Easy Peasy All-in-One Homeschool

A complete, free online Christian homeschool for your family and mine

Fifth

Please contact me if you find a problem with a link.

Daily Progress Chart

Materials:

Students: If you come across a word that you don’t know or don’t know how to pronounce, you can type it into this dictionary and click on the speaker icon.

Day 1

Welcome to your first day of school! I wanted to give you one important reminder before you begin. Many of your lessons below have an internet link for you to click on. When you go to the different internet pages for your lessons, please DO NOT click on anything else on that page except what the directions tell you to. DO NOT click on any advertisements or games. DO NOT click on anything that takes you to a different website. Just stay focused on your lesson and then close that window and you should be right back here for the next lesson. Okay?

*I wrote a lot of directions on your school. I wrote them all for a reason. Read all of the directions carefully and follow them carefully. Don’t just click on the links without reading first. Here is a worksheet to practice following directions.

Math

  1. An important reminder as you are beginning the year…If you click on a link and the link is not working please do not just skip it or find something similar to use, let your parent know so that we can get this fixed right away for you and for other users.

Reading

  1. We are going to read poems by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. He is an American poet that was born in 1807.
  2. Read poems 01 and 03 on this page.
  3. Retell poem 01, The Arrow and the Song, in your own words.
  4. What is happening in the poem, The Children’s Hour. (Answers)
  5. What does he describe his chair as? (Answers)
  6. What does he call the dungeon? (Answers)
Writing
  1. Copy the stanza of the poem with “dungeon.”  (A stanza is a section of a poem. There is a space between each stanza to show you where one stops and the next starts.)
  2. What two words rhyme?  (answer:  heart and depart)
  3. A rhyme scheme tells you how many lines the stanzas have and which lines of the stanza rhyme. We write a rhyme scheme using letters and matching letters show which lines rhyme. If it was an AABB rhyme scheme, then the first two lines would rhyme and the third and fourth lines would rhyme.
  4. The rhyme scheme in this poem is ABCB. That means that each stanza in this poem has four lines. The matching letters tell you which lines rhyme.  In this poem the B lines rhyme, meaning the second and fourth lines rhyme.
  5. Reread that stanza out loud.
  6. Write a stanza of the poem with the same rhyme scheme.
Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3   Year 4

Day 2

Math
Reading
  1. Read poems 06 and 07.
  2. Both of these poems follow this format: Longfellow is observing something and then relates that to his life in a different way. Find the break in each poem where he switches from describing what he’s looking at to comparing that to his life. (Answers)
  3. In The Rainy Day what is he observing? (Answers)  (hint: Look at the first stanza.)
  4. He then starts thinking about his life. He’s thinking about how he’s getting older and things haven’t all turned out in his life how he hoped. Then he scolds himself for complaining (“repining”) and reminds himself that every life has problems (“Into each life some rain must fall”).
  5. In Nature what is he observing?  (Answers) (hint: Look at the beginning of the poem.)
  6. He then starts thinking about life. He compares it to getting older, little by little until we die. He’s not sure what he feels about it, but he thinks that what’s beyond death is a lot bigger than what’s on earth.
Writing
  1. Copy the last line. “How far the unknown transcends the what we know.”
  2. Transcend means to go beyond. He is saying that the unknown is much bigger than what we do know. What do you think he’s talking about? (hint: He was just talking about dying.)
Computer
  1. Internet Safety Reminders: Do not download anything onto your computer without permission. Do not click on any advertising on a website even if it looks like a game to play. You can also turn off advertising, so you don’t see bad images. Don’t give out your name, age, address, phone number, email address, photo, etc. online without permission.
  2. Do you remember these words: browser, desktop, window, crash, loading, refresh, download? Explain them to someone. If you can’t, ask them to explain them to you.
Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3   Year 4

Day 3

Math

Reading
  1. Read poems 11 and 15.
  2. What words create the sad mood of poem 11? What words show the feeling Longfellow sees in the snow fall? (Answers)
  3. Can you tell from the poem what he says caused the sadness? (Answers)
  4. What is the rhyme scheme of poem 11? (Answers)
  5. Who is The Castle-Builder about? (Answers)
  6. What is he doing? (Answers)
  7. What does Longfellow say to the boy? (Answers)
Writing
  1. Choose a mood to write about. (happy, sad, surprised, angry, frustrated, silly, confused, excited…)
  2. Make a list of words that describe that feeling or are synonyms with the mood word you chose. Where would you observe happy people? What would they be doing?
  3. Write a poem in the style of Snow-Flakes. Write at least one stanza. Reread the first stanza of the poem out loud to get the feel of the rhythm of the poem. Poems don’t just have rhyme; they have rhythm, but more than anything, they have feeling.
  4. Use at least three words from your mood-word list.
  5. Here’s my example. It’s not perfect. Yours doesn’t have to be either. Try your best!
  • Coming in through the door,
    “Long-time, no see,” they offer big hugs,
    Suitcases laid down on the floor,
    They take a seat for fun on the rugs,
    All tickles and smiles,
    Happy they came the miles.
Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 4

Math

Reading
  1. Read poem 17Children.
  2. What is the mood of this poem?  (Answers)
  3. What words reinforce that mood?  (Answers)
  4. What does he think/feel about children?  (Answers)
  5. What metaphor does he use in the last stanza? A metaphor compares two unlike things. He does it A LOT! In the second stanza it reads “thoughts are singing swallows.” That’s a metaphor. It says A is B when the two are not the same. But comparing the two, calling thoughts “swallows” creates a feeling and image for the reader. Alright. Look at the last stanza. What is the metaphor? What does he call children? (Answers)
  6. Now look at the stanza, fourth from the bottom. What is the metaphor? The world is being compared to a tree. What tree word is in the stanza? (Answers)
  7. It goes with the stanza before it. It’s talking about the children being like the leaves of a tree. Read those two stanzas–beginning with “What the leaves are….” The world is compared to trees. The children are compared to leaves. What is he saying about children with this metaphor. (Answers)
Writing
  1. What is the rhyme scheme of this poem?  (Answers)
  2. Write a joyful stanza with this rhyme scheme.
Thinking
  1. Choose a thinking game from level 4-6.
Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3   Year 4
Day 5

Math

Reading
  1. Read five poems from this site.
  2. Which is your favorite?
  3. What is its rhyme scheme, rhythm?
  4. Write a funny poem with this rhyme scheme.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2   Year 3   Year 4

 

Day 6

Math
Reading
  1. Longfellow has many famous poems, but one of the most famous is called Paul Revere’s Ride.
  2. Do you remember that Paul Revere is one of the men who rode to warn the American minute men that the British troops were planning on attacking. He hung two lanterns in a church tower to let everyone know from where the British were going to attack.
  3. This video is a reading of the poem with Longfellow animated like he is saying it.
  4. If you want to read along, it is poem number 22.
Spelling/Vocabulary
  1. Here are some words from the poem that you might not know: belfrymooringssomberimpetuousgilded weathercockspectral glareaghast
  2. Copy all of the words and either write or draw a definition of each. (You can draw for words like somber and aghast and write for belfry, etc.)
Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3   Year 4

Day 7

Math
Reading
  1. Read along with this video of another famous Longfellow poem.
  2. Now watch at least a couple of minutes of this video. It is the cartoon version of the story.
  3. How is the cartoon Hiawatha in the beginning not like the Hiawatha described in the poem? Think about their relationship with the animals? (Answers)
Grammar
  1. Play this parts of speech game. Uncheck prepositions.
Computer
  1. Internet safe search — When you want to find something on the internet, you have to be careful how you look for it. Here are some tips. Be as specific as possible in your search. Type as many words as you know that will help you find what you are looking for. That will help keep things you are not looking for from coming up. Google also has a way to turn on “safe search,” though this isn’t 100% safe for sure. Also, use kid friendly search engines. Here is one place you can go to search.
Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 8

Math
Reading
  1. Read the short introduction to the next poet you are going to read. (at the top of the page)
  2. Read poem 06, A Day, by John Greenleaf Whittier.  (same page as #1)
  3. What does he describe in this poem? (Answers)
  4. How does he feel about what he sees?  (Answers)
  5. What does disconsolate mean?  (hint: He is NOT disconsolate. Look at the words that come before and  that follow to see how he is feeling. Disconsolate is the opposite.)
Writing
  1. What rhyme scheme is this poem in?  (Answers)
  2. Choose a season and describe it in at least one stanza using the same rhyme scheme.
  3. Before you write, read a stanza out loud to get the rhythm of the poem.
Grammar
Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 9

Math
Reading
  1. Read poem 11, Requirement
  2. What are some of the things Whittier lists as things God requires of us?  (Answers)
  3. What does the poem say we can have faith in?  (Answers)  (hint: last line)
  4. What does the poem say God does not require of us?  (Answers)  (hint: Here’s a picture of a knotted scourge.)
Writing
  1. Can you see the rhyme pattern in this? It’s a little harder because it’s not broken into stanzas. (Answers)
  2. Where is the exception in the rhyme pattern? (Answers)
Grammar
  1. Play this adverb game . (You may need to scroll down for the game.)
  2. Play word invasion. Uncheck prepositions.
Thinking
  1. Choose an activity from levels 4-6.
Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

 

Day 10

Math
Reading
  1. Read Psalm 150.
  2. What repeats in this poem?  (Answers)
Writing
  1. Write a psalm that starts each line or most lines with “Praise Him!”
Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3  Year 4
Day 11
Reading
  1. Read poem number 05 by Christina Rossetti.  Here are some pictures: harebell   lily  rose
  2. Notice the repetition in this poem?   is like is repeated comparing love, hope and faith to flowers.
  3. What does the poem and this Bible verse have in common?  (Answers)
  4. The lines that compare faith, hope and love to flowers are called similes. (si – mi – lees, the i is like in it)
  5. Similes are when you compare two things that are not similar and you do it using the words like or as. In this poem Rossetti used like.
  6. Love is like a rose.  Love and rose are two very different things. She’s creating a feeling about love using the image of a rose. She compares them using the word, like.
Writing
  1. Some other examples of similes using like are: sleep like a baby and run like the wind. If you say someone runs like the wind, you are saying they are very fast. You are comparing a person to the wind using the word like.
  2. Write a simile for cold, soft and hungry. How long and creative can you make them? You could say, “Hot like fire.”  Or, you could say, “Hot like a hamburger on a grill at high noon on the fourth of July in Texas.” Which is more interesting?
  3. Next time you are writing a story and want to say that something or someone was hot, what will you write?
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2    Year 3    Year 4
Day 12
Reading
  1. Read this poem called Flint by Rossetti.  Here are some pictures:  emerald    ruby   sapphire
  2. What things are being compared?  (Answers)
  3. What point is the poem making?  (Answers)
Writing
  1. These similes use the word as to compare.
  2. Read through these examples of similes.
  3. Write three more similes. This time use as in all of them.  as slow as …   as funny as …   as hard as …
  4. How would you use these in a story? She was sentenced to a morning of cleaning her room. As she picked clothes up off the floor she moved as slow as ….
Computer
  1. Internet Safety — Here are some tips for staying safe when you use the internet. Never sign up for anything online without permission. When a site asks for a username, you are not supposed to give your real name. Make up a pretend name for yourself. Never tell anyone online your real name, address, phone number or email address unless your parents tell you it is okay. Even if it’s a friend online, don’t give them information about yourself unless you have permission.
  2. Internet security — There are different tools that are used for security on the internet. One is passwords. A password is a secret word that you use to let the computer or website know that you are you. The best passwords have letters and numbers in them. I use a really good password for important websites (that you don’t use–like for my bank information) but I use a silly password for websites where it is not important, like to play a game. Use only one or two passwords or you’ll forget which password you used where! So many places ask for passwords now. Choose passwords that are at least 6 letters/numbers long. Sometimes 8 is required. Another tool is software that protects your computer from viruses and adware. A computer virus is a command that sneaks into your computer and tells it to do something you don’t want it to do, like erase everything on your computer! Adware sneaks advertisers info onto your computer. You probably have anti-virus software on your computer. A free program is called Avast. Your computer should block ads that are called “pop ups.” Sometimes you’ll see a note that says a “pop up” was prevented from opening. This was a website trying to force their advertisement on you. Sometimes worse. Most of the time you don’t want to see the pop up that was blocked, but sometimes you need that pop up for whatever you are doing. If you want to see the pop up that was blocked, go and ask a parent if it is okay.
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 13
Reading
  1. Read poem 15 by Rossetti.
  2. What is the structure of this poem? What do you observe about it?  (Answers)
Writing
  1. Write one tangible and one intangible thing that can answer these questions. What are big? What are thieves? What’s good medicine? If you can’t think of answers to these, but you can think up your own questions and answers, then go right ahead and use your own questions.
  2. You can see my answers, but they aren’t the only right answers. (Answers)
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3   Year 4
Day 14
Grammar
  1. Play this verb and adverb game.
Writing
  1. Use at least one question from day 13 and one simile from both day 12 and day 11 and write a poem.
Thinking
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 15
Math
Reading
  1. Read poems 19 and 23.  Poem 19 is a hymn. All songs are types of poetry. The book of Psalms is a book of poetry. Poem 23 is writing against slavery. The two stanzas I’ve copied below seem to be saying that Muslims have freed their slaves. Moslem means Muslim. A “turbaned” Bey is a man wearing a turban. The “Prophet” is Muhammad.  Kebla is the direction Muslims turn to pray. Fetters are like handcuffs. Islam (Muslim religion) did not get rid of slavery, but Islam forbade Muslims enslaving other Muslims. This part of the poem might be referring to that thought that a Muslim would not have a Muslim slave. (They would happily have slaves though.) He uses Islam to contrast what he’s saying about Christians.

Oh, shame! the Moslem thrall,
Who, with his master, to the Prophet kneels,
While turning to the sacred Kebla feels
His fetters break and fall.

