she was “the show pupil,” the power that Lavinia and certain other girls were most envious of, and at the same time most fascinated by in spite of themselves, was her power of telling stories and of making everything she talked about seem like a story, whether it was one or not.
  2. Let’s write one in a similar fashion.
  3. Start out with, “The thing” I’m most proud of, or that makes me happiest, or I’m most scared of…
    •  Example:The thing I’m most proud of is my ability to stay calm in an emergency. (I’m joking.)
  4. Now look at the sentence again. The thing that makes Sara the most popular is her story telling. But it doesn’t just say that. What comes in between?
  5. Now add an “in between” in your sentence. Use commas to section off your in between clause.
    • Example:The thing I’m most proud of, besides my charm and unfading beauty, is my ability to stay calm in an emergency. Now you do it.
  6. Write a short, fun story, a wonderfully inventive story like Sara would tell. Try to use LONG sentences.

Day 106

Grammar

  1. Read about adjectives.
  2. Remember, an adjective describes a noun.
  3. Try the game.

Writing

  1. Now write a short story about yourself. Use at least 5 adjectives that describe you.

Day 107

Grammar

  1. Read about adverbs.
  2. Write “Adverbs” at the top of a page in your notebook.
  3. Remember, an adverb describes the action, tells us how something is done. Examples: quickly, often
  4. Now on that page write 5 adverbs describing how you can do your school work (eg. accurately, crazily…).
  5. Now write 5 adverbs describing how you could treat your family members (eg. respectfully, rudely…).
  6. Adverbs can also describe adjectives or other adverbs. It’s very hard or rather boring.

Spelling

  1. Play this spelling game.

Day 108*

Grammar

  1. Adverbs describe how something is done. How did you walk? Quickly. How did you cook? Skillfully. How did you eat? Sloppily.
  2. The easiest adverbs to recognize are adverbs that end in ly, like all of my examples.
  3. What two -ly adverbs are in the first paragraph? They come right before the verbs they are describing. (Answers)

Writing*

  1. *You are going to start filling out an autobiographical notebook. Today you are going to fill in the pages about yourself and your parents. Do a good job. Give as much detail as you can. Describe them well.

Day 109*

Grammar*

  1. Watch this adverb video.
  2. *Print out page 1 of this good vs. well worksheet. Complete worksheet. Check your answers on page 2. Well is an adverb. Good is an adjective. What is the word describing? If it is describing a noun, then use the adjective, good. If it describes a verb, then use the adverb, well.

Day 110

Writing

  1. Write a pretend day from your life. You are the star character. It takes place in your home or at a place you are at regularly, but it never happened.

Day 111

Writing*

  1. Look at this sentence:  There was, however, one place from which one could see all the splendor of them: the piles of red or gold clouds in the west; or the purple ones edged with dazzling brightness; or the little fleecy, floating ones, tinged with rose-color and looking like flights of pink doves scurrying across the blue in a great hurry if there was a wind.
  2. Write a sentence with “however” in the middle. Put a comma before it and after it.
  3. Note: before the “however” is a complete sentence; it has a subject and a verb. After the “however” is not, it does not have a verb.
  4. Example of a sentence like the one in the book: I got some of my work done, however, just my schoolwork and not my chores.
  5. Try to write one like her sentence where the words after the “however” could not be their own sentence (otherwise you’d need a period before “however.”)
  6. *Work on your autobiography. Today you are going to fill out the pages on your siblings (print out the correct number of brother and sister pages depending on your family makeup).

Grammar

  1. The word only is an adverb. It is describing how she could see. If you used “only” in the sentence you just wrote and it doesn’t describe a noun, underline it and write adverb over or below it.
  2. Read this page on adverbs. All of the bold words are adverbs.
  3. Write one sentence with at least two adverbs in it. If you use more, get a high five and/or hug.