Cheers for the turbaned Bey
Of robber-peopled Tunis! he hath torn
The dark slave-dungeons open, and hath borne
Their inmates into day:

2. The next stanza is about the Christian slave. He says being a Muslim can free a slave. What does he then say about being a Christian slave? (Answers)

But our poor slave in vain.
Turns to the Christian shrine his aching eyes;
Its rites will only swell his market price,
And rivet on his chain.
3. What’s the point he’s trying to make with this poem?  (Answers)
4. Paul writes to a slave owner. His letter is the book of Philemon. The New Testament doesn’t outlaw slavery directly. It teaches us to love and treat others the way we love and treat ourselves. That pretty much outlaws slavery in its own way. How does Paul encourage the slave owner to treat his slave?  (Answers)
Vocabulary
  1. You just learned what fetters are. What do you think unfettered means?  Now look at it in this sentence. Now that the weather is warmer the children can run unfettered by coats, hats, scarves, mittens and boots. What does unfettered mean? See if you are right.
  2. Do this vocab matching game.
  3. Write a sentence using intangible and a sentence using fettered.  (hint: Unfettered means not fettered, and intangible means not tangible.)
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 16
Math
Reading
  1. Here is a new poet, Paul Lawrence Dunbar.
  2. Read the paragraph at the top of the page about him and then read poems 01 and 02.
  3. Look at the title of 01. Who is he writing about? (hint: Day 8)
  4. What is the title of 02? What does sympathy mean?  (Answers)
  5. The poem is in three parts. The first, “I know what the caged bird feels,” creates what scene/mood outside of the cage?  (Answers)
  6. What words contribute to the feeling of the stanza? (Answers)
  7. The scene of the first stanza is contrasted with the bird in the cage.
  8. What is the bird feeling? We can make an inference (an educated guess) based on the second stanza. What is the bird doing? What is he feeling? What is he wanting?  (Answers)
  9. Why does the caged  bird sing?  (Answers)
  10. Why does Dunbar have a special Sympathy for the caged bird?  (hint: Did you read the introduction on the page?) (Answers)
Writing
  1. How many lines are in each stanza of Sympathy?   (Answers)
  2. What is the rhyme scheme of Sympathy?  (Answers)
  3. There is a typo in the second stanza of the poem. Use your understanding of the rhyme scheme to find which word is wrong.  (Answers)
  4. Write a poem using the same rhyme scheme (and so the same number of lines in a stanza) as this poem.
Vocab
  1. Do this vocab matching game again. Do you remember them?
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 17
Math
Reading
  1. Read poem 06.
  2. Poem 06 is about what?  (hint: the title)
  3. The poet doesn’t just say, “This is what October is like.” How does he talk about October?  (Answers)
  4. This is called  anthropomorphism. That’s when something that isn’t alive (like October) becomes human-like. What are some things October does in this poem that make “her” like a human? (Answers)
  5. What is the poet talking about when he says:
  • “the months pay bounty to her store”   (hint)
  • “decks herself in garments bold…”
  • “Nor cares when Frost stalks o’er her way
    And turns her auburn locks to gray.”
Writing
  1. The easiest example of an-thro-po-morph-ism is any cartoon where an animal acts like it’s a person.
  2. The easiest way to write anthropomorphism is to use the word “I.” Write a short “Who Am I” story. Here’s an example.
    • I sit all day helping others sit. You get to stand and stretch your legs, but I am stuck sitting, sitting, sitting. And not only that, but I give you a nice soft place to sit, and what do I get to sit on? The hard floor! Is that fair?  (Who am I?)   (Answers)
Grammar
  1. Take the sentence quiz. Reminders:
  • Subject is what the sentence is about. The simple subject is the noun; it’s cup instead of the blue cup.
  • Predicate is the rest of the sentence, what the subject does. The simple predicate is the verb; it’s ran instead of ran all the way home.
  • Imperative sentences give a command. Declarative sentences make a statement. Interrogative sentences ask a question. Exclamatory sentences exclaim.
  1. Check your answers, unit 1. If you got any wrong, GO BACK and look at the right answer and figure out why that answer is right. If you can’t figure out why you were wrong, ask a parent or (write and ask me).
Computer
  1. Your browser’s cache (say: cash) is a memory of a website. You can view the cache of a webpage even if you aren’t connected to the internet. It won’t be updated. It will be an old image of that webpage. Some browsers use the cache to open web pages more quickly, bringing up a previous version of the page. If you expect a change on a page and you reload it but don’t see the change, it’s like that you are seeing an older version of the page from the cache. If you need to see the change on the page, you can try and hit (ctrl and f5). If that doesn’t work go to your browser’s tools or settings and look for a clear cache option.
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 18
Math
Reading
  1. Read poem 03The Lesson, by Paul Dunbar.
  2. What lesson did he learn?  (hint: last two lines)  (Answers)
Writing
  1. Write a one-sentence summary of each stanza. Look up any words you need to know. A “bleeding heart” is like a “saddened heart.”  (Answers)
Grammar
  1. Take this grammar quiz.
  2. Then check your answers, unit 2. If you got any wrong, GO BACK and look at the right answer and figure out why that answer is right. If you can’t figure out why you were wrong, ask a parent or (write and ask me).
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 19
Math
Reading
  1. Read poem 11The Sparrow.
  2. There is a metaphor in this poem. Remember that a metaphor calls one thing something else, comparing them. What does he call birds? (Answers)
  3. The second stanza mirrors the first stanza. Longfellow wrote this same way. He observed something and then would relate it to something totally different. Dunbar writes about a bird on his windowsill. What does the bird do? (Answers)
  4. What is the lesson or warning in the second stanza? (Answers)
Grammar
  1. Take this grammar quiz.
  2. Then check your answers, units 1-2 review. If you got any wrong, GO BACK and look at the right answer and figure out why that answer is right. If you can’t figure out why you were wrong, ask a parent or (write and ask me).
  3. Play metaphor battleship. Choose “easy.” You click on squares to try and find their hidden battleships. Yours are revealed to you. The enemy tries to find your battleship. When you hit a ship, you have to complete a metaphor.
Thinking
  1. Hooked on Books
  2. Cookies Crumble
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3   Year 4
Day 20
Math
Reading
  1. Read poem 13, Dreams.
  2. He uses a simile, compares two things using like or as. What does he say dreams are like? (Answers)
Grammar
  1. What’s a metaphor and what’s a simile? Remember: both similes and metaphors compare two things that aren’t alike but similes use “like” or “as.”
Writing
  1.  Choose your favorite poem from what you’ve read these 20 days. Write a poem in the same style, scheme, etc. Then read the poem and your poem in front of your family.
  2. Make sure you save all of the poems you write.
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 21
Math
Reading
  1. Just listen to a poem by E. E. Cummings. Click on the play button.
Writing
  1. Read the last page of this pdf on types of poetry.
  2. We’ve looked at how poems can create moods, feelings. Both of these types of poems you just read can create moods or feelings.
  3. Write one diamante and one sensory poem following the directions carefully.
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 22
Reading
  1. Just listen to a poem. Click on the play button.
Writing
  1. Scroll down to where it says “Rhyming” (toward the bottom).
  2. Read the section with the examples.
  3. Write a couplet, a triplet and a quatrain.
Computer
  1. Another piece to your browser’s memory is called cookies. Cookies are what enable your browser to remember your usernames and passwords and what things you normally search for; also enables stores to follow what pages you look at on their websites to know what you might be interested in. Go look at all of the cookies stored on your computer. There are lots and lots probably. I don’t know what browser you are using but try looking for them under tools and privacy. Search for how to find them if you can’t. In Chrome you go to settings, under the hood, then content settings to find your cookies. Warning: if you delete all of your cookies, sites won’t remember your usernames and passwords for you anymore. We get so used to having them filled in for us that we forget what they are. Don’t delete anything without your parents’ permission.
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2    Year 3     Year 4
Day 23
Reading
  1. Just listen to a poem. Click on the play button.
Writing
  1. Scroll down to Limerick.
  2. Read the section and examples. Read the examples out loud to get a sense of how they sound (what they are talking about with the Us and Ss; it’s just about how it sounds).
  3. Write two limericks.
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 24
Reading
  1. Just listen to a poem. Click on the play button.
Writing
  1. Scroll down to Haiku.
  2. You can use the links for more help and ideas.
  3. Write two haiku poems.
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 25
Reading
  1. Pick a poem to read.
Writing
  1. Scroll down to Explorer Poems.
  2. Here is where you can read her students’ explorer poems. Read some of them.
  3. Write a poem with facts from either what you are learning in history or in science.
OR
  1. Put 10 poems into a book. Work at a computer with a printer. Get permission if you want to print in color. There can be a lot of color in one page. You can choose background colors for each page.
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 26
Math
Reading
  1. Read A Song.
  2. What does it mean that there is “ever a song somewhere”?  (Answers)
Writing
  1. Write 10 of your poems into a book. Work at a computer you can print from. Make sure everything is spelled correctly. Give it to your parents to hold onto. This might be something for your portfolio.
Speaking
  1. Read through this page out loud acting out the different ways to say the sentence. When it writes “quarrel” slanting upwards, that means your voice goes up (like when you ask a question.) See if you can follow their directions and make yourself sound excited, surprised, etc.
Vocabulary
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 27
Math
Reading
  1. Read The Journey of Life.
  2. It says that it’s an allegory. At the end it says that an allegory is a truth told in the form of a story. The story is a traveler going down a path, walking through a wood. What is the truth being told?  (Answers)
  3. The people he meets along the way are all parts of his life. What are the parts of his life we see on the journey?  (Answers)
Writing
  1. Write examples of each of the following: simile (day 11), metaphor (4), anthropomorphism (17), declarative sentence (17), interrogative (17) sentence, exclamatory sentence (17), imperative sentence (17).
Computer
  1. Open up a new document in your word processing program. Make a mini poster for your mom (or someone else.) Use photos, clip art, shapes, color, word art, different fonts, etc. Tell Mom thanks. Write “Thanks” on your poster. Use the photos and clip art to show her what you are thankful for. Save and print.
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 28
Math
Reading
  1. Read Try Again! and True Manliness (click next at the top of the reading to find the second reading).
  2. Answer the questions at the end of Try Again. For the last question think about what motto you would want to live by. You don’t have to say, “Try again!”    (Answers)
  3. What qualities always go along with true manliness?  (Answers)
  4. Read the vocabulary lists at the end of each story. Here are two in particular we’ll focus on:
  • languid  feeble
  • amply  fully
Writing
  1. Write an anthropomorphic story. Look around the room you are sitting in. Choose an inanimate object, something that’s not alive. Write a short story as that object. Use the word “I” like that object is the one thinking and speaking in the story. For example, I’ll choose the laptop I’m working on. I could write: All day I’m stared at. How rude is that! If that weren’t rude enough, then they sit there and poke at me…
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 29
Math
Reading/Vocabulary/Writing
  1. Read The Miller of the Dee and A Boy on the Farm and Meddlesome Mattie. (click next at the top of the reading to find the second and third readings).
  2. Read the definition sections as you come to them. Here are a few we will add to our vocabulary list.
  • indispensable – absolutely necessary
  • perpetually — continuously
  • economize — save money by doing things in a way that costs less
  1. What was the miller wrong about?  (Answers)
  2. How much value do chores have according to the author?  (Answers)
  3. Do the first part of the Exercise at the end of Meddlesome Mattie.
  4. snuffbox is a box for holding snuff. Snuff is powdered tobacco (what’s in cigarettes.) It says it was written almost 100 years ago. Go to the beginning of the book and look for the copyright date. It’s before the Preface. About when was the story written?  (Answers)
Thinking
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 30
Math
Reading
  1. Read The Eagle and The Old Eagle Tree(click next at the top of the reading to find the second reading).
  2. Read the definitions and do the exercises.
Vocabulary
  1. Here are words to remember from these stories:
  •  immense  – very great
  • dispersed  – scattered
  • unavailing – useless
  • clamorous - noisy
Writing
  1. Write a short story using all of the vocabulary listed immediately above. If you can include any words from days 28 or 29, go get a high five and/or a hug.
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 31
Math
Reading
  1. Read A New Kind of Fun  and Two Ways of Telling a Story. (click next at the top of the reading to find the second reading).
  2. What new kind of fun did the student find?  (Answers)
  3. What are the “two ways of telling a story?”
  4. Do the exercises out loud at the end of the second story.
Vocabulary
  1. Do this PuzzleFast vocabulary crossword puzzle.
  2. New words:
  • capsize   overturn
  • venerable   deserving of honor and respect
  • populous   full of inhabitants

Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3   Year 4

Day 32
Reading
  1. Read Harry’s Riches through the Indian legend. (click next at the top of the reading to find the next three readings).
  2. Summarize each of the four readings.
Grammar
  1. Take this adjective quiz.
  2. Check your answers (unit 4) when you are done.
Computer
  1. Open up a new document in your word processing program. Make a mini poster for dad (or anyone else). Use text boxes and in each box write a word that describes your dad or whomever you have chosen.
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 33
Reading
  1.  Read Harry and His Dog through The Tempest. (click next at the top of the reading to find the next two readings).
  2. Do all of the exercises.  (If you aren’t sure of the first answer, look in the last paragraph.)
Vocabulary
  1. Here are some more words to remember:
  • inverted  upside down
  • vigilant   watchful
  • subside   become quiet or calm
  • generation   people born within the same time period
 Grammar
  1. Play Power Proofreading. Choose 5th grade. Choose Luke’s Music Talk.

Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 34
Reading
  1.  Read An Adventure with Wolves and The Old Oaken Bucket. (click next at the top of the reading to find the second reading).
  2. Do the exercises after the poem.  (Answers)
Writing
  1. Find a simile in the first story. (hint: look on the second half of page 98)
  2. A simile is a description using like or as. What is the author describing?
  3. Rewrite that part of the sentence. “I….like a….”
Grammar
  1. Take this grammar quiz. (The answer to number 5 is b.)
  2. Check your answers (units 1-4) when you are done.
Thinking
Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4
Day 35
Reading
  1. Read America’s national anthem. Read the whole thing, but the song ends after “brave?”
  2. Read the definitions at the end.
  3. Sing the anthem with your family if you like.
Vocabulary
  1. Do this vocabulary matching game.
Writing
  1. Write a short story using at least three of the vocabulary (bold) words from day 31 or day 33. Get a high five and/or hug if you use five or more.

Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

 

Day 36*

Math

Reading
  1. Read Burning the Fallow and Piccola and The Mountain and the Squirrel. (click next at the top of the reading to find the next two readings).
  2. Here is a picture of burning the fallow, setting fire to uncultivated land to clear it. It is a technique that’s been used a lot but should never be used on a hot, windy day. Why, do you think?
  3. Retell the story of each.
  4. Reread the first sentence of the first story. Make a guess as to what sultry and abate (abating) mean from the context of the story. (Answers)
  5. What is the simile in the first sentence?  (Answers)
  6. Any idea of what that simile means? Here are several images of things that billow.  (Definition: a large sea wave, although it usually refers to a big cloud)  Now what do you think the simile means?
Vocabulary
  1. Do the vocabulary 3 matching game. (My son picked out the all red background.)
Writing*
  1. *We’re going to start writing a five-paragraph essay. Choose a topic you are studying for school in history or science to write about. Print out this flower organizer and write a fact about your topic in each petal.  Write your topic in the middle or at the top of the page.

Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 37

Math

Reading
  1. Read “Strange Story of Ants
  2. Tell someone some of the strange stories of ants.
Writing
  1. Do you remember what the five paragraphs to a short essay are? (answer: introduction, 3 main points, conclusion)
  2. Today choose your three main points. To do that look at your facts. Can they be organized into three topics? If one doesn’t fit, it’s okay to leave it out. You need at least two facts for each point you want to make. Write the numbers 1, 2, 3 and mark which facts go together. On the back of your page write what your three points are going to be. For instance, for an essay on the pyramids on the back write, “1. The pyramids were made by workers, not slaves.” Then write the number 1 on the petal facts that would go with that topic. (Example 1. Workers were paid with bread and beer.)
Grammar
  1. Try this noun exploration game. They are going to show you two choices. You pick the one written correctly. Some of them are plurals and you have to pick which is spelled correctly and some are abbreviations, like Mr. or in. for inches. Do your best.
Computer
  1. This year in computer class you are going to create a blog. Today you are going to decide on what your blog will be. Decide what you are going to share about. It can be a place where you share what you learn in school, a place where you share a hobby, a place where you share your artwork or photographs, it can be a place where you share what normal things you do each day, it can be a place where you share what you believe. Think about it. Think of a title. Write down your title and a description of your blog’s purpose.

Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3   Year 4

Day 38

Math

Reading
  1. Read The Four MacNicols.
  2. Tell someone the story. Make sure you explain who the characters are, where and when it takes place and what happens in the beginning middle and end.
Writing
  1. Write your introduction. The first sentence should catch the readers attention. Use a strange fact or ask a question or use an interesting quote. Then say something about your topic but don’t give your facts yet. The last sentence is your thesis statement, your topic sentence. This sentence tells what your essay is going to be about. Don’t write, “My essay is about…”
  2. Here’s an example.
  • You’ve seen pictures of pyramids, right? Did you know that each stone in a pyramid weighed as much as a car? The pyramids were built with a lot of hard work, but also with a lot of intelligence. The pyramids were an amazing feat of engineering.
  1. Did I get you interested with my questions and interesting fact?
  2. What is my thesis or main topic?  (answer: The pyramids are an amazing feat of engineering.) 
Grammar
  1. Today do Power Proofreading. Click on 5th grade and “Pick and Pet Farm.”

Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 39

Math

Reading
  1. Read “The Ride to London” by Charles Dickens.
  2. Read the last paragraph of the story out loud for an audience. Say, “Yoho!” with enthusiasm! Practice reading out loud to yourself first so you can read it fluently.
Writing
  1. Today write one of your middle paragraphs. Decide what order they will go in to make the most sense.
  2. Your first sentence should be your topic sentence, your main point. (Ex. You might imagine that the pyramids were made by slaves, but really they were built by paid workers.)
  3. Then you write your facts. Try to write three sentences for this part, but I would rather you write two long sentences than three short ones.
  4. Then you write your conclusion sentence.  Ex. Pyramid workers not only were not slaves, but they had comfortable lives and also the noble purpose of serving their king.
Grammar

Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 40*

Math

Writing*
  1. *Today for reading and writing you are going to complete these worksheets on similes.
  2. You can give this to a parent to add to your portfolio.
Vocabulary
  1. Do this vocabulary matching game – game 2.
  2. Take a screen shot of the game (in the middle) and print it out. Write on it your name and the date and give it to a parent to add to your portfolio.

Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 41

Math

Reading
  1. Read On the Banks of the Tennessee,   Good Will and The Good Reader. Make sure you read the definitions. (click next at the top of the reading to find the next two readings).
  2. Do the exercises for Good Will.  (Answers)
Vocabulary
  1. Do the vocabulary 3 matching game. (My son picked out the all red background!)
Spelling
  1. Play this spelling game. Choose intermediate.
  2. Play word builder. Make sure you read the directions!

Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 42

Math

Reading
  1. Read The Golden Touch. Stop at number VI. You will finish it tomorrow.
  2. Tell someone what happened so far.
  3. What was his biggest fault?  (Answers)
  4. What do you think is going to happen?
Grammar
  1. Today do Power Proofreading. Choose 5th grade and “The Morning News.”
Writing
  1. Today write the next of your middle paragraphs. Below are the directions I gave you on Day 39.
  2. Your first sentence should be your topic sentence, your main point. (Ex. You might imagine that the pyramids were made by slaves, but really they were built by paid workers.)
  3. Then you write your facts. Try to write three sentences for this part, but I would rather you write two long sentences than three short ones.
  4. Then you write your conclusion sentence.  (Ex. Pyramid workers not only were not slaves, but they had comfortable lives and also the noble purpose of serving their king.)

Computer

  1. Go to wordpress.com. Click on get started. With your parents’ permission. Fill out the information to secure a blog all of your own. Write in the title you decided on. Use that as your domain name, mytitle.wordpress.com  If it is not available, play with it until you find one that’s available. Don’t just pick randomly. It will help people find your blog address if it relates to your blog!

Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 43

Math

Reading
  1.  Finish reading The Golden Touch. Start at VI.
  2. Tell someone the rest of the story.
  3. Were you right about what was going to happen?
Grammar
  1. Take the pronoun quiz. This is easier than the last one.
Writing
  1. Today write the last of your middle paragraphs. Below are the directions I gave you before.
  2. Your first sentence should be your topic sentence, your main point. (Ex. You might imagine that the pyramids were made by slaves, but really they were built by paid workers.)
  3. Then you write your facts. Try to write three sentences for this part, but I would rather you write two long sentences than three short ones.
  4. Then you write your conclusion sentence.  (Ex. Pyramid workers not only were not slaves, but they had comfortable lives and also the noble purpose of serving their king.)

Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 44

Math

Reading
  1. Read The Gentle Hand.
  2. Tell someone about the story. Why does it have its title?
Grammar
  1. Take this verb quiz. If you get it wrong, read the explanation. (You can read the explanations if you get it right as well.)
Writing
  1. Today write your conclusion, the last paragraph of your essay.
  2. The first sentence of your conclusion should retell your thesis statement or topic sentence from your introduction. DON’T just copy the sentence, though. Tell it in new words.
  3. Your paragraph should have three to five sentences.
  4. The last sentence of the paragraph should tell us why you wrote about it, what’s so important about this, why should we care about this…Make some sort of statement. Here’s my example of a conclusion.
  • The pyramids are remarkable considering the time they were built in. Other cultures remained primitive while the Egyptians were engineering colossal wonders. I think the pyramids prove that God was right when he decided to confuse the languages of the people on earth. He said, “Nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them.” (Genesis 11:6b NIV1984)

Thinking

  1. Choose a game from levels 4-6.

Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 45*

Math

Reading
  1. This is your last story in this book. This is a very famous story. I’m linking to another version online that has pictures. If you want it read to you (with the pictures and everything) as you read along, use this version.
  2. “Some researchers believe that the tale has inspired the common English phrase “pay the piper“. To “pay the piper” now means to face the inevitable consequences of one’s actions, possibly alluding to the story where the villagers broke their promise to pay the Piper for his assistance in ridding the town of the rats.” This is a quote from Wikipedia. What consequences did the townspeople have to pay because they broke their promise? (Answers)

Writing*

  1.  Edit your essay.
  2. Here is an editing checklist. I would just add that there are connecting words to transition between the paragraphs.
  3. Add a title, your name and the date. Print your essay when you are sure it’s your best. Give it to your parents to add to your portfolio.

Grammar

  1. Alphabetical order online
  2. Sentence game online  choose no timer

Click on what year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 46

Math

Reading
  1. Choose an Aesop’s fable.
  2. Write the moral of the story.
Spelling
  1. Put the months in alphabetical order. If their first letters match, look at the next letter to see which comes first.
Vocabulary

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 47

Math

Reading
  1. Choose an Aesop’s fable.
  2. Write the moral of the story.
Grammar
  1. Read through each section on dialog tags. Use the words along the top to move to new sections. Click to see more examples.
  2. It is okay to use said. Most kids only use said. You will see in the books you read that authors use said. If they said it, they said it. But if they answered or whispered or retorted or yelled, then say so. Try and use words other than said in each dialog you write.
Writing
  1. Write a dialog between two animals.
Computer
  1. Go to your dashboard. Click on posts. Delete the post that wordpress.com left for you. Click on new post. Write something. Anything. Click on publish. Ta da!

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 48

Math

Reading
  1. Choose an Aesop’s fable.
  2. Write the moral of the story.
Grammar
  1. Fill in the dialog with the correct punctuation.
Writing
  1. Write a dialog between two characters in history. King Tut and Neil Armstrong…whoever you like!

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 49

Math

Reading
  1. Choose an Aesop’s fable.
  2. Write the moral of the story.
Grammar*
  1. *Print page 16 of the pdf. Read page 15 and then correct the punctuation on the printed page.
  2. When you are done, check your answers on page 17.
Writing
  1. Write a dialog between you and someone in your family OR anyone you like.

Thinking

  1. Choose a game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 50

Math

Reading
  1. Choose an Aesop’s fable.
  2. Write the moral of the story.
Writing
  1. Write a fable with the moral, “It’s what’s on the inside that counts.”

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 51

Math

Reading
  1. We are going to start reading The Treasure Seekers by Nesbit. She is the author of The Railway Children. This link is just for those who want to download the book onto an ereader.
  2. Learn about the parts of a story. We’ll look for these in the novel as we read.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 52**

Math

Reading*
  1. Today we’ll start reading. Start chapter one and stop in the middle of page 7. Where it says, “Father is the bravest man in the world.”
  2. Here’s the audio version if you want to listen while you read along.
  3. *As you read you will keep track of the plot, the characters and the settings by filling out these pages, little by little as you read. (The Story of the Treasure Seekers)
  4. We only read a short bit today, because there is a lot to get started on in filling out these pages. Fill out the character page. Each circle is for one of the kids. Maybe you could draw each face or just use it to write in their names. Then write in the lines provided what you know so far about each character. You’ll learn more later, so don’t fill it all in right not. And I’ll give you one hint about who is telling the story, the “I” character: People like to talk about themselves.
  5. Then I want you to fill in one plot block. What is the background to the story?
  6. Next fill out one setting section about where they live, what you know so far about it.
Grammar*
  1. *Print out page 3. Read the first page and then complete the worksheet. (Answers)
Computer
  1. Make sure you are logged onto wordpress.com. Go to your dashboard. Look where it says “Recent comments”. Go to your comments. Delete the comment wordpress.com left. Go to your first post you left the other day. (To do that just click on the title of your blog on any page.) Now leave a comment under your post. Click on comment. Look at your first post again and make sure your comment is there.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 53*

Math

Reading
  1. Finish chapter 1.
  2. Add what you can to characters and setting, but today I want you to write in the conflict. What is the children’s problem that needs resolving?  (Answers)
  3. In the first plot box I want you to include the children planning ways to get treasure.
Spelling*
  1. *Print spelling worksheets  pages 11 and 12 of the pdf. (They are pages 3 and 4 of the workbook.)
  2. Complete page 3 today. Remember…short a as in hat, short i as in hit, short o as in hot, short u as in hut
Writing
  1. How would you come up with money? Write a paragraph. Make sure to start your paragraph explaining what you are going to be writing about. The person you give your paragraph to may have not read this assignment and may have no idea what you are talking about. Come up with two ways–one reasonable, one crazy.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 54

Math

Reading
  1. Read chapter 2.
  2. What makes the beginning of this chapter so interesting to read? (answer: The author talks directly to the reader.)
  3. How did the coin (half-crown is a coin) get in the garden?  (Answers)
Spelling
  1. Complete the second spelling worksheet (from Day 53). Check your work to make sure you spelled everything right!
Writing
  1. Write a short story (it can be just one paragraph) about a problem and how you solved it. It can be anything from getting gum stuck on your shoe to being new and not having any friends.
Thinking
  1. Try a brain booster.
  2. You can pick another game too.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 55

Math

Reading
  1. Read the first half of chapter 3. Read until the end of page 40; stop at the picture.
  2. What can you fill in on your character, setting and plot sheets? Don’t write everything that happens, just a few words or a sentence that tells the main action.
Writing
  1. Read pages 7 and 8. It is a sample story written by a fifth grader. It also has the teacher’s comments in different categories. Pay attention to the corrections given by the teacher! They will make your writing better.
  2. What was good and what was not good about the story?

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 56*

Math

Reading
  1. Finish chapter 3.
  2. What more do you know about the children, the main characters of the story. Have you learned anything else about any of them?
Spelling*
  1. *Print pages 9 and 10 of the workbook, pages 17 and 18 of the pdf.
  2. Complete page 9.
Writing
  1. Read pages 10 and 11. It is a sample story written by a fifth grader. It also has the teacher’s comments in different categories. Pay attention to the corrections given by the teacher! They will make your writing better.
  2. What did the student do well? What could the student have done better?