Day 112

Spelling

  1. Take a look at these words.
  2. Play Hang Mouse.

Writing*

  1. Look at this sentence:  WHEN one lives in a row of houses, it is interesting to think of the things which are being done and said on the other side of the wall of the very rooms one is living in.
  2. Let’s write another “when” sentence. Start with “when.” At the end of the clause don’t forget the comma.
  3. Example:  When the sun rises, the light warms my body and soul.
  4. *Work on your autobiography. Today you are going to fill out the pages on your grandparents. Conduct interviews as necessary.

Day 113*

Grammar

  1. Look at this sentence:  There were days on which Sara tramped through snow when she went on her errands; there were worse days when the snow melted and combined itself with mud to form slush; there were others when the fog was so thick that the lamps in the street were lighted all day and London looked as it had looked the afternoon, several years ago, when the cab had driven through the thoroughfares with Sara tucked up on its seat, leaning against her father’s shoulder.
  2. It uses semicolons (;). They are used in place of periods when you don’t want to end the sentence.
  3. This long sentence reads like a list. The author could have used a period before each “there were.” But since all of these sentences were connected, she combined them using semicolons. Find the two ;s in that sentence.
  4. Now write a sentence with a semicolon. You will write two sentences and then use a ; instead of a .
  5. Example: I will write three related sentences like in the book.   I want to go to the park and to the playground; I want to go to the mall and to the food court; I want to do too many things.
  6. Now you do it!

Writing*

  1. *Work on your autobiography. Today you are going to fill out the pages on your great grandparents. Conduct interviews as necessary.
  2. Read this page on writing paragraphs.

Day 114

Writing

  1. Write a short story. Use at least one proper noun, five adjectives, three adverbs, “however,” and a semicolon.
  2. Get a high five and/or hug if you include more than that or if you include a sentence that begins with “when.”
  3. Don’t get bogged down with the rules. Just start writing! Anything! You can go back and throw in any of those things you missed.

Day 115*

Spelling

  1. Take a spelling test.

Writing**

  1. Play this game on writing paragraphs.
  2. **Work on your autobiography. Today you will fill out the “My Beginnings” pages. Interview your parents. Fill in the page of information. Use this page to write the story of when you were born. What happened? How were your parents feeling? Who came to see you?

Day 116

Spelling

  1. Take the spelling test again if you got more than three wrong on Day 115.

Grammar

  1. Find four adverbs in this sentence from your reading. Adverbs answer the question, how.  (Answers)
  • She climbed on a chair, very cautiously raised the skylight, and peeped out. It had been snowing all day, and on the snow, quite near her, crouched a tiny, shivering figure, whose small black face wrinkled itself piteously at sight of her.

Day 117*

Writing**

  1. **Work on your autobiography. Do the “Special Things About Me” pages. On the first page you can list different descriptive words about you like “funny,” or you could write words like “soccer.” Or, you could draw pictures. On the second page write the story of a special event in your life.

Day 118

Spelling

  1. Complete this PuzzleFast word search.

Day 119*

Writing**

  1. **Today you will complete the “My Favorite Things” pages. On the first page list or draw pictures of your favorite things. On the second page write the story of a special memory with one of your favorite things.

Day 120

Grammar

  1. Play word invasion. Uncheck prepositions.

Day 121

Writing

  1. You are going to write a review of a book you have recently read.
  2. Today just answer SOME of the questions on the web page I linked to in number 1.

Day 122

Writing

  1. Today, organize your answers into a paragraph.
  2. Your first and last sentence should tell your overall opinion of the book.
  3. The middle should tell a bit of what the book is about and the good and bad parts of it. Keep it brief.

Day 123*

Writing*

  1. *Continue your autobiography notebook by filling in the page for “Places I’ve Lived.”

Grammar

  1. Play word invasion. Uncheck prepositions.

Day 124*

Writing*

  1. *Write the story of your life on this page.

Day 125

Writing

  1. Finish the story of your life.
  2. Interview someone in your family. You are going to write about this person. You are going to pick a word that describes them. You are going to give three examples of how they fit that description.
  3. Ask them to describe themselves. Ask them for a word that describes them.
  4. Ask for three stories that show why they are that way.
  5. You are going to write a biography essay about this person. Not today! Your only job now is to interview the person.