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 57

Math

Reading
  1. Read chapter 4.
  2. What can you fill in on your character, setting and plot sheets?
Spelling
  1. Complete page 10 of the spelling workbook.
Writing
  1. Read pages 24 and 25. It is a sample story written by a fifth grader. It also has the teacher’s comments in different categories. Pay attention to the corrections given by the teacher! They will make your writing better.
  2. What did the student do well? What could the student have done better?

Computer

  1. Go to your dashboard (make sure you are logged on.)
  2. Click on themes. Browse the themes and choose one.
  3. Make sure it has places for pictures, writing, and widgets (side bar).
  4. Try and choose something that says “flexible.” That means you’ll be able to change it.
  5. Preview different ones you like and then “activate” one of them.
  6. If your theme has a photograph that you can change, change it if you want to.
Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3     Year 4

Day 58

Math

Reading
  1. Read chapter 5.
  2. What can you fill in on your character, setting and plot sheets?
Grammar
  1. Read about compound and complex sentences.  Do exercises A, B and C.  (Answers)
Writing
  1. Write two compound sentences and two complex sentences.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3   Year 4

Day 59

Math

Reading
  1. Read chapter 6.
  2. What can you fill in on your character, setting and plot sheets?
Vocabulary
  1. Play two level four vocabulary games.
Writing
  1. Read about voice  and do the exercises.  (Answers)

Thinking

  1. Choose a thinking game.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 60

Math

Reading
  1. Read chapter 7.
  2. What can you fill in on your character, setting and plot sheets?
Grammar
  1. Review the different types of sentence structures.
Writing
  1. Read about word choice and do the exercises. (Answers)

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 61*

Math

Reading
  1. Read the first part of chapter 8. Stop at “Poetry” on page 122 of the book.
  2. What section for the children’s paper would you write? What would it say? (Instructive, Scientific, Answers…)
Spelling*
  1. Print pages 23 and 24 of the pdf  (pages 15 and 16 of the spelling workbook)
    .
  2. Complete page 15 of the spelling workbook.
Writing
  1. Get out your short story about the problem you solved.
  2. Score it just like in the examples. Don’t just give it a number. Write each category and write what was good or bad about it.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 62

Math

Reading
  1. Finish reading chapter 8.
Spelling
  1. Complete page 16 of the spelling workbook.
Writing
  1. Rewrite your short story. Fix all the problems so that it would get a perfect score.
Computer
  1. Let’s look at widgets today. Go to your dashboard. Click on widgets. Look around for it.
  2. There is a long list of widgets. Choose one and drag it to the right.
  3. Now click on the title of your blog to go look at it. What changed on your blog?
  4. To get rid of something on your sidebar, on the widget page drag it down to the bottom where there is a place for discarded widgets.
  5.  On your side bar you should have a search bar, and links to your previous posts.
  6. Click and drag those options to the side bar area.
  7. You can go ahead and make other changes to your sidebar now if you like.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 63

Math

Reading
  1. Read the first part of chapter 9. Stop at the top of 141.
Writing
  1. Read pages 29 and 30. It is a sample story written by a fifth grader. It also has the teacher’s comments in different categories. Pay attention to the corrections given by the teacher! They will make your writing better.
  2. What did the student do well? What could the student have done better?

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 64

Math

Reading
  1. Finish reading chapter 9.
  2. What does G. B. stand for?  (Answers)
Writing
  1. Complete this page on writing complete sentences.  (Answers)
  2. You don’t have to rewrite all the sentences, add in the commas and write what conjunction you would add.

Thinking

  1. Choose a thinking game.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 65*

Math

Reading
  1. Read chapter 10.
  2. Who is Lord Tottenham? What do they want to do with him and why?  (Answers)
  3. What can you add about Oswald on your character sheet?
Grammar*
  1. *Complete the exercises on possessive nouns.  (Answers)
  2. You don’t have to rewrite all the words or sentences. You can just add the ‘s or just write the words you need to for the answer.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 66*

Math

Reading
  1. Read the first part of chapter 11. Stop at the top of page 183.
  2. Write a one-sentence summary of the children’s plan for getting money in this chapter.
Spelling*
  1. Print out pages 29 and 30 of the pdf  (pages 21 and 22 of the spelling workbook).
  2. Complete page 21.
 Grammar
  1. Complete exercise B.  (Answers will vary, but each one should contain a possessive, meaning a word with an apostrophe showing that something belongs to it.)

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2   Year 3     Year 4

Day 67

Math

Reading
  1. Finish chapter 11.
  2. According to Mr. Mallow, what makes wretched children and degraded parents?  (Answers)
  3. What do wretched and degraded mean?  (Answers)
Spelling
  1. Complete page 22 of the spelling workbook.
Writing
  1. Complete exercise C.

Computer

  1. Today let’s make a post. Click on posts on the left hand side of the page.
  2. Move your mouse under the post you already made and click on trash (unless you really love it).
  3. Click on “Add New.”
  4. Write a title for your post.
  5. Type your post.
  6. Write about what your blog is going to be about.
  7. Add a picture. Click on the rectangle inside a rectangle picture next to “Upload/Insert.” It should say, “Add an Image.” Choose a picture off of your computer to put in the post. If there isn’t a good one, then search clip art Wikipedia online and save a picture to your computer first. (Right click on the picture and click on save as.)
  8. Save the draft of your post when you are done.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2      Year 3     Year 4

Day 68*

Math

Reading
  1. Read the first part of chapter 12. Read to the top of 207.
  2. What are some of the ingredients the children tried in their medicine?
Grammar*
  1. Print out the first and second page.  Read the lesson on adverbs and do exercises A and B. In A just cross out the adverbs you don’t need. Don’t rewrite the sentences.  answers will vary for most

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 69

Math

Reading
  1. Finish chapter 12.
  2. What was Oswald’s noble deed? (Answers)
  3. What was the only treasure they got out of the venture?  (Answers)
Grammar
  1. Practice the comma rules.

Thinking

  1. Choose a thinking game.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2   Year 3     Year 4

Day 70

Math

Reading
  1. Read the first part of chapter 13. Read to the top of page 234.
  2. What did they do after the caught the robber?  (Answers)
Writing
  1. Read the example at the top and then complete exercise C. Make sure you use lots of commas to practice!

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 71*

Math

Reading
  1. Finish chapter 13.
  2. Who was the robber?  (Answers)

Spelling*

  1. *Print out page 35 of the pdf. This is page 27 of the spelling workbook.
  2. Follow the directions and complete the worksheet.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3   Year 4

Day 72

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 15.
  2. Did you notice we skipped 14? It’s called the “Divining Rod.”  Divination is a form of magic. It is forbidden by the Bible. They try and use a stick to find where gold is buried underground. Even though, of course, it doesn’t work, we don’t need to read about them practicing evil.
  3. Write a summary of the chapter.

Grammar

  1. Try the quiz on subject and object pronouns after looking at the examples below. Click to read the explanations, even if you get them right.
  2. Let me help you out. Look at this example:
  • The dog chased my brother and ____.
  • What goes in the blank, me or I? An easy way to check is by taking out the extra person.
  • The dog chased ____.
  • Now it’s easy to know the answer, right?
  • Try it the other way. Read the sentence below. Should you add in I or me?
  • My brother and ____ ran home.
  • Take away the extra person.
  • ____ ran home.
  • Now you know!
  • (answers: The dog chased my brother and me. My brother and I ran home.)

Computer

  1. Today we are going to edit your post. Go to the dashboard.
  2. Under “Drafts” find and click on the title of your last post.
  3. Make any changes you want. Click on publish.
  4. View your post. Move your mouse to the name of your blog in the top corner. Edit should appear in the drop down menu. (If it’s not there, make sure you are logged in.) Click on edit.
  5. Click on update under the edit box.
  6. Click on “posts” or “all posts” on the list on the left of your screen.
  7. Click on quick edit under the title of your post.
  8. Click on “make this post sticky.” This means that post will always be first.
  9. Type in the tag box some words that describe your post: school, photography,… it helps people searching for things on that topic to find you.
  10. Click on update. That’s your save button.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 73

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 16.
  2. Congratulations on finishing another book!

Writing

  1. Today you are going to write a summary of the novel. This is going to become part of a book review. Type your summary and SAVE IT!
  2. When you write your summary, it should be in the present tense.
  • Here’s an example of the present tense: In the beginning of the story life is happy for Cinderella, but then her father dies. Her step mother makes her a slave to the family.
  • This is the same thing in past tense (Don’t do this!): In the beginning of the story life was happy for Cinderella, but then her father died. Her step mother made her a slave to the family.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 74

Math

Writing

  1. Complete exercise A . When you write, choose great verbs like these!
  2. Write two reasons why you liked the book. Follow the directions below. Type your work on the same document as your book summary.
  3. Write your reason as a topic sentence, the first sentence of a paragraph. In The Treasure Seekers the author….
  4. Follow each reason with an example from the book that shows what you are talking about.
  5. Write a concluding sentence to each paragraph stating how the example shows the point you are trying to make.
  6. You should have two paragraphs written when you are done.

Thinking

  1. Have you ever played Cracker? Give it a try.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 75

Math

Writing

  1. Write an introduction and conclusion for your book review.
  2. The last sentence of your introduction should mention the two reasons why you liked the book. That’s your thesis statement, your main idea.
  3. The next paragraph will be your summary. That will be followed by your two paragraphs on the reasons you liked the book.
  4. Your last paragraph is your conclusion. Restate your reasons for liking the book — in a new way! Don’t use the same sentence as before. Say whether or not you recommend the book and who you recommend it to. Who do you think would like to read it? Write your final sentence with the word “I” in it. What is your final thought on the book?

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3   Year 4

Day 76

Math

Writing

  1. Look again at the examples and think about all of the different categories that the teacher commented on.
  2. Assemble all of the paragraphs of your book review together if you haven’t already.
  3. Think about how you could make better word choices or make longer sentences.
  4. Read your book review out loud.  Listen for trouble spots where it doesn’t sound right. Fix them.
  5. Take your time and make it right. This is all you have to do today.
  6. When you think your book review is great, add your name and date in the top right corner and a title to the top middle of the page.
  7. Print it out and give it to your parents to include in your portfolio.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 77

Math

Reading

  1. You are going to start a new book today, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. This book is adventurous, nonsense literature. What does nonsense mean? It makes no sense! You’ll have to accept that this book is most often quite crazy. So accept that and have fun reading it. The whole thing takes place as Alice’s dream.
  2. The book is similar to surrealism paintings. It takes elements of the real and then changes them into something completely unrealistic. Take a look at these paintings. In each one look for the elements of real and the elements that are unrealistic.  one  two  three  four
  3. Besides the surrealistic elements of the story (things that go beyond what is real), the story is about a girl growing up. Alice’s body changes in crazy ways and ways she can’t always control. She faces crazy things in this dream world and decides whether it is nonsense, confusing and needs more exploring, or whether she is curious about it and wants to explore it more. She has to learn what she can control and what is out of her control. Now and in the years to come your body is going to be growing and changing in ways you can’t control. Your feet may grow faster than the rest of you, tripping you up. You are going to have to learn to understand and control your new feelings. You will be seeing new things in the world and will need to make decisions about whether to reject things or learn more about them.
  4. Here is a link to the book if you want to download it.
  5. Decide which version you would like to read.  book form    audio book (dramatic reading with different people playing the different characters)
  6. Read the copywork and vocabulary sections on this page.
  7. In the copywork section, copy the second sentence that includes a simile. Does the simile make a picture in your mind? (hint: The two similes are the same.)
  8. Make sure you know the vocabulary.

Spelling

  1. Play word builder.

Computer

  1. Let’s edit your post again. Remember how? Click on dashboard, posts, and then “edit” underneath it.
  2. Along the top of the edit box are symbols. B stands for Bold. I stands for Italic. ABC is for striking out something.
  3. Test each button to see what it does.
  4. When you get to the last button it will give you more buttons. Test them out.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 78

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 1.  audio
  2. What is the name of Alice’s cat?  (Answers)
  3. What did the box under the table say on it?  (Answers)

Writing

  1. You discover a bottle that says “Drink me.” Write a short story about your discovery and what you do and what happens next.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 79*

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 2.  audio
  2. What did the White Rabbit drop when Alice spoke to him?  (Answers)
  3. Who does Alice think she turned into?  (Answers)

Grammar*

  1. *Print pages 1 and 2 of this lesson on superlatives. (That’s like good, better, best.)
  2. After you read the lesson and complete the activities and check your answers…Then answer this question. Is curiouser a word?  (Answers)

Thinking

  1. Choose a game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 80

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 3.  audio
  2. How does the Mouse try and help everyone dry off? (Answers)
  3. How does the Dodo propose everyone dry off?  (Answers)
  4. Who won the caucus race?  (Answers)
  5. The author, Carroll, is making fun of politicians. Here is a definition of a real caucus race. Carroll compares it to running in circles with no one really being “winner.” A dodo is a flightless bird. It’s often used to characterize someone stupid.
  6. For the dinner table: What does Carroll think of politicians? Is the political system something Alice thinks is curious or nonsense? What do you know about the political system of your country? What do you want to learn more about? What is nonsense? Ask your parents to share what they think is right or wrong about it.

Grammar

  1. What did Alice think the mouse was talking about when the mouse said “Mine is a long and sad tale”?
  2. Play this homophone game. Remember: homophones are when words sound alike but are spelled differently.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 81

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 4.  audio
  2. Who does the White Rabbit think Alice is?  (Answers)
  3. Who went down the chimney?  (Answers)
  4. Where does Alice put her foot and arm when she grows?  (Answers)

Vocabulary

  1. coax — to try to persuade someone
  2. Go and coax someone. To coax isn’t to force. You coax someone using gentle persuasion, flattery, etc.
  3. Were you successful?
  4. Play this vocabulary review game.

Spelling

  1. Complete this word search.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 82

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 5.  audio
  2. The Caterpillar said, “One side will make you grow taller, and the other side will make you grow shorter.” Sides of what?  (Answers)
  3. What did the Pigeon call Alice?  (Answers)
  4. If you would like and are allowed, here is a youtube video of a caterpillar turning into a chrysalis.

Vocabulary

  1. contemptuously – without respect, acting as if it is worthless
  2. languid – slow, lacking in interest
  3. contradict – to make an opposite statement
  4. piteous – pathetic or deserving pity

Writing

  1. Write each of the vocabulary words in sentences. Get a hug and/or high five if you can do it in two sentences.

Grammar

  1. Conjunctions

Computer

  1. Today we are going to insert media. Click on the star-like button in the line where it says “Upload/Insert.” Click on select from computer. Find your certificate or flyer that you made or something you wrote. Type in a title for it. Then click on insert into post. Now click on update. Then click on view page. Click on that link to the media you inserted. What happened?

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2      Year 3    Year 4

Day 83

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 6.  audio
  2. Livery was the dress of servants in a Victorian household.
  3. What did the first footman look like?  (Answers)
  4. What does the baby turn into?  (Answers)
  5. Why does the Cheshire Cat insist that Alice is insane? (Answers)

Grammar

  1. Play a verb game.

Writing

  1. The Duchess says, “If everybody minded their own business…the world would go around a great deal faster than it does.’” Alice disagrees. What do you think? Should people mind their own business or not? Which is better and why?

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 84

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 7.  audio
  2. Whose hair did the Hatter say “wants cutting”?  (Answers)
  3. How many days wrong was the Hatter’s watch?   (Answers)
  4. Why does the Hatter never have time to wash his tea cups?  (Answers)

Grammar

  1. Read the review lesson on possessives and do the exercise at the bottom of the page.

Thinking

  1. Choose a game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 85

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 8.  audio
  2. Where did Alice hide the gardeners?  (Answers)
  3. What does the Queen want to do to everyone? (Answers)

Vocabulary

  1. furrow – as a noun it’s a groove or trench, as a verb it’s to make furrows or to wrinkle (You can furrow your brow, which means to scrunch up your eyebrows and make wrinkles on your forehead. Try it.)
  2. provoke – to anger, enrage, exasperate

Writing

  1. Write about what you think makes a good leader. Is a good leader like the Queen who rules with threats? What qualities make a good leader and why? How would those qualities affect those they lead?

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3   Year 4

Day 86

Math

Reading

Read chapter 9.  audio

  1. What is “the thing Mock Turtle soup is made from”?  (Answers)
  2. Why did Mock Turtle say they call the Old Turtle “Tortoise”?  (Answers)
  3. Read the paragraph “Meaning 6″ at the top of the page. Can you see how the saying is so similar. What letter did he change, into what other letter? In America it would be, take care of the pennies and the dollars will take care of themselves. What do you think that means?  (Answers)

Vocabulary

  1. ambition – a strong desire to do or to achieve something
  2. derision — contemptuous ridicule or mockery
  3. mock — not authentic or real, but without the intention to deceive
  4. venture — a risky or daring journey or undertaking
  5. Play this Alice in Wonderland vocab review game . Choose a game. It will ask you questions. For each right answer you get to play the game you chose.

Spelling

  1. Unscramble the words. These are all words from your vocabulary game. If you are stuck, scroll up and find the words in bold. They are all from your reading of Alice in Wonderland.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 87*

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 10.  audio
  2. No wise fish would go anywhere without what?  The answer is a pun, a play on words. Any ideas where you shouldn’t go anywhere without?  (Answers)
  3. While other Wonderland characters have acted contemptuously toward Alice, the Mock Turtle and Gryphon try and listen to her experiences in Wonderland. But, do they really understand her? (Answers)
  4. Here’s a video of a real quadrille. Scroll down to find the video.

Vocabulary

  1.  tremulous – shaking or nervous

Writing*

  1. Do this compare and contrast exercise. Notice all of the transition words that show that two things are being compared or contrasted. Pay attention to the words in italics in the box.
  2. You are going to start writing a compare and contrast essay. You will compare (tell how they are the same) and contrast (tell how they are different) the last two novels you have read, Treasure Seekers and Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.
  3. *Use this sheet (Compare and Contrast) to list things that are the same about the books. I’ll tell you two things. They were both written in the last half of the 19th century and they were both written by English authors. Those might not be important to your paper, but we’re not thinking about that now. You are just trying to think of as many things as possible of how they are similar. Here’s a question to get you started, who is the main character in each book? If you are really stuck, you can go here for some ideas to get the juices flowing. (Answers)

Computer

  1. Today you are going to add a poll to your post. Click on the circle in the upload/insert menu. Choose a poll format and question and answers. Add it to your post. Click on update to save it.
  2. Go to your dashboard and click on settings. Change your “tagline” to fit your blog.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 88

Math

Reading
  1. Read chapter 11.  audio
  2. Who was the last witness called?  (Answers)
  3. What does Alice feel happening to her?  (Answers)

Vocabulary

  1. sulk – to be silent because you are in a bad mood, to pout
  2. verdict – the decision in a court case; a judgment

Writing

  1. Use your sheet from yesterday and write ideas for what’s different about the two books. One thing to do is to look at your list of how they are the same and think about when they stop being the same. They both have a child for the main character, but the one book has 4 children. They both start at a family home, but the one leaves reality and goes to a surrealistic land. They both have adventures, but… They both are trying to solve problems, but… (Answers)

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 89

Math

Reading
  1. Read chapter 12.  audio
  2. Why does Alice feel confident to stand up to the Queen?  (Answers)
  3. Where does Alice wake up?  (Answers)
  4. What does her sister imagine about Alice?  (Answers)
  5. Before she leaves wonderland, she grows to her full size and speaks up for herself. So in the end, Alice does/will grow up, but that doesn’t mean she will lose the fun or play of childhood. She will take the memory of Wonderland with her.
  6. Explain how the book is about growing up. Day 77 and Day 89 will help you.

Writing

  1. You are going to write your thesis statement today, the point your essay is going to make. FIRST, you need to decide on three different things that you can compare and contrast in your essay–ways they are the same and ways they are different. You can use my examples or your own. Use your lists for ideas.
  •  The differences and similarities in settings and characters.
  • The differences and similarities in their adventures.
  • The differences and similarities in how their problems were solved.
  1. Write your thesis statement, your main point. This will be your last sentence in your first paragraph. It should mention the three things that you will compare and contrast in your essay.

Thinking

  1. Choose a game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 90

Math

Reading

  1. Take this comprehension quiz.

Writing

  1. Write your introduction. Start with an interesting sentence–a quote, a question, a comment. Then tell about each book in a sentence or two. Then comes your thesis statement.
  2. On Day 89 you decided on three things to compare and contrast in your essay. For each one, write at least one way the books are similar and at least one way the books are different. (This isn’t part of your essay, just preparing for the next part of your essay.

Maybe your family would like to watch this Alice in Wonderland movie.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 91

Math

Vocabulary

  1. Play the Alice in Wonderland vocab game.

Spelling

  1. Try the spelling bee or the spelling challenge.
Writing
  1. Write one of your three middle paragraphs. Those three paragraphs are called the body of your essay.
  2. The first paragraph of the body should be about the topic you listed first in your thesis statement.
  3. The first sentence in the paragraph is the topic sentence for that paragraph. It’s your introduction for the paragraph and will tell what point you are going to make in that paragraph.
  4. Then comes the body of the paragraph. In this part you will include your examples.
  5. Then comes the conclusion of your paragraph. This sums up your point.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 92

Math

English

  1. Try this synonym (words that mean the same thing), antonym (words that have opposite meanings) and homonym (words that sound alike) game.
Writing
  1. Write one of your three middle paragraphs. Those three paragraphs are called the body of your essay.
  2. The second paragraph of the body should be about the topic you listed second in your thesis statement.
  3. The first sentence in the paragraph is the topic sentence for that paragraph. It’s your introduction for the paragraph and will tell what point you are going to make in that paragraph.
  4. Then comes the body of the paragraph. In this part you will include your examples.
  5. Then comes the conclusion of your paragraph. This sums up your point.

Computer

  1. Add an about page. Might already be one. Add a page or go to the about page.
  2. Write a description of your blog’s purpose. Remember not to share your name or photo without permission from your parents.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 93

Math

English

  1. Do all three thesaurus activities.
Writing
  1. Write one of your three middle paragraphs. Those three paragraphs are called the body of your essay.
  2. The third paragraph of the body should be about the third topic you listed first in your thesis statement.
  3. The first sentence in the paragraph is the topic sentence for that paragraph. It’s your introduction for the paragraph and will tell what point you are going to make in that paragraph.
  4. Then comes the body of the paragraph. In this part you will include your examples.
  5. Then comes the conclusion of your paragraph. This sums up your point.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 94

Math

Grammar

  1. Correct the capitals. You have to answer in your head completely, and then you can click the arrow to check. The light bulbs are for hints.

Writing

  1. Today you are going to write your conclusion.
  2. The first sentence of your conclusion restates your thesis. Don’t use the same sentence though!
  3. Add something new.
  4. End with a comment that sums up your thoughts on the books.

Thinking

  1. Choose a game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 95*

Math

Writing*

  1. Look again at this compare and contrast exercise. Notice all of the transition words that are in italics in the box. Do you use any of those. Would they help you write better sentences? Add at least one of those words into your essay (other than but).
  2. Read your essay out loud. Change anything that doesn’t sound right.
  3. *Use this checklist to see what needs improving.
  4. Fix your essay. Make it right.
  5. When you are pleased, print it out.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 96 (*opt)

Math

Reading

  1. During your reading of the next book, you are going to be practicing strategies that will help you to be actively involved in your reading.  You will make predictions and ask questions before you read, you will try to figure out things that confuse you, you will connect what you read with things that you already know (your Background Knowledge), and you will reflect after you have read before going on to the next assignment.   Active reading is much more than knowing words; it is bringing all that you are and know to interact with a text to make it more meaningful and fun for you — and more useful.  Don’t skip any steps.
  2. Our new book is called Little Men by Louisa May Alcott.  (That’s the link if you are going to download it.)
  3. There are two audio books that I found. One is by an American but without emotion.  The second is with a British accent but more lively.
  4. Read about the author.
  5. Look at the cover page of the book.
  6. Make some guesses. What is the book going to be about? What do you think is Plumfield? Who do you think is Jo?
  7. The author is Louisa Mae Alcott.  Write down something you already know about her.  What would you like to find out?  Read about the author.  What is something that surprised you.  What are you thinking?

Vocabulary* (optional to print out the vocabulary list)

  1. Read through this list (Little Men vocab 1) carefully and try and learn the definitions.
  2. Write a sentence OR draw a picture for each one.
  3. If you are confused about any word, ask for clarification.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 97*

Math

Reading

  1. Look at the title of the first chapter.  What would you like to find out?
  2. Read chapter 1, stopping on page 11 after you read the letter.
  3. What have you learned about Nat?
  4. What have you learned about Plumfield?
  5. About Jo?
  6. Who do you think Mr. Laurence is?
  7. What are you thinking?

Writing*  (Print 4 of these.)

  1. *Fill in a character sketch for Nat. Draw a picture of him and use quotes from the book to describe him on the lines. Use “” quotation marks around the words from the book and after each one write the page number (p. 15, for example).

Vocabulary

  1. Do this vocabulary matching exercise. These are the words from day 96.
  2. Just write down the letter answers in order and then click the key picture to check.

Computer

  1. Explore some other blogs. Note how they are using them — purpose. Note extras on the page — links, calendars, blogroll, about, sign up, twitter, tags, share this, ads?…onetwothreefourfivesix
  2. Go to your dashboard and click on settings. Change your “tagline” to fit your blog. Now go to widgets and add anything you noticed and liked while blog hopping.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3   Year 4

Day 98*

Math

Reading

  1. What would you like to find out as you read the rest of the chapter?
  2. Finish reading chapter 1.
  3. Now what are you thinking?  Does anything surprise you?  Does anything confuse you?
  4. Look at the title of the next chapter.  Predict what you might find out in Chapter 2.

Grammar

  1. Do you know? Choose the correct past tense of the verb. Learn from your mistakes! You DO NOT have to write down your answers. But you DO need to read the explanations of the answers. (The past tense tells what happened in the past.)

Writing*  (Print 2 of these.)

  1. Fill in a setting sketch for Plumfield. Draw a picture of some part of it and use quotes from the book like on Day 97 to describe it.
  2. Who is Jo and what is Plumfield?  (answer: Plumfield is a school and Jo is the woman in charge. It’s not a normal school though, is it? What’s it like?)
  3. What kind of place is Plumfield? Is it a strict? fun? Why?  (Answers)
  4. What are you thinking about this school?

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 99

Math

Reading

  1. Do you remember your prediction for chapter 2?  What do you expect/hope to learn in Chapter 2?
  2. Read chapter 2.
  3. Tell someone about the chapter.
  4. What kind of animal a dromedary is?  Have you ever seen one?  If so, where?
  5. After reading chapter 2, which boy is your favorite?  Why?  Which is your least favorite?  Why?  Is there one like you?  Which one?
  6. Each of the boys is at Plumfield school for a different reason.  Explain two of the reasons.
  7. What are you thinking?

Grammar

  1. Try again to choose the correct past tense. Read the sentences out loud. Make sure you read the explanations.

Writing

  1. Fill in a character sketch page for one of “the boys.”

Thinking

  1. Choose a game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 100*

Math

Reading

  1. Read the chapter title.  What do you predict will happen on Sundays at Plumfield?  Explain your thinking.
  2. Read chapter 3 to the end of page 40.
  3. Squab just refers to pigeon.
  4. On page 33 it talks about the family going on walks. What did they learn on walks? What do you think it means that there are “sermons in stones.”  (Answers)
  5. Think about a time when you were in a totally new environment and wondered how to fit in.  Who or what helped you to get adjusted?  Who or what is helping Nat?  How?