Day 126

Writing

  1. Write the first middle paragraph of your essay. The body of your essay (the three middle paragraphs) will tell the three story examples. For this paragraph choose one of the story examples.
  2. Remember how to write in a hamburger? The first sentence is your main idea. (Example: One of the ways my grandfather was creative was by painting.) Note: Creative is the word that describes him.
  3. Then you tell about his painting.
  4. Write a final sentence. (One of his paintings is hanging in my room, and I love to look at it.)

Day 127

Writing

  1. Write the second middle paragraph of your essay. The body of your essay (the three middle paragraphs) will tell the three story examples. For this paragraph choose a story.
  2. Remember how to write in a hamburger? The first sentence is your main idea. Use a transition word.(Example: Another way my grandfather was creative was by playing the clarinet.)
  3. Then you tell about his music.
  4. Write a final sentence. (I use his old clarinet and am learning to play it myself.)

Day 128

Writing

  1. Write the third middle paragraph of your essay. The body of your essay (the three middle paragraphs) will tell the three story examples. For this paragraph choose a story.
  2. Remember how to write in a hamburger? The first sentence is your main idea. Use a transition word.(Example: A Final way my grandfather was creative was by inventing.)
  3. Then you tell about his inventions.
  4. Write a final sentence. (I think he was a genius in the things he invented.)

Day 129

Writing

  1. Write the conclusion to your essay. The first sentence should say the main idea of your essay. (Example: My grandfather was a creative genius.)
  2. In your last sentence compare or contrast yourself to the person you wrote about. (Example: My grandfather was creative in so many ways, and although I don’t have the same talents as he did, I like to think I’m creative just like he was.)
  3. Your conclusion should have at least three sentences.

Day 130

Grammar

  1. Answer the questions.

Day 131

Writing

  1. Read about writing an opening sentence.
  2. You are going to write an introduction for your biography essay. This paragraph can be shorter than the others you have written. It needs to be at least three sentences long.
  3. This time instead of the first sentence being your main idea, the last sentence is going to be your main idea.
  4. Your first sentence should be interesting. It should make people want to read your biography. An easy way to get people interested is by asking them a question.
  5. Example: Have you ever known a genius? Genius comes in many forms. There are math geniuses and writer geniuses. My grandfather’s genius was in his creativity.

Day 132

Writing

  1. Read your essay out loud. Fix any problem areas.
  2. Use this page to see if you should change anything on your essay. Change it if it needs it.
  3. Print your essay when you are happy with it.
  4. “Publish” your autobiography. Put all the pages together. Include your family biography essay. Make a cover. Share it with your family. Read your essay aloud to the person you interviewed.

Day 133

Grammar

  1. Can you find the words that need capitalizing?
  2. Learn from your mistakes and then they are valuable to you!

Spelling

  1. Play this spelling game. Click on unit 30.

Day 134

Writing

  1. Read this sample of a story about an event in your life. Read Day of Destiny on page 24.
  2. What makes it a good story? What makes it interesting? How does it begin? How does it end? How does it transition from paragraph to paragraph?
  3. Choose an event in your life to write about.  Start writing. Write the first paragraph. Start with an interesting sentence! Your first paragraph tell a bit about what the story is going to be, like telling the main idea in a non-fiction essay. How does the author of the sample story tell the main idea in the last sentence of the first paragraph?
  4. Turn the page to page 25. In this story the main idea is the first sentence.

Day 135

Writing

  1. Write more of your story. Try to write half a page.

Day 136

Writing

  1. Read this sample again of a story about an event in your life. Read Day of Destiny on page 24. Pay attention to the first and last paragraphs.
  2. What’s the last line of the first and last paragraphs? When you write stories, you need to write in a circle. When we write non-fiction, we finish by restating our main idea. It’s sort of like that in a story as well. You finish where you start. You close the circle. Have you ever read a book or watched a movie that left you with the question, “What happened to…?” People don’t like that. They want to know what happened. They want all the loose ends tied up. Did you ever read a book or watch a movie where at the end it tells you what happened to each character? That’s because they know people want the circle closed, they want the loose ends tied up, they want everything settled and everyone happy 🙂
  3. In the sample story he says he wants to make people laugh. In the end he says he knows he wants to be a comedian. They are saying the same thing. He closed the circle. It makes us happy.
  4. In the beach story on page 25, how does the last paragraph repeat the main idea and close the circle?
  5. Finish writing your story. Close the circle. (Look at your first paragraph.)

Day 137

Writing

  1. Read your story out loud. Mark anywhere it comes out awkward.
  2. Fix the places you marked.
  3. Anywhere you have three short sentences all together, combine two of them into a longer sentence.
  4. Check for spelling, capitalization, spelling…
  5. Ready? Publish.
  6. You should save this in your portfolio.

Day 138

Writing

  1. Write a main idea sentence for the chapter you read today. (If you didn’t read a chapter today, you’ll have to use something else, maybe a children’s book you know well or other story.)

Day 139*

Grammar*

  1. *Print page 1 of this adverb worksheet and follow the directions.
  2. Check your answers on page 2. Fix your mistakes.
  3. Save this for your portfolio.

Day 140

Writing

  1. Write an interesting first sentence for a paragraph on what you read today.
  2. Also write a main idea sentence for the chapter you read.
  3. If you didn’t have a reading assignment today, use something you’ve read recently or a story you know well.

Day 141*

Writing*

  1. The main idea is the point of the paragraph. The details in a paragraph point to the main idea. While paragraphs most often begin with the main idea, there are different types of paragraphs and some end with the main idea. Sometimes the main idea is even in the second sentence.
  2. *Take the quiz. You can check your answers on page 2.

Day 142

Writing

  1. Take this summarizing quiz.

Day 143

Writing

  1. Write a main idea sentence for the chapter you read today. If you didn’t have a reading assignment, use a story you know well.

Day 144

Grammar

  1. Play some verb games.

Day 145

Grammar

  1. Practice spelling and grammar with this verb game.
  2. Win some fake money.

Day 146

Grammar

  1. Choose the correct verb quiz.

Day 147

Writing

  1. Make a list of ten action verbs.
  2. Now write an adverb next to each one.
  3. Hold onto your list.

Day 148

Writing

  1. Write a story using your verbs and adverbs. Use at least half of them. Go get a hug and/or a high five if you use more.

Day 149

Grammar

  1. to/two/too quiz
  2. who’s/whose and their/there/they’re  quiz
  • who’s is a contraction, a short way of saying who is
  • whose is possessive-that means it shows someone possesses something-whose book is this
  • their is possessive-they possess it, own it-their house
  • there is a location-in that place over there
  • they’re is a contraction, a short way of saying they are

Day 150

Writing

  1. Take your story and try to replace each verb and adverb combo with a more specific verb. Here are some examples:
  • talk quietly=whisper
  • walk quickly=hustle
  • jump vigorously=launch  (He launched himself off the bed.)

Day 151

Grammar

  1. Play word invasion. Unclick prepositions.

Day 152

Spelling

  1. Match the words by choosing words with the same vowel sound. Say them out loud!

Day 153

Grammar

  1. Play noun basketball. Remember that a noun is a person, place or thing. A proper noun is a name of a person, place or thing and is always capitalized.

Day 154

Writing

  1. Write a short story. To get started go back to your reading from today and choose five words in a row. Use those five words all together in the same order in your story.
  2. Read your story to someone when you are done.