Writing

  1. Fill in a setting sketch for Demi and Tommy’s “private place.”

Vocabulary

  1. *Fill in this vocabulary crossword puzzle. These are the words from day 96.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 101

Math

Reading

  1. Finish reading chapter 3.
  2. “We will plant self-denial, and hoe it and water it, and make it grow so well that next Christmas no one will get ill by eating too much dinner.” p. 46   What does this mean?  (Answers)
  3. What makes Sundays special at your house?  Would you have enjoyed Sundays at Plumfield?  Why or why not?

Writing

  1. There were several others on the walls, but the boy thought there must be something peculiar about this one, for it had a graceful frame of moss and cones about it, and on a little bracket underneath stood a vase of wild flowers freshly gathered from the spring woods. p. 48
  2. Let’s write a sentence like this one.
    • There were several others on the walls. That could be a sentence all by itself. The subject is SEVERAL OTHERS ON THE WALLS. There is a predicate (the rest of the sentence containing the verb): THERE WERE  
    • Usually subjects come first, but not always.
    • Write a sentence.
    • My example: I ran home.
    • What is the subject and predicate of your sentence. (Hint: EVERY word is either part of the subject or part of the predicate.)
  3. Now let’s look at the next part of the sentence.
    • but the boy thought there must be something peculiar about this one
    • Without the BUT at the beginning, this could also be a sentence. The subject is THE BOY. The predicate is THOUGHT THERE MUST BE SOMETHING PECULIAR ABOUT THIS ONE
    • The BUT is a conjunction.
    • If we use a conjunction and following it with what could be a complete sentence, then use use a comma before the conjunction.
    • Take your sentence from before. Replace the period with a comma. Write a conjunction. Add another subject and predicate.
    • My example: I ran homebut the front door was locked.
    • What is the conjunctionsubject and predicate of the new part of your sentence.
  4. Now, let’s move on.
    • Next we find another comma and the word is “for.” That’s considered a conjunction, so we should find a subject and predicate in the next part of the sentence.
    • for it had a graceful frame of moss and cones about it  What is the subject? What is the predicate?  (Answers)
    • Now you write. Take your sentence and change the period into a comma, add a conjunction (and, or, but, so, for, yet, nor). Then add another subject and predicate.
    • Here’s my example: I ran homebut the front door was lockednor was the backdoor unlocked.
    • What is the subject and predicate you added?
    • If the subject and predicate of my new part confuses you, read it as a question, “Was the backdoor unlocked?” That makes sense, right? A question is a type of sentence, so you can see that my new part has everything a sentence needs.
  5. Last part…
    • and on a little bracket underneath stood a vase of wild flowers freshly gathered from the spring woods.
    • What is AND? Could this part of the sentence be a sentence on its own? If so, it has a subject and predicate. What is the subject? What is the predicate? Pay attention. The subject “does” the verb. What’s the verb and what’s doing that? (Answers)
    • Now finish your sentence. You’ll need another comma because you are using a conjunction and what could be its own sentence.
    • Take your sentence. Change the period into a comma. Add a conjunction and a subject and predicate.
    • Read your sentence to an audience.
    • Here’s my example: I ran home, but the front door was locked, nor was the backdoor unlocked, but I found my way inside through a hole in the porch screen.
    • It’s not complicated to write long sentences once you see how they are put together. I expect your sentences to grow!

Spelling

  1. Unscramble the words. These are from the vocabulary list you read day 96.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 102

Math

Reading

  1. What do you picture when you read the title to chapter 4, “Stepping-stones?”  What would you like to find out?
  2. Read chapter 4.
  3. Summarize the chapter for someone.
  4. What are you thinking?

Writing

  1. Do a character sketch for Father Baehr.

Grammar

  1. Do these punctuation exercises. Make sure you keep clicking Go On until it stops.
  2. Did it tell you that you did great or that you need to try again? Try again if that’s what it told you.

Computer

  1. Go to your dashboard and go to appearances. Click on each heading underneath to see what it does. Use one of these to change something on your blog.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 103

Math

Reading

  1. What is the title of Chapter 5?  What do you think it means?
  2. Read chapter 5. Stop at page 77.
  3. Draw a picture of the kitchen. (page 72)
  4. Does her description make it easy to draw? When you describe things, you have to think about making so that the people reading it “see” what you see when you are describing it.

Writing

  1. The sun shone in as if he enjoyed the fun, the little stove roared beautifully, the kettle steamed, the new tins sparkled on the walls, the pretty china stood in tempting rows, and it was altogether as cheery and complete a kitchen as any child could desire. p. 72 (I just marked the simple subject and simple predicate in each part–that means just the noun and verb from the subject and predicate.)
  2. What mood/feeling does the sentence produce?  (Answers)
  3. These commas are followed by subjects and predicates but not conjunctions. Why are there commas then?
  4. Write a list of things containing subjects and predicates.
  5. My example: On our street there are boys playing soccer, a bulldozer digging, a post man making his rounds, and pigeons watching it all.

Grammar

  1. Complete the grammar exercise. The underlined word is wrong. Correct it. Make sure you keep clicking Go On until it stops.
  2. Did it tell you that you did great or that you need to try again? Try again if that’s what it told you.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 104

Math

Reading

  1. What would you still like to find out in chapter 5?
  2. Finish reading chapter 5. Start on page 77.
  3. Summarize the chapter for someone.
  4. Do you understand the meaning of the chapter title now?  If not, how could you figure it out?
  5. Recall a special toy that you enjoyed as Daisy enjoyed her kitchen.  Describe it.  Why did you like it?

Vocabulary

  1. Do this vocabulary matching game.

Grammar

  1. Complete these grammar exercises. Make sure you keep clicking Go On until it stops.
  2. Did it tell you that you did great or that you need to try again? Try again if that’s what it told you.

Thinking

  1. Choose a game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 105

Math

Reading

  1. Read the title to chapter 6.  What do you think might be going to happen in this chapter?
  2. Read chapter 6. Stop on page 100.
  3. How are you feeling about Dan?  Why?
  4. What do you think is going to happen next?

Writing

  1. Choose a character from the book. Write a paragraph about ways you are like that character and ways you are unlike that character.
    • Your first sentence is your introduction: There are a few ways I’m like ________, but there are many ways we are different. (just an example)
    • Then you give examples from the book of what the character is like and tell how you are like that or not like that.
    • Then write your concluding sentence: I think that… I hope that…  (just examples of ways to start the final sentence.)

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 106

Math

Reading

  1. Finish reading chapter 6.
  2. What are you thinking?  Are you surprised that Dan could not or would not give up his wild ways?  Why or why not?
  3. Why do you think Dan had so much influence on the other boys even though they knew that what he was doing was not right?
  4. How is Dan a “firebrand?”

Writing

  1. Complete a character sketch for Dan.

Spelling

  1. Complete the spelling exercises. Check your answers and keep clicking on Go On when you get to the bottom of a page.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 107

Math

Reading

  1. Read the title to Chapter 7.  What would you like to find out?
  2. Read chapter 7.
  3. Write a one-sentence summary of the chapter.
  4. What are you thinking about Nan after finishing the chapter?  Do you like her? Why or why not?

Grammar

  1. Learn what a preposition is. Don’t get weirded out over the diagrams.
  2. Take a book. Place it in as many different places that you can think of and tell the prepositional phrase that describes where it is. (eg. Near the door, with the paper…)

Computer

  1. Today add a custom form to your about page. Click on the button all the way on the right in the upload/insert menu. Create a form for people to contact you. This way you don’t have to give them your email address.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 108

Math

Reading

  1. Read the title of Chapter 8.  What do you predict might happen in this chapter?
  2. Read chapter 8.
  3. Tell someone what happened in the chapter.
  4. Read aloud the verse to an audience. What does it mean?
  5. What surprised you in this chapter?

Writing

  1. Write a few sentences about an imaginative game that you and your friends have played.

Grammar

  1. Read the story. There is at least one preposition on each page. Make a list of all of the prepositions in the story.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 109*

Math

Reading

  1. Read the title to chapter 9.  What are you thinking?
  2. Read chapter 9.
  3. Read aloud the verse to an audience. What does it mean?
  4. What are you thinking now?
  5. Do you think the “punishment” for the boys, excluding them from the girls’ company and even Mrs. Jo’s, was a fair one?  Why or why not?

Writing

  1. Write a few sentences about a time that you apologized to someone for spoiling their fun and tried to make him/her happy again.

Grammar*

  1. *Print out this worksheet (Grammar Sentence Coding) and follow the directions. In the first sentence the subject is “Jack and Phyllis.” The predicate is everything that is not the subject. The prepositional phrase is “to the Colorado Mountains.” If you are confused by number three, think of it as a declarative sentence: You did help Matthew with his test.
  2. When you are finished, you can check your answers (Grammar Sentence Coding Answer Sheet).

Thinking

  1. Choose a thinking game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 110

Math

Reading

  1. What is the title of Chapter 10?  What are you thinking?
  2. Read the first half of chapter 10. Stop on page 166.
  3. Dan is called a Spartan. If you have studied ancient history, you will know who the Spartans were.  Use your background knowledge to explain why Dan is called a Spartan.  If you have not studied Sparta yet, do a little research to find out what it means to call someone a Spartan.
  4. In the beginning of the chapter the weather is balmy. Find out what that means if you don’t know.
  5. How are you feeling about Dan now? Why?
  6. What do you think will happen in the rest of the chapter?

Writing

  1. Write a story describing getting to ____________. Use at least ten prepositional phrases.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3     Year 4

Day 111

Math

Reading
  1. Finish chapter 10.
  2. Summarize the chapter for someone.

Writing

  1. Write about a time when you wanted to “be good” or improve some weakness in your character.  Did you ask God to help you?

Vocabulary

  1. Play a review game of your vocabulary.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 112

Math

Reading

  1. What is the title of Chapter 11?
  2. What do you already know about Uncle Teddy?  What more would you like to find out?
  3. Read the beginning of chapter 11. Stop on page 184.

Grammar

  1. Here’s a simple activity to remember some of the different prepositions.
  2. Do you remember that prepositions come in phrases?  Next to the door is a prepositional phrase. NEXT is the preposition. DOOR is the object of the preposition.
  3. “Over the river and through the woods to grandmother’s house we go…” Do you know that song? What are the prepositional phrases? What are the prepositions? What are the objects of the prepositions? (Answers)
  4. Here’s an easy quiz about prepositions and the object of a preposition.

Computer

  1. Add a new post.
  2. In the post type Easy Peasy Homeschool.
  3. Highlight it. Click on the paperclip in the menu above the typing box.
  4. Copy and paste this address into the top line. http://allinonehomeschool.wordpress.com
  5. Click on the box that says to open in a new window.
  6. Click okay.
  7. Publish and view your post.
  8. Click on the link to make sure it works.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 113

Math

Reading

  1. Finish chapter 11.
  2. Write a summary of the chapter.
  3. What questions do you still have about Uncle Teddy?  How is he related to Mother Jo?  If you could ask him something, what would you ask him?

Grammar

  1. Write in the prepositions.
  2. Take the quiz.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 114

Math

Reading

  1. Read the title of chapter 12.  What are you picturing?
  2. Read the beginning of chapter 12. Stop on page 207.

Speech

  1. Read the poem from the chapter out loud in front of an audience.

Writing

  1. Write a nursery rhyme about huckleberries.

Thinking

  1. Choose a thinking game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2   Year 3     Year 4

Day 115

Math

Reading
  1. Do you think the family will have a hard time finding Nan and Rob?  Why or why not?
  2. Finish chapter 12.
  3. What are you thinking about Nan’s punishment?
  4. Describe to someone the setting of this chapter. Think of what details the author includes.

Writing

  1. Write a few sentences about a time when you were lost or thought you were lost or thought you had lost someone for whom you were responsible. How did you feel?

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3     Year 4

Day 116*

Math

Reading

  1. What do you picture when you read the title of Chapter 13?  What do you think this chapter might be about?
  2. Read chapter 13.  What are you thinking after you have finished your reading?
  3. Read this lesson on point of view. At the bottom of the page, click to practice.

Grammar*

  1. *Print out and complete this prepositional phrase worksheet. Choose underline the prepositional phrase.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 117*

Math

Reading

  1. Read the title of Chapter 14.  Damon and Pythias were two Greeks famous for their loyal friendship, a little like David and Jonathan in the Bible. What do you think might happen in this chapter?
  2. Read the first part of chapter 14. Stop in the middle of page 244.
  3. What is your answer to the mysterious disappearance of Tommy’s money?
  4. What point of view is Little Men told from?   (Answers)

Grammar*

  1. *Print out and complete this prepositional phrases worksheet. Choose circle the preposition and underline the object and select. You can give this to a parent to add to your portfolio

Computer

  1. Today delete your posts if they weren’t serious. Dashboard, edit, delete.
  2. Write your first real post. What you want to share with the world. When you are done, save as a DRAFT! Don’t click on publish. Under the edit box there is a choice to save it as a draft do that.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3   Year 4

Day 118*

Math

Reading

  1. What do you think is going to happen?
  2. Finish reading chapter 14.
  3. What are you thinking?
  4. Read about Damon and Phythias.
  5. Why do you think Louisa Mae Alcott chose this title for Chapter 14? Write an answer in complete sentences. It should start like this, “I think Louisa Mae Alcott chose “Damon and Phythias” as the title for the chapter because…” Tell why and give an example.

Grammar*

  1. *Print out and complete this worksheet on pronouns in prepositional phrases. Choose the option with questions.
    • behind ME,  with US,  toward HIM   (not behind I, with we, toward he — those sound weird right?)

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 119

Math

Reading

  1. Read the title of Chapter 15.  What do you picture?
  2. Read the first part of chapter 15. Stop on page 266.
  3. Do you have a memory of a willow tree? Tell or write about it.

Grammar

  1. Try the adverb and preposition quiz. Learn from your mistakes!
  2. Here are the answers for when you are finished. Learn from your mistakes! Go back and see what the right answer was.

Writing

  1. Read the reminder on point of view at the top of the page and then click on each video and watch just a wee bit until you can determine if it’s in first or third person.