Day 155

Spelling
  1. Take this spelling quiz.
Day 156
Grammar
Day 157
Spelling
  1. Find the homonyms, words that sound the same.
Day 158
Writing
  1. Write a short story using at least two sets of homonyms. Here are some more homonyms if you need more ideas.
  2. Get a high five and a hug if you use three or more sets of homonyms.
Day 159
Writing
  1. Just for a reminder…write a letter. The body of the letter can just be one sentence. The point is to remind yourself about how it should look.
Day 160
Writing
  1. Write an acrostic poem.
Day 161
Writing
  1. Describe a scene, a picture. Use this for your first sentence. “The wind blew cold and dry.” What kind of setting do you imagine with that description? Just picture it and describe it. It’s not a story. Nothing needs to happen. Just describe the picture you are imagining. What is there? What do you see, hear, smell, feel? Write at least five sentences.
  2. Just for fun (because writing is fun), I wrote an example.
The wind blew cold and dry. Leaves tumbled across the parking lot, scraping the pavement with their crisp, dry edges. One lonely car, accompanied only by a trash dumpster, sat in the corner of the empty lot. It huddled under the balding tree. The sky was clear blue like an untouched pool of summer, but the cold wind reminded that summer was past. 
Day 162
Writing
  1. Take your description from yesterday. Add a character. Write a paragraph describing a character. It doesn’t have to be a person. Put your character into the scene and describe your character. What does he look like, sound like? What is the character feeling being part of the scene you described yesterday? What is your character’s name? How old is he? What is his favorite thing to do? You don’t have to tell us all of these things. Describe him so that we know all of these things. How can you describe him so that we can learn about him? Write at least five sentences.
  2. Here’s my just-for-fun example.
A dog came traipsing across the lot. He was scruffy and unkempt but had a spring in his step and a smile on his face. He wasn’t starved; he had muscle on his bones. He was a mutt, a mix of this and that and probably, the other as well. He was nondescript — not big, not small, his fur not long, not short. He had spots of black and brown and probably at one time white.
Day 163
Writing
  1. Now write the next paragraph. Have something totally unexpected happen. How does it affect the character? How does it affect the scene? What does the character do in response?
  2. Here’s my writing-is-fun example.
The dog bounded onto the car and into the dumpster, nose first. He didn’t reappear at first. You would expect that he was scrounging for a tasty morsel, a leftover from an over-picky child. But when he leaped from the dumpster, he was barely the same dog! He was wearing sunglasses and a black leather coat! He popped open the car door with his nose, hopped in, and started the car. He was a spy dog! 
Day 164
Writing
  1. Now write the end of your story. What happens?
  2. Here’s my example. Yours can be longer, but my baby is crying and I gotta go!
He spun the car around and spotted me. As he drove past, he winked at me and said, “You didn’t see anything.”
Day 165
Writing
  1. Read your story out loud. Fix any awkward places.
  2. Look for spelling, capitalization and punctuation mistakes. Fix them.
  3. Make sure there is transition from one paragraph to the next.
  4. Publish when you are ready.
  5. Read your story to an audience.
Day 166
Writing
  1. You are going to start your end-of-the-year project. Step one is to choose a topic. It should be about what we’ve been studying in science and/or history. You should read your science and history assignments to see if you have an end of the year project for those subjects that can be combined with this report. After you’ve read your science and history assignments for today, choose your topic.
  2. You will be recording your resources, where you got your information from, and what you learned. The info lines provided to write on will be short. Don’t try and copy a sentence. Just write bits to remind you like, made in 1902, or Teddy Roosevelt. This will help you not copy what others wrote.
Day 167*
Writing*
  1. *Work on your research. Fill in three resources today.
Day 168*
Writing*
  1. *Work on your research.  Fill in three resources today.
Day 169*
Writing*
  1. *Work on your research. Fill in three resources today.
Day 170
Writing
  1. Today, write your introduction. I’ll copy below what I wrote you before about an introduction. Also, look at this sheet for more ideas for a great opening line. It also has other ideas for starting your other paragraphs and for making your writing more interesting.