Thinking

  1. Choose a thinking game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 120

Math  (Time for a screen shot.)

Reading

  1. Finish reading chapter 15.
  2. What are you thinking?
  3. Demi said, “It’s very singular how hard it is to manage your mind.” Do you agree?  Why or why not? (You can just tell your answer.)

Writing

  1. Write a fractured fairy tale. Click on “Write Your Own Fractured Fairy Tale.” Follow the directions below, not on the screen.
    • Choose a fairy tale.
    • Read it.
    • Then write the story from another point of view. Type it in a word processing document.
    • Choose a character to be “I” in the story. For instance, in the Three Little Pigs you could write it from the wolf’s point of view. He could be the “I” and telling the story from his perspective.
    • You could give this to a parent to add to your portfolio. (You could also add one of your character and/or setting sketches.)

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 121*

Math

Reading

  1. While you are reading, look for the word coaxing. Do you remember what it means? Copy the sentence with coaxing in it. (Practice neat handwriting.) What is the subject? The predicate?
  2. Read the title of Chapter 16.  What do you know about taming an animal?
  3. Read chapter 16.
  4. Dan tames a colt in this chapter.
  5. On page 288 Mrs. Jo says that she is taming a colt too. What does she mean? (Answers)
  6. What are you thinking at the end of the chapter?

Vocabulary*

  1. Read over the vocabulary list carefully (Little Men Vocabulary 2).
  2. What other in-, ir- and -able words can you think of?

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 122

Math

Reading

  1. Read the title of Chapter 17.  What are you picturing?
  2. Read chapter 17 until after the poem on page 296.
  3. Write a one-sentence summary of what you read.

Speech

  1. Read out loud to an audience one of the essays or poems from the chapter. If you choose the shortest, you will have to decipher it first. Do not read it incorrectly as in the book. Figure out what each word really is and read it correctly.

Grammar

  1. Play Grammar Gorillas.

Computer

  1. Reread your post. Fix what you want to fix.
  2. Does your post have a picture? It should. Add one. But, you need to take your own or find a public domain photo.
  3. Does your post have any links? Try and add one.
  4. You should add something to each post. It should never be just writing with nothing extra.
  5. Publish your post.  (Print out the page for your portfolio.)

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3   Year 4

Day 123

Math

Reading

  1. What do you predict will happen in the rest of the chapter?
  2. Start on the bottom of page 296 and finish the chapter.
  3. Had you remembered that the boys had planned to give Dan a gift?
  4. Write a few sentences about a surprise gift that you received.

Writing

  1. Choose one of the essays in the chapter. Write feedback to the author. Here are the instructions for giving feedback. Here is the editing checklist. Write a note to the author. Tell what was good about the essay. Then offer specific feedback for how to improve it.

Grammar

  1. Play word invasion. Choose all parts of speech.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 124

Math

Reading

  1. Read the title to Chapter 18.  What are you picturing?
  2. Read chapter 18.
  3. Write a one-sentence summary of the chapter.

Writing

  1. Write a few sentences about a garden or a harvest feast that you have participated in.  Which crops would you enjoy the most?  Why?

Grammar

  1. Test your preposition knowledge. You have to click on “Test Your Knowledge” and “Prepositions.”

Thinking

  1. Choose a thinking game from levels 4-6.  (Print screen for your portfolio.)

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 125

Math

Reading

  1. Read the title of Chapter 19.  Make a prediction about who John Brooke is.
  2. Read the first half of chapter 19. Stop after the letter on page 324.
  3. What are you thinking?

Writing

  1. Write a letter to a friend or family member. You can use this online tool to help you. Pay attention to the capitalization and punctuation of the letter. Send your letter!

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 126

Math

Reading

  1. Finish chapter 19.
  2. Tell someone what happened in the chapter.
Writing
  1. If you have ever attended a funeral, write a few sentences about your experience, or write a few sentences about someone in your life that you would consider “kind and good.”

Vocabulary

  1. Play this game. These are your words from Day 121.
  2. The do the crossword puzzle.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 127

Math

Reading

  1. Read the title of Chapter 20.  What activities do you picture happening “round the fire” at Plumfield?  Think of two or three predictions.
  2. Start reading chapter 20. Stop on page 344.
  3. What are you thinking?  If you have a choice, do you prefer true stories or fiction (made up) stories?  Why?

Vocabulary/Spelling

  1. Play this game again.
  2. Complete the word search.

Computer

  1. Add tags and categories for your post. They describe your post so that people searching the internet can find you.
  2. Email the link to your blog to a few people and ask them to leave comments. In your dashboard under settings, click on discussion. Decide on your settings. You probably want to approve comments before they appear on your blog.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 128

Math

Reading

  1. Who do you predict will be the next one to tell a story?
  2. Finish reading chapter 20.
  3. On page 347 near the bottom, Aunt Jo calls the boys “insatiable Oliver Twists.” Louisa Mae Alcott is expecting her readers to know Charles Dickens’ story of Oliver Twist, a young orphan boy who got a lot of people mad at him by asking for “MORE” porridge when he was hungry.  This use of another story in your story is called a “literary allusion.”  It is one way an author can give information without really telling it, by expecting the reader to make a connection in her mind with another story that they both know.  “Insatiable” means “never satisfied.”   What did Jo’s boys want more of? (ANSWERS: stories)
  4. Write a one-sentence summary of the chapter.
  5. What are you thinking?

Grammar

  1. Play Grammar Gorillas.
  2. Play word invasion. Choose all parts of speech.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 129

Math

Reading

  1. What is the title of Chapter 21?  Have you noticed that the structure of the book follows the seasons of one year? What do you picture happening in this chapter?
  2. Start reading chapter 21. Stop on page 366.

Writing

  1. Complete this writing assignment. Read the page and fill in the blanks. Check your answers.

Thinking

  1. Choose a thinking game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 130*

Math

Reading*

  1. What would you like to find out before the book is ended?  Why?
  2. Finish chapter 21 and finish the book!
  3. What are you thinking?
  4. Is there anything you would still like to know about the “family” at Plumfield?
  5. Would you recommend this book to a friend?  Why or why not?
  6. *Complete this page for Little Men. (Book Summary)

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 131

Math

Reading

  1. Now you are going to be reading something very different. I wrote it!
  2. Read the first chapter of What I Learned Over Summer Vacation.
  3. Who is “the cackler?”  (Answers)
  4. What was the vocabulary word taught in the chapter?
  5. How does the story show the word’s meaning?
  6. Describe the main character.
  7. Watch this slide show about the 6 traits of writing. (We learned about these earlier this year.)

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 132

Math

Reading

  1. Read the second chapter of What I Learned Over Summer Vacation, Lift/Thrust. It starts on page 10.
  2. What are the main events of the chapter?  (Answers)
  3. What’s “the lost pencil?”  (Answers)
  4. What words were taught in this chapter?
  5. What do they mean?
  6. How does the story show the words’ meanings?
  7. Describe the character’s “voice.” What’s the tone? Is it serious? Informal? Funny? Conversational? Can you hear the “I” character talking in your head? What does the main character sound like?

Computer

  1. In your dashboard under settings, click on general, writing and reading and adjust them as you wish.
  2. Under settings click on privacy and sharing. Decide whether your site is invite only or you want people to share it freely all over the world. If you want to share, give them buttons to click on to share to facebook, etc.
  3. Create another page or sticky post, something that will always be there. (You can get rid of it later if you need to.) A sticky post will always be at the top of your blog. I have a sticky post on this blog as an introduction for new people.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 133

Math

Reading

  1. Read the third chapter of What I Learned Over Summer Vacation, Obstreperous. It starts on page 17.
  2. What word was taught in this chapter?
  3. What does it mean?
  4. How does the story show the word’s meaning?
  5. Do you think there’s a bit of balderdash in every story?
  6. Do you think the main character is obstreperous?
  7. The “ideas” I’m trying to get across is the meaning of the vocabulary words. Do I get across my ideas? Do the stories show the meaning of the vocabulary words?
  8. Irony means that something is the opposite of what you would expect. Why is it not ironic that Mrs. Carp came over to complain. (hint: look up the definition of carp)
    • “Mrs. Carp came over with her tomatoes. That was just a ruse. She wanted a reason to come over to complain. No irony there.”

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3   Year 4

Day 134

Math

Reading

  1. Read the fourth chapter of What I Learned Over Summer Vacation, Salient/Inconspicuous. It starts on page 23.
  2. What words were taught in this chapter?
  3. What do they mean?
  4. How does the story show the words’ meanings?
  5. What phrase does the main character say a lot? What are other things the main character says repeatedly? (Answers)
  6. Another writing trait is organization. Did the story “hook” you? Are you interested in reading from the first sentence of each chapter? Are you happy at the end of each chapter? Do the stories “wrap up” and leave you feeling like it’s complete?

Thinking

  1. Choose a thinking game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 135

Math

Reading

  1. Read the fifth chapter of What I Learned Over Summer Vacation, Perimeter/Circumference. It starts on page 27.
  2. What words were taught in this chapter?
  3. What do they mean?
  4. How does the story show the words’ meanings?
  5. Word choice is another writing trait. What about word choice in the stories? What are some words or phrases that make the story or stories exciting or interesting?
  6. What strong, exciting verb is used in this part of a sentence from the story?
    • “hail storm ripped through the sky like my big brother opening a box of marshmallow cereal”  (answer: ripped)
    • Why is this better than “it started to hail.”
    • Does the simile make an image in your mind?

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3   Year 4

Day 136

Math

Reading

  1. Read the sixth chapter of What I Learned Over Summer Vacation, Precipitous. It starts on page 33.
  2. What word was taught in this chapter?
  3. What does it mean?
  4. How does the story show the word’s meaning?
  5. The main character says that running away with the circus is cliche and contrasted it with being full of surprises. Cliche refers to something that has been overused. “Run away with the circus” is the obvious, usually done way.
  6. The final writing traits are sentence fluency and proper use of grammar and punctuation. If you read the stories out loud, do they flow smoothly? Does it sound nice or does it stumble and fall flat?

Writing

  1. Here is your writing assignment (Writing Assignment Balderdash).
  2. Today, look up the words. You can copy and paste the list into a word processing document. Then you can search “define ____” and choose a definition to copy and paste into your document.
  3. Choose which word(s) you will use for you chapter title.
  4. Be thinking about what your story could be.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 137

Math

Writing

  1. Take a look at your assignment (Writing Assignment Balderdash).
  2. Make a list of plot events. What’s the character going to do first? Then what’s going to happen. What will the character decide to do next? There should be at least three major plot events. Don’t forget that it should start off in reality but at least one event should be balderdash.
  3. Today think about your plot. What are somethings that the character could learn or say “I learned that from…” List a few ideas.
  4. Play this idioms game. Write down any ones that you like that maybe you could use in your story.
  5. Here’s a list of idioms. Have a list of at least five that you like and want to try and use if you can.

Computer

  1. Under appearance click on Menus. Create a menu for your sidebar, options for people to choose from to help them get around your blog.
  2. Under appearance click on background. Change what you like.
  3. Explore any other options on the left hand menu of the dashboard.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2   Year 3      Year 4

Day 138

Math

Writing

  1. Take a look at your assignment (Writing Assignment Balderdash). Why? You always need to keep your goal in mind. Otherwise, it would be easy to get off track and forget where you were headed.
  2. Start writing. Write a whole page if you can. Remember it should sound like the main character is excited and full of energy. I never used dialog in these stories. “I” is just telling the stories.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 139

Math

Writing

  1. Take a look at your assignment (Writing Assignment Balderdash). Why? You always need to keep your goal in mind. Otherwise, it would be easy to get off track and forget where you were headed.
  2. Start writing. Write a whole page if you can.

Thinking

  1. Choose a thinking game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 140

Math

Writing

  1. Today finish writing.  (If you just can’t stop writing because it’s so exciting, then you will just have to keep working on it when you have free time until you are done.)
  2. Read your story out loud to someone. Mark the spots that don’t come out right.
  3. Fix anything you found when reading it out loud.
  4. Print it out.
  5. If you really like your story, send it to me at my gmail address allinonehomeschool. Maybe we can start a collection.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 141

Math

Reading

  1. You are going to read one more book this year, just for fun. It’s called Pollyanna.
  2. Read this summary and review .
  3. Here is another summary. (Scroll down just a bit.)
  4. Remember the parts of a book? List for this book the characters and setting.
  5. Now for the plot. I know you haven’t read it yet, but the summaries will help us.
  6. There is always an incident toward the very beginning of a book that sets off the plot. What is the incident in this book that incites the plot? (gets it going) (Answers)
  7. There is always a problem, a question to be resolved. What do you think the question is in this book?  (Answers)
  8. Then there is always some turning point, a climax. The question is about to be answered, but not quite yet. What big incident happens toward the end of the book?  (Answers)
  9. The plot ends with the resolution to the problem, the question has been answered. (And then you can make everyone fell good with a happy ending where everything is in its place.) What’s the resolution in this book?  (Answers)

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 142

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 1.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. You are going to be writing a book. Yes, you! Writing a book can be fun! I’ve done it!
  2. Today you are going to learn about genres. (I’m going to be using bits of lessons from the Little Blue School blog.)
  3. Dessert comes in genres — ice cream, candy, cake, pie. Within these genres are individual examples, but there are certain characteristics of candy bars as opposed to pie that make each one recognizable. Pie is not frozen, cake is not mushy, ice cream doesn’t come in a wrapper, etc.
  4. Books come in genres. They are similar to movie genres. Maybe you’ve seen a sports movie or a comedy movie or an action movie or a sad movie or a spy movie or a space movie…
  5. You could write a mystery story or a fantasy story in a made-up world…There are many choices. Here are some to think about.
    • Fable

      Narration demonstrating a useful truth, especially in which animals speak as humans; legendary, supernatural tale.

      Fairy Tale

      Story about fairies or other magical creatures, usually for children.

      Fantasy

      Fiction with strange or other worldly settings or characters; fiction which invites suspension of reality.

      Fiction

      Narrative literary works whose content is produced by the imagination and is not necessarily based on fact.