My previous help on introductions:

  1. Read about writing an opening sentence.
  2. You are going to write an introduction for your research report. It needs to be at least three sentences long.
  3. The last sentence is going to be your main idea. It will tell the main idea of your research report. It should be as specific as is possible.
  4. Your first sentence should be interesting. It should make people want to read your biography. An easy way to get people interested is by asking them a question. Other ways include using a quote or by making an interesting observation.
  5. Here’s my example from before when you wrote your biography.
  6. opening sentence: Ever wonder what makes someone great?
  7. middle (no details yet):  History has many greats. One man in particular was a great leader at an important time in America’s history.
  8. main idea of the whole biography (called the thesis): George Washington was a great leader when America needed one.
Day 171
Writing
  1. Today you are going to organize. Think about your introduction. What is your thesis? What is the point you are going to make with your research report? You need to use your facts to make that point.
  2. Gather your facts into groups. All of the facts in each group should be about one topic. The goal would be to have five groups of at least two facts. Before you had who, what, where, when groups. You can have different groups this time. Try and use the facts you have and see how they relate to each other.
  3. Color code them. Mark the ones that go together all the same color. Then make a key. Example: Write “when” with a blue colored pencil and draw a light blue line through each when fact.
Day 172
Writing
  1. Today you will continue organizing. You are going to decide the order that you are going to use your groups. If you are doing the Panama Canal, maybe one topic will be how it was made. If you have enough facts, you could divide that into two topics. One paragraph could be about the structure of it and how it was designed. Another paragraph could be about who worked on it and when and the cost. Another topic could be how it changed the world. That could be broken down into two or more paragraphs. One paragraph could be about shipping and economics. One paragraph could be about how it changed the landscape physically and the country politically. These are just suggestions. I’m just trying to give you some idea of what it means to break your facts into groups which are each going to become paragraphs.
  2. As you look at your groups, decide if any of them can be split into two mini groups. Do you need any more facts to fill in a group?
  3. Get all of your facts into groups. Label each group. Decide on their order.
Day 173
Writing
  1. Today you are going to take your topics and write an outline. You will use this Online Outline Maker  to enter in your information. Work on a computer that you can print from
  2. You have already written your intro. For your outline, you are just going to be working on the body of your report.
  3. You will “Add a Main Section.” These are your topics. Each one of these will be your paragraphs. The goal is to have at least five.
  4. Then you will click on “Add” and then click on your topic box. Write in a fact. Do it again with all of your facts. If you have more than three facts for a topic, think about how you can divide the topic into two mini topics.
  5. Print your outline and save it!
Day 174
Writing
  1. Today start with your first topic on your outline and begin writing. Remember that the first sentence of your paragraph gives the main idea for that paragraph. Each paragraph has a main idea sentence, the details that tell about that idea and a conclusion sentence.
  2. You need to write two paragraphs today unless you intend on writing a really long report. Once, in seventh grade, I wrote a report that was 27 pages long! (It did have some pictures and diagrams, though.)
  3. Use short sentences and long sentences that use words like and/because….
Day 175
Writing
  1. Write at least two more paragraphs. Make sure they are written in the right format. Also, think about how to transition from one paragraph to another. Remember transition words?
Day 176
Writing
  1. Write another paragraph or two today. Use a sentence that starts with “When….,….”
  2. Try and finish all of your topic paragraphs listed on your outline.
Day 177
Writing
  1. Write your conclusion. The first sentence of your conclusion retells your “thesis” or main idea of your report. Don’t use the same exact sentence from the introduction! You need to add another sentence and then conclude with a final sentence. Your final sentence should give meaning to your report. Use the word “I” and tell what you think of the whole thing, why is it important.
Day 178
Writing/Grammar
  1. Look at this editing guide. Judge your report. Where do you need to do some work to make it better?
  2. Read your report out loud. Mark anywhere that sounded weird to you.
  3. Fix all the problems.
Day 179
Writing
  1. Today make sure your report is the way you like it. Add a title or a title page. Finally, you are going to add a bibliography, a list of all the resources you used to get your information.
  2. Make a page with the title, Bibliography.
  3. This video will tell you how to write out your resources in a list on that page.
  4. Here is a written bibliography help.
Day 180
Writing/Speaking
  1. Publish and present!
  2. Save this in your portfolio!
  3. Congratulations on finishing fourth grade! You learned so much this year!

Summer school:
Practice your parts of speech with The Big Escape. There are four of these games on the site.
Read and write every day, just for fun! Write anything: coded messages, treasure hunt clues, scavenger hunt lists, a letter to the future you, a movie script, a book for your little brother…