      Historical Fiction

      Story with fictional characters and events in a historical setting.

      Humor

      Fiction full of fun, fancy, and excitement, meant to entertain; but can be contained in all genres

      Legend

      Story, sometimes of a national or folk hero, which has a basis in fact but also includes imaginative material.

      Mystery

      Fiction dealing with the solution of a crime or the unraveling of secrets.

      Realistic Fiction

      Story that can actually happen and is true to life.

      Science Fiction

      Story based on impact of actual, imagined, or potential science, usually set in the future or on other planets.

      Tall Tale

      Humorous story with blatant exaggerations, swaggering heroes who do the impossible with nonchalance.
  6. Your turn. Open a brand new word processing document. You can save it as “My Book” until you have a title. Write at the top of the page your genre.
  7. Start thinking about your book, but we’re not ready to start writing yet.

Computer

  1. Write a post on your blog.
  2. Make sure you save it as a draft. Don’t publish it.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 143*

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 2.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.  (How old is Miss Jennie’s daughter? 11)

Writing*

  1. Read the first page of this lesson on specific nouns (specific nouns lesson).
  2. *Follow the directions on this worksheet (Specific Nouns).
  3. Make a list of six specific nouns that you might use in your book. Be specific. Don’t write snake; write python (for example). Type these in your book document where you wrote your genre.
  4. This list is for when you don’t know what to write next. You can look at this list and find an idea for what to write next. I did this before I wrote my book and I put every one of them into my book.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 144

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 3.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Every story has a protagonist, the hero of the story. This will be your main character. (Listen to how protagonist is pronounced.)
  2. Fill out this worksheet about your main character (Protagonist).
  3. Open your book document and write a description of your main character. Be as specific as possible. Does he have lots of friends? Do people think he’s handsome? Is she loving towards her little sisters? Who is this person? The better you know your character the better your story will be. You’ll know just what he or she would do in a situation. Make sure your main character is not perfect. He or she needs at least one major flaw. She can’t sing but she thinks she can. He can’t whistle (and he’ll need to in the story). She’s painfully shy. He can’t eat spaghetti. Whatever it is, it has to be part of the story.

Thinking

  1. Choose a thinking game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 145

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 4.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. What adjectives would you use to describe your protagonist?
  2. Adjectives help your readers picture just what you are picturing. If I wrote: I saw a dog. Each one of you would picture something different! If I wrote: I saw dog hairy enough that his eyes were concealed and large enough that he could lick my knee caps; I know because that’s just what he was doing. Do you think we’re picturing something more similar now? You need to describe what you are talking about. Specific nouns will help, so will adjectives.
  3. Work at a computer with a printer (or you can just do this on paper). You are going to write one adjective for every letter of the alphabet. If you do it online, choose option 1.
  4. Do all that you can. At the end, when you can’t think of any more and your brain is getting sore, then you can look here for ideas.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 146

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 5 .  audio version
  2. What is the game?  (This is really important to the book.)

Writing

  1. Now your hero, your protagonist, needs a sidekick. Who is the best friend? (It could be an animal.) Pollyanna’s is her game! She keeps it with her at all times. Who is always there for the hero?
  2. Describe this character just like you did your hero. Know everything about this character. Draw a picture.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2    Year 3     Year 4

Day 147

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 6 .  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Now your story needs a villian, the antagonist, the bad guy. Your main character is out to do something and your antagonist is trying to stop him. He always gets in the way. (This doesn’t have to be a person. In some books/movies it’s the weather, for instance. The weather, technical difficulties, or “bad luck” keeps getting in the way of the main character accomplishing their goal.)
  2. Describe your villian. Know everything about your antagonist. Don’t leave anything out. What are the strengths and weaknesses of your antagonist? Any quirks, habits? Draw a picture.
  3. Listen to how antagonist is pronounced.

Computer

  1.  Edit your post. Make sure you include a picture.
  2. Publish your post.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3   Year 4

Day 148

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 7 .  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Now your antagonist needs a sidekick. Who is there to carry out the tricky schemes?
  2. Describe the character. Name, address, phone number…just kidding, unless you really want to, that’s great! Know everything about this character. Draw a picture.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 149

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 8.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Every story needs a conflict. Otherwise it will sound like this. He woke up. He went outside to play. He ate dinner. He went to bed. No excitement! Something needs to happen!
  2. Earlier in the year you studied the parts of the Cinderella story. The background, setting, is her losing her father. The incident that sets off the conflict is the announcement of the ball. Cinderella (protagonist) wants to go. The evil step mother (antagonist) doesn’t want her to. The conflict is set. The question is raised, “Will Cinderella go to the ball and marry the prince?”
  3. What is your conflict? What does the hero try to do and the villian try to stop?
  4. What incident will happen in the beginning of the book to set up the conflict and raise the question that will be answered at the end of the book?
  5. Ideas? Something is lost and needs to be found. Someone starts a journey. Something needs to happen to set the course for the whole rest of the book.
  6. Write it all down in your document.

Thinking

  1. Choose a thinking game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 150

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 9.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. You’ve practiced choosing specific nouns. How about verbs?
  2. Write a specific verb for each of these verbs and adverbs. Choosing more exciting words will make your book more exciting.
    • Walked quickly
    • Laughed crazily
    • Talked slowly
    • Walked proudly
    • Laughed quietly
    • Talked quickly
    • Walked unevenly
    • Laughed squeakily
    • Talked loudly

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 151

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 10.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Today you are going to describe the setting of your book. There will actually be many settings (specific rooms, places the character goes, etc.).
  2. Here are some things to think about with setting:
    • Place (the castle, Chicago, the woods)
    • Location (the dining room, the top of the Sears tower, beside the old oak tree)
    • Objects (a vase of tulips, a pair of binoculars, a ring of mushrooms)
    • Time (morning, midnight, dusk)
    • Weather (stormy, clear sky, hot)
  3. The time, weather and maybe location will change throughout your novel. You need to make sure you let the reading know the setting of the chapter you are writing. If your novel takes place over a long time, the weather will need to change!
  4. Today write a description of the overall setting of your book. Include
    • Time (today, 500 years ago, 500 years in the future)
    • Location (in South Philadelphia, the Great Wall of China, in the Pacific Ocean, in space)
    • Location part 2 (playground, store, apartment, castle, house, village, school, space station, planet–more specific this time)
    • Weather (what time of year is it, what is the weather generally)
    • Description of your location part 2: Draw a picture and write a description, add as many details as possible. Does it have an apple tree? A good climbing tree? A place to hide? A fence? A secret tunnel? How will this setting help or hinder the good guy? the bad guy?

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 152

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 11.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Today describe 4 different smaller settings in your book. They could be different places, different rooms, different buildings. Include as many details as possible. What objects are there? How could those objects help or hinder your characters? Think of how you could use them in your book.

Computer

  1. Make sure your blog reflects you and what you want to share. Now is the time to change it if it doesn’t.
  2. Write a draft of a blog post.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 153

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 12.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Do you know your basic story?
    • It’s going to start with the background, setting the scene.
    • Then there’s going to be an incident that sets off the conflict and asks the big question.
    • Then there is going to be conflict, complications, ups and downs.
    • Then there is the climax. This is the last big scene where we will find out the answer to the question. It’s tense. We are in suspense.
    • Then is the final scene where we find out what happens to everyone and everything is tied up neatly with a bow and we are satisfied and happy.
  2. Write out each of those steps for you book. Add a few complications, conflict points, where your character seems to get ahead and then is knocked back down. In the beginning we think, “Of course, he’s going to get there. Of course he’s going to win.” and etc. At some point we need to question, “Maybe he’s not going to…” It needs to look bad for our main character.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 154

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 13.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Let’s think a little more about your story. There can be smaller stories within your story. Maybe he wins the big game but by the end winning isn’t as important anymore because he’s made friends. Or maybe he’s always fighting with his brothers but in the story they need to work together and they become friends. Maybe he’s failing at school but he discovers the secret formula and can save the planet and gets an A+ in science.
  2. Think about it. What would be the beginning, middle and end for this smaller story?

Thinking

  1. Choose a thinking game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2   Year 3      Year 4

Day 155*

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 14.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing*

  1. *Print out two copies of page 24 (while you are there, you can print out page 26 as well.)  Fill out the plot points for a book or movie that you know really well. Fill the second one out for your novel that you are going to write.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 156

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 15.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Fill out the chapter list (page 26 of the pdf).
  2. Each chapter is its own little story. This the chapter where he finds the …..  This is the chapter where he gets lost… This is the chapter where he meets…
  3. Your first chapter is your introduction, setting the background to the story.
  4. By the end of that chapter or in the next chapter you should have your incident that will set off your question, set your story in motion.
  5. Your last chapter is your resolution, what happens to everyone in the end.
  6. The last few chapters before that is your climax, the exciting last event.
  7. In between your protagonist and antagonist each need to have times when they are ahead and when they are behind.
  8. You may not be able to fill in all the chapter spots on the worksheet. That’s okay. Do your best. Aim for ten.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 157

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 16.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Today is the big day. You are going to start writing your novel. Aim at working on it for 30 minutes each day.
  2. The most important thing is to write. Just write something. Momentum is very important to authors. Get on a roll. It’s hardest to get the ball rolling. It’s easier to keep it rolling. So just start writing. Write something.

Computer

  1. Edit your post, finalize it and publish it.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 158

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 17.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Write! Write! Write! Aim at working on it for 30 minutes each day.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 159

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 18.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Write your book! Yeah!
  2. Use all of the things we worked on together. Use all of your descriptions. Make sure to use your characters strengths and weaknesses.

Thinking

  1. Choose a thinking game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 160

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 19.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Write! Make sure to describe your settings so that your audience is picturing what you are picturing.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 161

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 20.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Write! Keep going! Don’t stop!
  2. When you write a dialog, “hear” the people talking in your head. What do they sound like? How do they talk?

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 162

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 21.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Write! What object can you put in your story that will help out your character?

Computer

  1. Write a draft of a post. Include a picture!

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 163

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 22.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Write! What’s going to happen today?

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 164

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 23.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Write!

Thinking

  1. Choose a thinking game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 165 

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 24.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. DON’T Write!
  2. Today, go back. Read your whole story from the beginning. It’s best to read it out loud.
  3. Is there anything you’d like to change?
  4. Can you add more detail to your description of your characters or settings so that your audience pictures what you picture?
  5. Can you picture your story as a movie in your mind?
  6. Picture it as you read. Are there any gaps that you need to fill in?
  7. Now, go back and read all of your answers from the days you described your characters and settings. Look at your answers when you wrote nouns and verbs.
  8. Look at your chapter list and plot summary pages.
  9. Are you happy with where you are? Fix what want.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 166

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 25.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Time to write again. Get going!

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 167

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 26.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Write! What problem is going to hinder your protagonist?

Computer

  1. Read your draft. Edit it. Publish it.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 168

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 27.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Write!

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 169

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 28.  audio version
  2. What does Pollyanna realize she can be happy about?  (hint: end of the chapter)

Writing

  1. Write!

Thinking

  1. Choose a thinking game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 170

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 29.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Write!

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 171

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 30.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Write!

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 172

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 31.  audio version
  2. Tell someone about the chapter.

Writing

  1. Write!

Computer

  1. Write a draft of a post.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2    Year 3    Year 4

Day 173

Math

Reading

  1. Read chapter 32.  audio version
  2. The last chapter is a letter. Who is writing to whom?
  3. How does the book end?

Writing

  1. Write!

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 174

Math

Writing

  1. STOP!
  2. Time to go back and read again.
  3. Picture the movie of your story in your mind. Does it make sense? Fix anything that doesn’t work right.
  4. Think about your characters, settings, chapters, etc.
  5. What haven’t you added yet?
  6. What needs to happen in your story?
  7. Have you made conflict and complications for your protagonist?
  8. What is going to happen next?
  9. How are you going to get to your exciting climax?

Thinking

  1. Choose a thinking game from levels 4-6.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 175

Math

Writing

  1. Write. Write lots and lots.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2   Year 3     Year 4

Day 176

Math

Writing

  1. Write. Write lots and lots.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2   Year 3     Year 4

Day 177

Math

Writing

  1. Write. Write lots and lots.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 178

Math

Writing

  1. Write. Write lots and lots.

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 179

Math

Writing

  1. Write. Can you get to the end?

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

Day 180

Math

Writing

    1. You made it to the last day of school. I don’t know where you are in your novel.
    2. Keep writing if you have more to go.
    3. If you got to the end, spend lots of time reading your novel and making it better.
    4. Choose better words, change the lengths of your sentences. Add to your descriptions.
    5. When you are all done, you could send me your book and I could post it in the Hall of Fame if you would like others to read it.
    6. If you want to turn it into a real book, you can use a free service called CreateSpace through Amazon.com. Follow their directions and you can publish your book for free. It will help you make a cover and everything. Then your friends and family can buy your book!

Click on what program year you are studying:  Year 1     Year 2     Year 3    Year 4

You Did It, Congratulations!

Summer School

  1. If needed, daily copywork for handwriting.
  2. If needed/desired, continue work on math. Make sure you know your facts. If it’s still a struggle, use xtramath.org and the math facts practice page.
  3. Read any or all of the Alger books listed under level 5.

Written by Easy Peasy All-in-One Homeschool

March 30, 2012 at 4:27 am

6 Responses

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. How do I see the answers? It says it is password protected> Thanks

    cheryl

    August 18, 2012 at 5:08 am

  2. Is the Easy Peasy program meet state standards?

    Veronica Krause

    January 22, 2013 at 7:41 am

    • Every state has their own standards.

      The King Will Make a Way

      February 6, 2013 at 7:23 pm

      • That does not answer my question. Does this program meet CA state standards?

        Veronica Krause

        February 6, 2013 at 7:33 pm

      • I don’t know what CA standards are. You can read what’s covered in the course descriptions on each individual course page.

        The King Will Make a Way

        February 6, 2013 at 8:16 pm


Comments are closed.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,218 other followers

%d bloggers like this: